× Didrangea (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ11790

ytiensis

Originally thought to be a Hydrangea species as described in the Flora of China, but after further investigation it has been recognised as a natural bi-generic hybrid. Forming a shrubs to only 1.5m tall where I found this unusual species in the wild in cleared forest where animals grazed, close to the border with China in northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2006. Immediately recognisable as different on account of the glossy elliptic leaves that were purple on both sides in the sun, a trait it has yet to perform in our garden, probably due to the lack of sun. In our garden the broad terminal cymes of all fertile blue to purple flowers are born all summer into autumn. Best grown in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention in sun or light shade out of freezing winds. Syn. H. lingii.

A GIFT (Annonaceae)

VOUCHER

IGNORE THE CARRIAGE CHARGE AT CHECKOUT ( more information below ) Crûg Farm Plants Gift Vouchers may be purchased online in multiples of £5.00. Simply add the voucher to your wheelbarrow and fill in the multiples in the quantity required when in your wheel barrow, in the same way that you would do with multiple purchase of plants. We will then fill in the voucher and post it to the address on your check out. Simply ignore the carriage cost at the checkout (there is no additional charge for vouchers), we can adjust this manually. If you require more than one Gift Voucher, please fill in for the total value and state your requirements in a covering email, mailorder@crug-farm.co.uk including the recipients addresses if appropriate.

Acanthopanax (Araliaceae)

see Eleutherococcus

Useful and ornamental hardy woody spiny plants varying from small to large shrubs or small trees and climbers. Useful to gardeners as they are able to grow is such difficult dark shady and even dry places, while being highly valued for their medicinal uses particularly in Asia. While also being ornamental in a relatively subdued fashion, being ivy relatives the flowers are similarly muted, but succeeded by more ornamental fruit, while the foliage can be compound like its other relative of Schefflera.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12729

aff. caudatum ssp. ukurunduense

An extremely tough and adaptable species we collected the small seed of from the T'aebaeksan area of the cold mountainous interior in the north of South Korea in 2010. More tree-like than the species for us in open conditions without shelter, where the new growth is a conspicuous orange in colour as one would expect in some dogwoods. This colouration being a strong feature both in the leaf-less winter months as well as the growing season. Bearing relatively large 5-7 lobed and coarsely serrated palmate leaves on red petioles. Easily grown in most types of fertile soils that retain some moisture while being drained, either in full sun (require more moisture) or in part to light shade.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11698

aff. reticulatum

An uncommon species rarely encountered in cultivation that we gathered the seed of in the extreme north of Vietnam, close to the Chinese border in 2006. Where it had formed into a small-medium sized well branched evergreen tree 6-7m tall, draped in dark green narrowly elliptical elongated leaves 10-12 × 2cm. Bearing distinctly large reddened winged seed in short pendant spikes. Best grown in shelter from cold drying winds and hard frosts.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8421

aff. rufinerve

A species we collected seed of from Ch'õllip'o Arboretum in South Korea. Where it formed a small tree to 7m tall, with a wonderful green and white stripped 'snake-bark' trunk. Also grown for its colourful shallowly tri-lobed broad leaves which turn a butter-yellow in the Autumn. Any good moisture retentive soil in part shade to full sun and shelter from drying winds. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11073

aff. shirasawanum v. tenuifolium

Forming a small bushy tree with asymmetrical sharply 9-11 lobed small leaves. An outstanding maple for its wonderful autumn colour of yellows through oranges to reds. From one of our collections gathered on the mountains of the Tottori area of Japan in the autumn of 2005. Easily grown in any type of moisture retentive fertile soil with good drainage, in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11096

aff. shirasawanum v. tenuifolium

An outstanding maple for its wonderful autumn colour of yellows through oranges to reds. Forming a small bushy tree with asymmetrical sharply 11-lobed small leaves. Just imagine our frustration of being in the middle of a large colony without finding seed, but eventually we did. On the mountains of the Hiroshima area of Japan in the autumn of 2005. Easily grown in any type of moisture retentive fertile soil with good drainage, in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12361

albopurpurascens

A small evergreen species originating from Taiwan, which is where we collected this seed. From Dasyueshan in the winter of 2007, from a tree 10m tall, with small simple lanceolate-acuminate (long narrow to a tail-like tip) dark green chartaceus leaves 10 × 2cm bearing small green winged seed in pairs, at 1850m. Only forming a small tree in gardens, best grown in a sheltered position in a sunny spot out of freezing winds in a relatively well drained soil that does not dry out when establishing.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10916

amoenum

A classic looking species where we found this small well branched elegant tree to only 4m tall, growing on the western side of Honshu the main island of the Japanese archipelago, in the autumn of 2005. Bearing deeply slenderly lobed palmate leaves which were turning scarlet-purple, with congested pendulous spikes of paired winged seed held at right angles. An easily grown small tree, but best sheltered from drying winds in a moisture retentive drained soil.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10977

amoenum

One of our seed collections gathered from Mt. Matsuoyama western Honshu Japan, in the autumn of 2005. Where this classic looking species formed a small well branched elegant tree to only 4m high. Bearing deeply and finely lobed palmate serrated leaves to 7.5cm long, which were turning scarlet, with congested pendulous spikes of paired winged seed held at right angles. An easily grown small tree, but best sheltered from drying winds in a moisture retentive drained soil. **** **** **** **** **** **** *** *** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants when dormant during the winter months. The pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12676

buergerianum

Memorable for being one of the brightest autumnal displays we encountered on our 2010 expeditions. Collected from small trees of less than 10m tall, with distinctly upright habits reminiscent of poplars, clothed in small tri-lobed leaves in various shades of reds from the bright reds through oranges and yellows. Luckily with ample u shaped small pairs of winged seed, on this hardy species growing in the cold interior of southern South Korea. A tough and easily grown species in almost any type of fertile soil, best grown in good light to form a densely branched small tree or large shrub.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12477

buergerianum v. formosanum

Only forming an evergreen small shrubby-tree in gardens, with sturdy branches, bearing small shallowly tri-lobed forwardly inclined, leathery leaves. With pendant racemes of winged seed, held in the axils in 'U' shaped pairs. This variety is endemic to the cooler north of Taiwan, where it has become almost extinct due to the pressure of urbanisation. Plants have survived well for us in an open field without protection. Best grown in a moisture retentive but well draining soil in sun to part shade, protected from freezing winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) GWJ9360

campbellii v. campbellii

Maturing to one of the most stunning hardy specimens that we grow, with conspicuous snake-bark branches, purple-red and bloomy when young. With handsome seven-five sharply palmately lobed glossy leaves emerging in deep coppery tones, held on bright red petioles. The small flowers are held in upright panicles, followed by red winged seed. Collected in 2002 from a 10m tall tree growing in a remote corner of Sikkim in the Lachung Valley, a deep furrow across the Himalayas in the direction of the Chinese border. Easily grown in a fertile moisture retentive humusy soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from cold drying winds. Was listed as A. campbellii v. serratifolium. *** *** **** ***** ***** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpo

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8270

campbellii v. fansipanense see pectinatum ssp. pec

A striking species, to 10m tall, that we collected seed of on the highest mountain in Vietnam. Bearing handsome star-shaped leaves, which were in their brilliant red and orange autumnal hues when we collected them. Any moist soil in part shade to sun and shelter from drying winds. Our collection from Fansipan, North Vietnam. ******************************As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only. Aprox 30 - 40 ltr

Acer (Aceraceae) GWJ9360

campbellii v. serratifolium see campbellii v. camp

Maturing to one of the most stunning hardy specimens that we grow, with conspicuous snake-bark branches, purple-red and bloomy when young. With handsome seven-five sharply palmately lobed glossy leaves emerging in deep coppery tones, held on bright red petioles. The small flowers are held in upright panicles, followed by red winged seed. Collected in 2002 from a 10m tall tree growing in a remote corner of Sikkim in the Lachung Valley, a deep furrow across the Himalayas in the direction of the Chinese border. Easily grown in a fertile moisture retentive humusy soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from cold drying winds.******************************These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10955

carpinifolium

An invaluable and yet unusual maple, as it looks more similar to a hornbeam, but with opposite leaves. Mimicking Carpinus japonica with simple oblong pleated leaves which turn a rich yellow in autumn, with long pendant spikes of winged seed on the small tree we found in the mountainous area of Nagano western Japan. A tough and easily grown species in almost any type of fertile soil, best grown in good light to form a densely branched small tree or large shrub. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11034

carpinifolium

A small tree we found in the mountainous area of Fukui of western Japan, of an invaluable and yet unusual maple, as it looks more similar to a hornbeam, but with opposite leaves. Mimicking Carpinus japonica with simple oblong pleated leaves which turn a rich yellow in autumn, with small clusters of winged seed almost hidden by the larger leaves. Easily grown in almost any type of fertile soil, best grown in good light to form a densely branched small tree or large shrub.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11124

carpinifolium

An invaluable and yet unusual maple, as it looks more similar to a hornbeam, but with opposite leaves. Mimicking Carpinus japonica with simple oblong pleated leaves which turn a rich yellow in autumn, with small clusters of winged seed almost hidden by the larger leaves on the small tree we found in the mountainous area of Fukuoka of southern Japan. Easily grown in almost any type of fertile soil, best grown in good light to form a densely branched small tree or large shrub. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12403

caudatifolium

From one of my collections gathered from the forest bordering the South Cross Highway in the high mountains of central Taiwan with Finlay and Dan in the autumn of 2007. A distinct and easily recognised snake-barked maple, eventually of medium proportions in the wild, but normally only forming a small tree in gardens to 7m. Also valued for its colourful shallowly trilobed elongated leaves turning crimson to rust in the autumn, contrasting with the long pendant strings of winged seed. Easily grown in any type of moisture retaining soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from drying winds. Syn. A. kawakamii. ***** **** **** **** **** **** **** These plants are supplied as open ground/bare rooted trees for containerised plants see A. kawakamii.

Acer (Aceraceae) GWJ9279

caudatum

A highly desirable species we collected seed of at a heady 3700m in Northern Sikkim in 2002. Where it had formed a small multi-stemmed tree to only 5m tall with a wonderful pinkish-grey peeling bark. Bearing handsome deeply five-lobed irregularly toothed leaves in a rich green, contrasting with the bright red petioles. The small flowers are held in upright panicles, followed by red winged seed, best grown in a chalk free soil. ****************************** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) GWJ9317

caudatum

From seed we collected in the upper Lachung Valley in eastern Sikkim in 2002 at 3400m with our friend Sally Goddard. Gathered from a small wizened multi-stemmed tree bare of any foliage, but still retaining the large winged seed in short spikes. Easily grown in a chalk free fertile moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from cold drying winds. ****************************** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, as they do not containerize. The pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) HWJK2338

caudatum

Forming a multi-stemmed small tree to 7m tall with wonderful pinkish-grey peeling bark. Where we collected the seed, close to the Tibetan border with Eastern Nepal at Topke Gola at over 3800m. With handsome deeply five-lobed irregularly toothed leaves in a rich green, contrasting with the bright red petioles. The small flowers are held in upright panicles, followed by red winged seed. Easily grown in a chalk free fertile moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from cold drying winds. ****************************** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) HWJK2240

caudatum

A seed collection we made along with Dan Hinkley close to the Tibetan border with Eastern Nepal at Thudam at 3240m in 2002. Where this multi-stemmed small tree to 8m tall bore handsome five-lobed leaves in full autumnal colour of intense shades of red and orange. Easily grown in a chalk free fertile moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from cold drying winds. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSW12583a

caudatum ssp. ukurunduense

Forming a shrubby tree (multi-stemmed) for us in open conditions without shelter. Where the new growth is a conspicuous deep red in colour as one would expect in some dogwoods. This colouration being a strong feature both in the leaf-less winter months as well as the growing season. Bearing relatively large 5-7 lobed and coarsely serrated palmate leaves on red petioles. An extremely tough and adaptable species we collected seed of from the T'aebaeksan area of the mountainous interior in the north of South Korea in 2010.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12602

caudatum ssp. ukurunduense

An extremely tough and adaptable species we collected the small seed of from the T'aebaeksan area of the cold mountainous interior in the north of South Korea in 2010. More tree-like than the species for us in open conditions without shelter, where the new growth is a conspicuous orange in colour as one would expect in some dogwoods. This colouration being a strong feature both in the leaf-less winter months as well as the growing season. Bearing relatively large 5-7 lobed and coarsely serrated palmate leaves on red petioles. Easily grown in most types of fertile soils that retain some moisture while being drained, either in full sun (require more moisture) or in part to light shade.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ9565

circinatum

Reputably a maple famous for its spectacular autumnal coloration, which in time forms a dense shrub to 5m tall. With purplish young stems, bearing rounded leaves to 15cm across, seven-nine lobed. This collection represents our gathering from the Olympic Mountains in the North West of Washington State USA. Easily grown in any kind of fertile moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from cold drying winds. *** **** ***** **** ***** ***** **** This plant can only be supplied as open ground/bare-rooted, for collection only as it is too tall for our carriers to handle.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10801

cissifolium

An elegant small tree or even a large shrub, with Cissus-like foliage, which differs from most maples in being trifoliate with the leaflets deeply serrated, giving an airy appearance. Dressed in its autumnal oranges and yellow when we collected the seed in 2005 from Mt. Kannariyama in northern Honshu Japan. Easily grown if sheltered from strong winds in a moisture retentive soil.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11036

crataegifolium

Only forming a large shrub where we found this seed in western Japan in 2005. With conspicuously striated bark and colourful ovate-elongated shallowly trilobed leaves, 6cm long, turning crimson in the autumn. Bearing pendant clusters of reddish winged seed. Easily grown in any moist fertile soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the .

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11036

crataegifolium

Only forming a large shrub where we found this seed in western Japan in 2005. With conspicuously striated bark and colourful ovate-elongated shallowly trilobed leaves, 6cm long, turning crimson in the autumn. Bearing pendant clusters of reddish winged seed. Easily grown in any moist fertile soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ6886

duplicatoserratum

For various reasons this most ornamental (newly recognised) species from the Palmata section, is inexplicably rare in cultivation. Originating from the Central Mountain Range of Taiwan where we have only encountered fabulous huge ancient trees growing in high elevation moist forests. Which may be one explanation why seed is difficult to obtain. Like many members of this section, they are slow growing, but with an upright habit of short slender villose reddened young branches bearing deeply 5-7 lobed pubescent serrated leaves. Easily grown in most fertile moisture retentive drained soils in part shade to sun and shelter from drying winds. Syn. A. palmatum v. pubescens.

Acer (Aceraceae) FMWJ13157

erythranthum

A hitherto new species to cultivation closely resembling A. laevigatum. Gathered in the north of Vietnam in 2011, from a deep valley close to Fansipan the highest mountain there. Where it had only formed a small well branched evergreen tree, clothed in dark green broadly lanceolate leaves, apart from the conspicuously pink tinted juvenile growth which was serrated and acuminate tipped. Best grown in a fertile soil that is drained, but with some moisture retention, in sun or part shade, protect from freezing winds and severe frost when young.

Acer (Aceraceae) WWJ11614

fabri

A small well branched evergreen slender tree, clothed in glossy dark green lanceolate leaves with undulating margins, held on petioles 2-3 cm long. Contrasting from the juvenile growth which is conspicuously pink tinted and serrated with long acuminate tips. Bearing short pendant clusters of very ripe winged seed when we found it. From one of our collections gathered in the cool mountain Séo Mí Tý of northern Vietnam with Peter Wharton, in the autumn of 2006 at 1800m. Best grown in shelter from cold drying winds and hard frosts in a well drained soil with some moisture retention. Larger size also available.

Acer (Aceraceae) BWJ7515

forrestii

From one of my seed collections gathered from the mountain slopes surrounding Zhongdian, North Western Yunnan, China in 2000 with Dan Hinkley at 3550m. Where they formed conspicuous small trees with upright striated trunks bearing slender red arching branches of deeply trilobed acuminate leaves on bright red petioles, heavily laden with pink fruit. Easily grown in sun or part shade in an acid to neutral fertile soil. ******************************This plant can only be supplied as open ground/bare-rooted, for collection only as it is too tall for our carriers to handle.

Acer (Aceraceae) FMWJ13374

heptaphlebium

Forming a colourful small tree in British gardens where it has proved to be hardier than expected. Being a seed collection gathered from only 2000m in northern most Vietnam, close to the Chinese border in 2011. Collected from a relatively small tree to only10 m tall, where we found this rarity, in severely disturbed ancient forest. Bearing broad palmate deeply 5-7 long and pointedly lobed thick-textured glossy leaves 15 cm across. As well as pendant racemes of red winged pairs of seed held almost horizontally. Best grown in shelter from the coldest weather in a fertile retentive, but drained soil.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11713

heptaphlebium

From seed we collected from a relatively small tree to 10 m tall, where we collected the seed of this rarity, in severely disturbed ancient forest. Bearing broad palmate deeply 5-7 long and pointedly lobed thick-textured glossy leaves 15 cm across. As well as pendant racemes of red winged pairs of seed held almost horizontally. Gathered in the extreme north of Vietnam, close to the Chinese border in 2006.

Acer (Aceraceae) DJHV06063

heptaphlebium

From seed given to us and collected by Dan Hinkley in the autumn of 2006. From a tree to 16m tall bearing broad palmate 7-10 long and pointedly lobed thick-textured glossy leaves 20 cm across. As well as pendant racemes of red winged pairs of seed held almost horizontally. Gathered from the north eastern side of Fansipan, the highest mountain in Vietnam in the extreme north.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11695

heptaphlebium

Only forming a small tree where we collected the seed of this rarity, in an area which had been severely cut-over. Bearing broad palmate 7 long and pointedly lobed thick-textured glossy leaves 15 cm across. As well as pendant racemes of red winged pairs of seed held almost horizontally. Gathered in the extreme north of Vietnam, close to the Chinese border in 2006.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12840

japonicum

A beautiful small tree or large shrub, eventually of medium proportions in the wild, where we gathered the seed of this collection on the frozen high mountains of Shikoku (island) Japan at 1,000m in the autumn of 2010. Grown for its soft green 7-9 lobed leaves which turn to shades of crimson in the autumn. This collection were noticeably long haired below the foliage, while the bumper crop of very small seed were in V shaped pairs. Any type of moisture retentive fertile drained soil in part shade to sun, shelter from drying winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12847

japonicum

A selection of this beautiful small tree or large shrub, which is capable eventually of attaining medium proportions in the wild. Selected for its larger more lobed soft green 7-9 lobed leaves which turn to shades of crimson in the autumn. The bumper crop of very small seed were in V shaped pairs, gathered on the frozen high mountains of Shikoku (island) Japan at 1,370m in the autumn of 2010 with Finlay Colley. Any type of moisture retentive fertile drained soil in part shade to sun, shelter from drying winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12403

kawakamii

From one of my collections gathered from the forest bordering the South Cross Highway in the high mountains of central Taiwan with Finlay and Dan in the autumn of 2007. A distinct and easily recognised snake-barked maple, eventually of medium proportions in the wild, but normally only forming a small tree in gardens to 7m. Also valued for its colourful shallowly trilobed elongated leaves turning crimson to rust in the autumn, contrasting with the long pendant strings of winged seed. Easily grown in any type of moisture retaining soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from drying winds. Syn. A. caudatifolium.

Acer (Aceraceae) RWJ9843

kawakamii

A distinct and easily recognised snake-barked maple, eventually of medium proportions in the wild, but normally only forming a small tree in gardens to 7m. Also valued for its colourful shallowly trilobed elongated leaves turning crimson to rust in the autumn, contrasting with the long pendant strings of winged seed. Easily grown in any type of moisture retaining soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from drying winds. Our collection from Central Taiwan in 2003. Syn. A. caudatifolium.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11684

laevigatum

A species rarely encountered in cultivation that we gathered the seed of in the extreme north of Vietnam, close to the Chinese border in 2006. Where it had formed into a small-medium sized well branched evergreen tree 6-7m tall, draped in dark glossy green narrowly elliptical elongated leaves. Bearing short pendant clusters of very ripe (when we found them) winged seed. Best grown in shelter from cold drying winds and hard frosts in a drained fertile soil with a bit of moisture retention.

Acer (Aceraceae) FMWJ13439

laevigatum

A species rarely encountered in cultivation that we gathered the seed of in the north of Vietnam, from an area called Five Fingers, close to the hill town of Sapa. Where it had formed into a small-medium sized well branched evergreen tree 6-7m tall, draped in dark glossy green narrowly elliptical elongated leaves. Bearing short pendant clusters of very ripe (when we found them) winged seed. Best grown in shelter from cold drying winds and hard frosts in a drained fertile soil with a bit of moisture retention.

Acer (Aceraceae) KWJ12232

laurinum

After an exhaustive search in our happy hunting grounds in 2007, around Fansipan the highest mountain in the north of Vietnam. A new seed collection, from a small handsome evergreen tree with 17cm long oblong-shaped long-tipped leaves, which emerge a coppery red ageing a thick-textured glossy-green above while conspicuously silvery-white/glaucous below. Usually only forming a large shrub or small trees in British gardens with semi-persistent leaves in the colder gardens. Best grown sheltered from freezing winds, ideally with a bit of overhead cover in good light in a drained humusy soil without too much nutrients. Previously offered as A. oblongum.

Acer (Aceraceae) FMWJ13412

laurinum

A chance find in the depth of the forest close to where we had set up camp for the week, in the forest of Y Ty in the very north of Vietnam. A recently felled tree of medium size heavy in seed lay across our path. A handsome evergreen tree with 17cm long lance-shaped leaves, which emerge a coppery red ageing to thick-textured glossy-green above while conspicuously white/glaucous below. Usually only forming a large shrub or small trees in British gardens with semi-persistent leaves. Best grown sheltered from freezing winds, ideally with a bit of overhead cover in good light in a drained humusy soil without too much nutrients. Previously offered as A. oblongum.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12592

mandschuricum

From one of the coldest locations we have collected from at this elevation of 1280m, in the mountains of central South Korea on Taebaeksan. Where we found many of the medium-sized trees of this unusual tri-foliate species cloaked in their autumnal glow, but only one bearing seed. The small oblong-elliptic leaflets 4 x 1.5cm were a red rusty to red or yellow above while a contrasting glaucous white below, all held together on red petioles and petiolules (leaf stalks). While the dull brown seed were easily seen contrasting below the foliage. Easily grown in a fertile drained soil with a bit of moisture retention, best in sun to light shade for a good autumnal colour.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12843

micranthum

From seed I collected with Finlay Colley in the autumn of 2010, from a small densely branched tree only 2m tall with palmately 5-lobed leaves turning yellow in the mountain frosts of the high mountain in Ehime, northern Shikoku island Japan. A distinct small species on account of the central leaf lobe being larger combined with exceptionally small seed. Best grown in some shelter from strong winds in a drained soil with some moisture retention.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11473

morifolium

Virtually unknown species in cultivation, with conspicuously striated bark and large ovate-orbicular shallowly 5-lobed leaves to 20cm across. Bearing long pendant spikes of winged seed when we found this medium-sized tree growing at the edge of the forest on the island of Yakushima southern Japan in 2006. Easily grown in most fertile drained soils in full sun to part shade with shelter particularly from freezing winds. **** ****** ******** ****** ****** Also larger plants available as open ground/bare-rooted plants during the dormant period (winter). These would be for collection only.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12438

morrisonense

From one of my collections gathered close to Tayuling in the mountains of eastern Taiwan with Finlay and Dan in the autumn of 2007. Of this conspicuous snake-barked tree which draws comment year round, capable of forming sizeable trees in the wild, more restrained in gardens. Also grown for its colourful red stemmed shallowly 5-lobed leaves, which were almost orbicular in this collection, turning rusty orange in the Autumn. Easily grown in a moist soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds. Syn. A. rubescens. **************** Larger multi-stemmed size available during dormant period (winter) as open ground/bare-rooted plants.

Acer (Aceraceae) RWJ9840

morrisonense

A seed collection of this fabulous snake-barked tree, forming sizeable trees in the wild, which we gathered from Tayuling in the mountains of northern Taiwan in 2003. Also grown for its colourful red stemmed shallowly 5-lobed leaves, which were almost orbicular in this collection, turning crimson in the Autumn. Easily grown in a moist soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds. Syn. A. rubescens.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ14060

negundo ssp. californicum

A form of this very popular and rather unusual maple that has pinnately arranged relatively large leaflets at 4-8cm long. That are downy shallowly lobed comprising of 3-7 leaflets to a leaf, with soft pubescent emerging shoots and young leaves. The inflorescences of the male trees of this subspecies are reputedly pink and showy, while the females bear large winged seed. From one of our seed collections from The Russian River area, which is north of San Francisco in western California on our 2014 trip there. Growing at the edge of dense low woodland close to the river. Best grown in some shelter from cold winds in a drained soil with some moisture retention.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8542

okamotoanum

Syn. A. pictum ssp. okamotoanum. Our collection from the remote Korean island of Ullüngdõ where this species in endemic. We collected the seed from a small tree growing in a deep crater of the domineering extinct volcano. Forming a medium sized tree in time in the wild, with variable palmately sharply 5-7 lobed leaves which emerge (unscathed by cold) earlier than any other species we grow turning a bright yellow in autumn. Held on young branches and petioles which are reddish in colour. Easily grown in any moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds. ******************************This plant can only be supplied as open ground/bare-rooted, for collection only as it is too tall for our carriers to handle.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12437

oliverianum ssp. formosanum

From one of my seed collections gathered with Finlay Colley and Dan from a small multi-stemmed tree 4m tall near Tayuling in the high mountains of north-eastern Taiwan in the autumn of 2007. From an elevation of 2550m, higher than any previous collection that we have gathered of this distinctly dainty slow-growing tree. Bearing wonderfully colourful glossy deeply and narrowly five-lobed parchment-textured leaves, which emerge a bronzy colour in spring, only slowly transform to green while fresh foliage emerges to continue the colourful display. All these eventually turning crimson-bronze in the autumn, on dark slender stems. Best grown in a moist soil in part shade to full sun, sheltered from strong winds. Syn. A. serrulatum.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ6773

oliverianum ssp. formosanum

Please see Acer serrulatum CWJ12437 (the name used in the Flora of Taiwan for this species) An elegant slow-growing slender tree in our garden, eventually of large proportions in the wild, to even 20m, but closer to 5m in gardens. Bearing wonderfully colourful glossy long narrowly five-lobed leaves emerging bronze in the spring eventually turning crimson-bronze in the autumn. Best grown in a moist fertile soil in part shade to sun, sheltered from drying/freezing winds. One of our seed collections from the high mountains of Taiwan. Syn. A. serrulatum.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10916

palmatum v. amoenum See A. amoenum

A classic looking species where we found this small well branched elegant tree to only 4m tall, growing on the western side of Honshu the main island of the Japanese archipelago, in the autumn of 2005. Bearing deeply slenderly lobed palmate leaves which were turning scarlet-purple, with congested pendulous spikes of paired winged seed held at right angles. An easily grown small tree, but best sheltered from drying winds in a moisture retentive drained soil..

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8606

palmatum v. coreanum

A wonderful form of this well known tree that we collected seed of from the mountainous area of Sobaeksan, South Korea. Only forming a small tree in the wild, with slender deeply lobed palmate leaves, which were dark green turning crimson, at the time we were collecting the seed in the Autumn. Any humusy moist soil, in part shade to sun and shelter from cold or drying winds. **** **** **** ***** **** *** **** ** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants when dormant during the winter months. The pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11100

palmatum v. matsumurae

A decorative variety we collected seed of in the Hiroshima area of Japan. Where it was commonly encountered forming small shrubby multi-branched trees to 6m tall and wide. Clothed in deeply and narrowly lobed small palmate leaves, which were a glorious golden yellow and warm tints of orange when we encountered them in the autumn of 2005. Easily grown in any good fertile drained soil, best sheltered from strong cold winds. 2.5m tall plants ****************************** These plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11195

palmatum v. matsumurae

A decorative variety of this traditional species we collected seed of in the Fuji-San area of Japan. Where we encountered it forming a sizeable colony of small shrubby multi-branched trees to 6m tall and wide. Clothed in deeply and narrowly lobed small palmate leaves, which were a glorious bright yellow with warm tints of orange when we found them in the autumn of 2005. Easily grown in any good fertile drained soil, best sheltered from strong cold winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) GWJ9354

pectinatum

An exceptionally rare and highly ornamental shrubby tree, which has always been considered tender, until this collection proved to the contrary, flourishing in our exposed field from 2002 seedlings. Where they have formed conspicuously colourful multi stemmed shrubs with young wood emerging a bright red slowly ageing green with distinctive white striation (snakebark). The red emerging thick textured leaves are shallowly tri-lobed to inconspicuously 5-lobed, with the central lobe much longer, while the juvenile leaves have additional small basal lobes. From one of our seed collections from a remote corner of Sikkim at almost 3,000m, in the Lachung Valley. Easily grown in a fertile moisture retentive soil (usually chalk free) in part shade to sun, best sheltered from cold drying winds. ****

Acer (Aceraceae) HWJ944

pectinatum ssp. pectinatum

A striking species, to 10m tall, that we collected seed of on the highest mountain in Vietnam. Bearing handsome star-shaped leaves, which were in their brilliant red and orange autumnal hues when we collected them. Any moist soil in part shade to sun and shelter from drying winds. Our collection from Fansipan, North Vietnam. Previously offered as A. campbellii v. fansipanense. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) HWJ569

pectinatum ssp. pectinatum

A star player in our garden where this striking species, thrives in the shade of large sycamore. Originating from seed we collected on the highest mountain in Vietnam, on Fansipan way to the north. Bearing handsome one sided star-shaped leaves, which were in their brilliant red and orange autumnal hues when we collected them. Although recorded to 10m tall, we can only see a fraction of this size in cultivation. Easily grown in any type of moisture retentive drained soil in part shade to sun and shelter from strong drying winds. Previously offered as A. campbellii v. fansipanense.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12623

pictum ssp. okamotoanum

Syn. A. okamotoanum. Our latest collection of this species that is endemic to the remote South Korean island of Ullüngdõ, 80 km east of the mainland. A relatively fast growing very hardy tree, forming a medium sized wide tree in the wild, with variable palmately sharply 5-7 lobed leaves which emerge bright glossy green, (unscathed by cold) earlier than any other species we grow turning a bright yellow in autumn. Held on young branches and petioles which are reddish in colour. Easily grown in any moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8542

pictum ssp. okamotoanum

Our collection from the remote Korean island of Ullüngdõ where this species in endemic. We collected the seed from a small tree growing in a deep crater of the domineering extinct volcano. Forming a medium sized tree in time in the wild, with variable palmately sharply 5-7 lobed leaves which turn a bright yellow in autumn. Held on young branches and petioles which are reddish in colour. Easily grown in any moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds. SOLD OUT

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12737

pictum v. mayrii

From seed we collected in the autumn of 2010, from a colony of trees growing atop of steep cliffs on the south coast of Kõjedo one of the many islands off the south coast of mainland Korea. Here they formed gray trunked stocky trees to 10m tall clothed in broad glossy shallowly 5-lobed 15cm wide leaves, with flat green seed. Easily grown in fertile drained soil with some moisture retention sheltered from the strongest of winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8746

pseudosieboldianum

A highly desirable but rare small tree or shrub which is grown for its bloomy young shoots and colourful leaves, distinctly sharply 11 lobed. Turning a bright butter yellow in the Autumn. Easily grown in any moist soil in part shade to sun and shelter from drying winds. Hardy to -25C. Our wild collection from Kõjedõ South Korea. One of the very best for autumn colour. ****************************** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8769

pseudosieboldianum

Our wild collection from the island of Cheju South Korea, of this highly desirable but rare small tree or shrub. Which is grown for its bloomy young shoots and colourful leaves, distinctly sharply 11-lobed, turning a bright butter yellow in the Autumn. Easily grown in any moist soil in part shade to sun and shelter from drying winds. Hardy to -25C. One of the very best for autumn colour. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8468

pseudosieboldianum

From our own seed collection gathered with Andrea Jones (photographer) from the rugged mountainous Odaesan area of South Korea. We found growing in a shaded forest forming a small tree-large shrub to 7m tall with autumnally colourful distinctly sharply 11 lobed leaves which had turned a bright red to butter yellow. A highly desirable but rare species which is grown for its bloomy young shoots. Easily grown in any type of moist fertile soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds. Hardy to -25C. One of the very best for autumn colour ***** ***** ****** ****** ***** *** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8766

pseudosieboldianum v. microsieboldianum

An unusual form of this well known tree that we collected seed of from the island of Chejudõ, South Korea. Eventually of medium proportions in the wild, grown for its colourful deeply lobed leaves which remain quite small in this form, turning crimson in the Autumn. Any humusy moist soil in part shade to sun and shelter from cold or drying winds. ****************************** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12438

rubescens

From one of my collections gathered close to Tayuling in the mountains of eastern Taiwan with Finlay and Dan in the autumn of 2007. Of this conspicuous snake-barked tree which draws comment year round, capable of forming sizeable trees in the wild, more restrained in gardens. Also grown for its colourful red stemmed shallowly 5-lobed leaves, which were almost orbicular in this collection, turning rusty orange in the Autumn. Easily grown in a moist soil in part shade to sun with shelter from drying winds. Syn. A. morrisonense.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10924

rufinerve

From our seed collection from Yamagata north-western Japan. Where this species only formed a small tree, with ornamentally stripped snake-bark. With wonderfully coloured (red to orange) broad shallowly lobed leaves with long slender tips and long pendant spikes of winged seed. Easily grown in almost any type of fertile soil in part shade to full sun. Over 3m tall ****************************** This plant can only be supplied as open ground/bare-rooted, for collection only during the dormant winter months, as it is too tall for our carriers to handle.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10959

rufinerve

An easily grown though species that we gathered the seed of from the snow covered mountains of Nagano on the western side of Honshu Japan in the autumn of 2005. Where it had only formed a small tree 6m tall, with a conspicuous striated bark. With wonderfully coloured (red to orange) broad shallowly lobed leaves with long slender tips and long pendant spikes of winged seed. Easily grown in almost any type of fertile soil in part shade to full sun. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11571

rufinerve

From one of our 2006 collections gathered from the Kyôbashira Pass in the mountains of Shikoku Island Japan. An invaluable snake-bark maple, with green white striated branches bearing 3-5 shallowly lobed palmate leaves, which transform to wonderful autumnal hues. With pendant spikes of winged seed late summer-autumn, forming a medium sized tree, easily cultivated in most fertile soils, best in some shelter from strong winds. ****************************** Also larger plants available as open ground/bare-rooted plants during the dormant period (winter), the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10845

rufinerve

Forming only a small tree where we collected the seed of this species, with ornamental snake-bark. With wonderfully coloured (red to orange) broad shallowly lobed leaves and long pendant spikes of winged seed. Easily grown in almost any type of fertile soil in part shade to full sun. Our collection from Aomori northern Japan. ****************************** Also larger plants available as open ground/bare-rooted plants during the dormant period (winter).

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12437

serrulatum

From one of my seed collections gathered with Finlay Colley and Dan from a small multi-stemmed tree 4m tall near Tayuling in the high mountains of north-eastern Taiwan in the autumn of 2007. From an elevation of 2550m, higher than any previous collection that we have gathered of this distinctly dainty slow-growing tree. Bearing wonderfully colourful glossy deeply and narrowly five-lobed parchment-textured leaves, which emerge a bronzy colour in spring, only slowly transform to green while fresh foliage emerges to continue the colourful display. All these eventually turning crimson-bronze in the autumn, on dark slender stems. Best grown in a moist soil in part shade to full sun, sheltered from strong winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) CWJ12437

serrulatum

From one of my seed collections gathered with Finlay Colley and Dan from a small multi-stemmed tree 4m tall near Tayuling in the high mountains of north-eastern Taiwan in the autumn of 2007. From an elevation of 2550m, higher than any previous collection that we have gathered of this distinctly dainty slow-growing tree. Bearing wonderfully colourful glossy deeply and narrowly five-lobed parchment-textured leaves, which emerge a bronzy colour in spring, only slowly transform to green while fresh foliage emerges to continue the colourful display. All these eventually turning crimson-bronze in the autumn, on dark slender stems. Best grown in a moist soil in part shade to full sun, sheltered from strong winds. ******** Open ground plant supplied when dormant.

Acer (Aceraceae) RWJ9912

serrulatum

A distinctly dainty slow-growing tree usually to 5m tall in gardens, but of much larger proportions in the wild. Bearing wonderfully colourful glossy narrowly five-lobed leaves turning crimson-bronze in the autumn, on dark slender stems. Best grown in a moist soil in part shade to full sun, sheltered from strong winds. From one of our seed collection made in the mountains in northern Taiwan in 2003. ****************************** This plant can only be supplied as open ground/bare-rooted, for collection only as it is too tall for our carriers to handle.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10849

sieboldianum

Forming a classic shaped small Japanese maple in time, a small finely branched erect tree or large shrub. With small 7-9 lobed and serrated leaves, which colour up to a coppery red contrasting with the pendant spikes of paired winged seed held horizontally in autumn. A tough very hardy species, but best grown out of strong winds to protect the foliage. One of our seed collections we gathered in the Aomori district of northern Japan during out collecting trip in the autumn of 2005. Easily grown in most types of fertile drained soils. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11090

sieboldianum

Forming a classic shaped small Japanese maple in time, a small finely branched erect tree or large shrub. With small 7-9 lobed and serrated leaves, which were a coppery red contrasting with the pendant spikes of paired winged seed held horizontally. One of our seed collections we found growing on the mountains of Hiroshima, southern Honshu, Japan during out collecting trip in the autumn of 2005. A tough very hardy species, but best grown out of strong winds to protect the foliage, in most types of fertile drained soils. ****************************** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11049

sieboldianum

One of our seed collections we found growing on Mt. Daisen, south-western Honshu, Japan during out collecting trip in the autumn of 2005. Forming a classic shaped small Japanese maple in time, a small finely branched erect tree or large shrub. With small 7-9 lobed and serrated leaves, which were a coppery red contrasting with the pendant spikes of paired winged seed held horizontally. A tough very hardy species, but best grown out of strong winds to protect the foliage, in most types of fertile drained soils. ****************************** Also larger plants available as open ground/bare-rooted plants during the dormant period (winter), the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ10962

sieboldianum v. tsushimense

Forming a classic shaped small Japanese maple in time, a small finely branched erect tree or large shrub. With small deeply 7-lobed and serrated leaves to 5cm across, which were a bright red contrasting with the pendant spikes of paired winged seed held horizontally. When we found the tree growing in Togakushi, western Honshu, Japan during out collecting trip in the autumn of 2005. A tough very hardy species, but best grown out of strong winds to protect the foliage, in most types of fertile drained soils.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11703

sikkimense

A wonderfully handsome semi-evergreen species which has semi-persistent thick-textured foliage in British gardens, where it only forms a large shrub or small tree, with young shoots emerging a coppery red. From one of our seed collections gathered in the most northerly area of Vietnam, where it formed sizeable trees with 15cm long shallowly lobed elliptic leaves, dark glossy-green above turning crimson in winter. Graced by long dense pendant racemes of small winged seed when we found it. Best grown in a sheltered warm situation.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ11689

sikkimense

Still very scarce in cultivation a semi-evergreen colourful species which has semi-persistent thick-textured foliage in British gardens, where it only forms a large shrub or small tree, with young shoots and leaves emerging a brilliant red. Forming sizeable trees in the wild with 15cm long shallowly lobed elliptic leaves, which slowly transform to a dark glossy-green above again turning crimson in autumn. All this graced by long dense pendant racemes of small winged seed when we found it, in the most northerly area of Vietnam close to the Chinese border. Best grown in a situation sheltered from freezing winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) FMWJ13166

sikkimense

A highly ornamental, but confused species as previous collections into cultivation were from less favourable areas for hardiness. Forming medium-sized trees in the wild 7-10m tall clothed with 15cm long very shallowly lobed ovate-elliptic leathery leaves. Which slowly transform to a dark glossy-green, in cultivation turning crimson in autumn. Bearing long dense pendant racemes approximately 1.5 the length of the leaves, of small plump seed with 2cm long samaras held at a wide angle 130°, running in several parallel lines with the raceme rachis. From one of our collections on the Fansipu trail in northern Vietnam at almost 2,000m in 2011. Best grown in a fertile drained soil with shelter from freezing winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) WWJ11853

sikkimense

From a collection gathered on the cool mountain pass of Trum Tron northern Vietnam while awaiting Peter Wharton, in the autumn of 2007 at 1950m. Where it formed a 7m bushy tree with 15cm long shallowly lobed elliptic leaves, which slowly transform to a dark glossy-green above again turning crimson in autumn. Still very scarce in cultivation a semi-evergreen colourful species which has semi-persistent thick-textured foliage in British gardens, where it only forms a large shrub or small tree, with young shoots and leaves emerging a brilliant red. All this graced by long dense pendant racemes of small winged seed when we found it. Best grown in a situation sheltered from freezing winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) WWJ11613

sikkimense

Forming sizeable trees in the wild with 15cm long shallowly lobed elliptic leaves, which slowly transform to a dark glossy-green above again turning crimson in autumn. Still very scarce in cultivation a semi-evergreen colourful species which has semi-persistent thick-textured foliage in British gardens, where it only forms a large shrub or small tree, with young shoots and leaves emerging a brilliant red. All this graced by long dense pendant racemes of small winged seed when we found it, in the cool mountain Séo Mí Tý of northern Vietnam with Peter Wharton, in the autumn of 2006 at 1800m. Best grown in a situation sheltered from freezing winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) WJC13674

sikkimense

A rare and ornamental shrubby tree, which has been considered to be tender, but unlikely to be so as this collection from the eastern Himalayas at an altitude of 3,000m will prove. Most likely described as a variety of A. hookeri originally, this form differs greatly to our Vietnamese forms, with more rounded and even less lobed leaves which are decidedly deciduous. Meanwhile the seed and samaras are larger held in tight V shaped (less than 90°) pairs, in shorter clustered spikes approximately the same length as the leaves. Easily grown in a fertile moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun, best sheltered from cold drying winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) WJC13706

sikkimense

Most likely originally described as a variety of A. hookeri, this form differing greatly from our Vietnamese collections, with more rounded and even less lobed decidedly deciduous leaves with long acuminate tips. An ornamental species long considered to be tender, but unlikely to be so as this collection from a cold valley in eastern Himalayas, gathered from an altitude of 2,855m. Where it only formed shrubby trees, bearing larger seed and samaras held in tight V shaped (less than 90°) pairs, in shorter clustered spikes approximately the same length as the leaves. Easily grown in a fertile moisture retentive soil in part shade to sun, best sheltered from freezing drying winds.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8500

takesimense

Our particular favourite which we collected from the remote Korean island of Ullüngdõ, where we collected the seed from small wizened trees growing on the summit of the domineering extinct volcano. A slow growing species exhibiting its outstanding autumnal coloration with sharply 11-13 lobed leaves. Easily grown in any good well drained soil in part shade to sun and shelter from drying winds. Hardy to -25C. 30l+ size ***** ****** ***** ***** ***** **** When we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants can only be supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants when dormant, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8540

takesimense

Our particular favourite which we collected from the remote Korean island of Ullüngdõ, where we collected the seed from a small tree growing on the slopes of the domineering extinct volcano. A slow growing species exhibiting its outstanding autumnal coloration with sharply 11-13 lobed leaves. Easily grown in any good well drained soil in part shade to sun and shelter from drying winds. Hardy to -25C. **** ****** **** **** **** **** *** This plant is only supplied as an open ground/bare-rooted plant, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8500

takesimense

Our particular favourite which we collected from the remote Korean island of Ullüngdõ, where we collected the seed from small wizened trees growing on the summit of the domineering extinct volcano. A slow growing species exhibiting its outstanding autumnal coloration with sharply 11-13 lobed leaves. Easily grown in any good well drained soil in part shade to sun and shelter from drying winds. Hardy to -25C. **** ***** ***** **** Larger plants are available as open ground/bare-rooted specimens for the same price, during the winter months when the plants are dormant.

Acer (Aceraceae) DJHV06173

tonkinense ssp. liquidambarifolium

One of Dan Hinkley's collections of this fantastic hitherto new species to general cultivation, gathered in the north of Vietnam in 2006. Where it had formed a medium sized evergreen tree to 15m tall, clothed in thick-textured distinctly tri-lobed evergreen leaves which were 'taking on good autumn tones'. As well as the juvenile growth which was conspicuously pink tinted. Best grown in shelter from cold drying winds virtually frost free.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ8806

truncatum v. barbinerve

From seed we gathered from the island of Cheju-do South Korea on our collecting trip in the autumn of 2001. From a medium sized tree to 10m tall with sharply 7-lobed glossy leaves, sometimes purple tinted, growing in an open situation close to water. Easily grown in any type of moisture retentive fertile drained soil in part shade to sun. ****************************** This plant can only be supplied as open ground/bare-rooted when dormant, for collection only as it is too tall for our carriers to handle.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12583

tschonoskii ssp. koreanum

A tough and easily grown species, which we collected seed from the exceptionally cold T'aebaeksan area of the mountainous interior in the north of South Korea in 2010, at around 1,000m. Only forming a small tree in time, with white striped bark and conspicuously dark red to green young branches. Bearing palmate deeply five to tri-lobed sharply serrated leaves on red petioles. With short pendant spikes of paired large winged seed held late summer autumn. Best grown out of strong winds to protect the foliage, in most types of fertile drained soils.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12596

tschonoskii ssp. koreanum

From seed we collected from the exceptionally cold T'aebaeksan area of the mountainous interior in the north of South Korea in 2010, at over a 1,340m. Only forming a small tree in time, with white striped bark and conspicuously dark red to green young branches. Bearing palmate deeply five to tri-lobed sharply serrated leaves on red petioles. With short pendant spikes of paired large winged seed held late summer autumn. A tough and easily grown species, but best grown out of strong winds to protect the foliage, in most types of fertile drained soils.

Acer (Aceraceae) BSWJ12603

tschonoskii ssp. koreanum

An extremely tough and adaptable species we collected seed of from the T'aebaeksan area of the mountainous interior in the north of South Korea in 2010, at over a 1,000m. Only forming a small tree in time, with white striped bark and conspicuously dark red to green young branches. Bearing palmate deeply five to tri-lobed sharply serrated leaves on red petioles. With the pendant spikes of paired large winged seed held late summer autumn. A tough and easily grown species, but best grown out of strong winds to protect the foliage, in most types of fertile drained soils. **** **** **** **** **** **** **** ** This plant can only be supplied as open ground/bare-rooted, for collection only as it is too tall for our carriers to handle.

Achlys (Berberidaceae)

japonica

Japanese woodland perennial with leaves having three shallow lobes, on slender stems, arising from scaly, creeping rhizomes. Flowers, white in spikes just above the foliage April-June. For moist leafy soil in part shade.

Achlys (Berberidaceae)

triphylla

North American woodland perennial with leaves having three shallow lobes, on slender stems, arising from scaly, creeping rhizomes. Flowers, white in spikes just above the foliage April-June. For moist leafy soil in part shade.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BWJ8055

aff. vilmorinianum

A climbing perennial species I collected seed of from the slopes of E'meishan Sichuan in 2000. Where it twined up small trees and large shrubs to 3m tall, bearing large palmate lower leaves. With plentiful axillary inflorescences in the upper parts, of long stemmed pale-deep blue elongated flowers from late July on into autumn. Best grown into the sun while the roots are shaded, in the same way as Clematis, in a fertile drained soil with added humus to retain moisture.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8820

albo-violaceum v. albiflorum

A robust shortly climbing monkshood species, we found growing on a shaded, well drained wooded hillside, at Ch'õllip'o, South Korea. From a tuberous root with large rounded basal leaves, 3m stems with broad foliage, bear from August-frost generous quantities of white elongated flowers. Best in shade growing into sun, any good soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8477

albo-violaceum v. purpurea

From seed we collected close to Chiaksan, South Korea in 2001. Where we found this species growing in a steep well drained forest close at 350m. Forming enormous rounded basal leaves, from a tuberous root with 3m weakly twining stems of broad mottled foliage, bearing August-frost generous spikes of lilac-purple white tinged elongated flowers. Best in shade growing into sun, in any type of good humus rich fertile soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ774

arcuatum

A monkshood we found growing at the base of steep wooded hillsides at T'aebaeksan, S. Korea. In cultivation it clambers through shrubs and small trees to almost 2m, with generous quantities of terminal and axillary racemes of deep purple-blue helmets. Sun or shade in a drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7902

austroyunnanense

A climbing perennial species I collected seed of from the Western Heights overlooking Kunming, Yunnan. Where it twined up scrub and over large rocks to 3m tall, bearing large three-parted palmate leaves. With generous axillary inflorescences of long stemmed deep blue tinged purple flowers 5cm long, primarily composed of a large upper helmet-shaped petal. Coming into flower in late July. Best growing into the sun any good soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2120

bulbilliferum

An unusual and rare climbing monkshood with slender twining stems to 3m long, emerging from a tuberous root. Bearing small deeply divided foliage on dark petioles, which produce small clusters of bulbils in their axils when growing happily. The distinctly purple hood-shaped flowers are borne on axillary and terminal inflorescences in late summer. A plant for exacting conditions which we collected at around 3,000m altitude from cool moist shade close to a fast running stream, close to the Tibetan border in eastern Nepal in 2002 with Dan Hinkley et al.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9393

chasmanthum

A species of monkshood we found growing on open, well drained mountain sides, at around 3,100m on the Singalila Ridge, the border between Eastern Nepal and Northern Indian. Seed collected from plants 1.3m tall, with long terminal racemes of blue helmet-shaped flowers, and divided foliage. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any kind of drained soil. Keep roots cool or the plant goes dormant prematurely.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ4446

chiisanense

A tuberous rooted monkshood we found growing on wooded, well drained hill sides, on Cheju-Dõ, an island well to the south of South Korea. In cultivation the smooth, purple stems have attained 1m height, with terminal and axillary racemes of rounded deep-blue white stained flowers. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae)

episcopale

A flamboyant climbing monkshood emerging from tuberous roots with strongly twining stems to 3m long. Carrying slender branched stems of elegant deeply divided foliage, bearing from August-frost an abundance of deep blue hooded flowers in generous panicles. Easily grown with the roots in cool shade in a moisture retentive fertile soil allowing the top growth to bask in sun. Large plants.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9403

ferox from northern India

A species of monkshood we found growing on open, well drained mountain top, at around 3,650m at Sandakphu on the border between Eastern Nepal and Northern Indian. Where we collected the seed from plants 1.3m tall with deeply divided foliage. A result of the dark purple-blue hooded rounded and beaked flowers, with pale lower bracts held in a terminal spike. Essential to grown in cool conditions in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9333

ferox from Sikkim

Originating from seed we collected at 3525m altitude in the upper reaches of the Lachung Valley in northern Sikkim in 2002. Where this species of monkshood had formed a sizeable colony growing on a well drained overgrazed pasture. Where we collected the seed from plants 2m tall (shorter in gardens) with the remnants of deeply divided foliage. A result of the dark purple-blue hooded rounded and beaked flowers, with pale lower bracts held in a terminal spike. Essential to be grown in cool conditions in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8809

fischeri

A charming small species where we found this plant growing on the island of Chejudõ off the south coast of South Korea in 2001. Bearing deeply divided dark green leaves the lobes round-ended, with terminal and axillary short spikes of blue purple-tinged helmet flowers August-September. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil that is drained in winter and not too hot in summer, sun to part shade.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ3057

formosanum

Perennial scandent monkshood we found climbing onto shrubs at the edge of a forest in Northern Taiwan. There it attained a height of 2-3mts. Flowers in terminal racemes, violet sometimes mixed with white. Best grown in drained soil, with the top of the plant in sun.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ337

fukutomei

A monkshood we found growing on shaded, well drained mountain sides, at around 3,100m in Taiwan. In cultivation it has attained 1m, with a long terminal raceme of purple/blue helmets. Syn. A. bartlettii

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae)

hemsleyanum

A climbing monkshood, vigorous twining species, to 3-5m. Tuberous roots produce slender stems with ferny foliage, bearing from August-frost an abundance of blue-purple flowers. Best in sun any good soil. Strong plants.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8741

jaluense

Bearing the largest flowers we have yet seen, a species we found growing on the island of Kõjedõ, South Korea. Where it carpeted the ground as far as the eye could see, on wooded well drained hill sides. We collected seed from plants with 1m long lax arching stems, with large 5- foliate leaves bearing upright axially racemes of bright blue hooded flowers. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6228

japonicum ssp. subcuneatum

A monkshood we found growing on wooded, well drained hill sides, on the high mountains of Shikoku, Japan. Seed collected from plants arching to 1m bearing large deeply divided leaves. In cultivation the smooth, purple stems have terminal and axillary racemes of large deep-blue flowers with rounded hoods. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ5507

japonicum var. montanum

A charming small species monkshood we found growing on densely wooded, well drained hill sides, on the high mountains of the Kii Peninsular, Japan in 1998. The seed was collected from plants arching to 80cm long bearing deeply divided tri-foliate leaves and short axillary spikes of sky-blue helmeted flowers all along the stems. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil that is drained in winter and not too hot in summer, sun to part shade.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11173

kitadakense

A small to medium sized species we found growing in a small colony at the edge of a large forested area of Ehime in the cold mountains of Shikoku (island), Japan in the autumn of 2005. Where they formed plants with arching stems to 60cm tall in the lightly shaded conditions, with deeply lobed palmate leaves and sizeable terminal inflorescences of seed capsules the result of the sizeable blue-purple hooded flowers carried July-September. Easily grown in sun or shade, in any type of fertile drained soil, best if the roots are kept cool.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9254

laciniatum

From seed we collected at Thongdu a frozen village high in the Sikkim area of the Himalayas. Where this robust species formed a sizeable colony in-between strewn boulders on the outskirts of the village at 3870m. Forming plants to 1.5m tall with deeply lobed leaves to 15cm across and lax terminal racemes of white blue-edged helmet-shaped flowers 3.5 x 1.7 cm, on stalks to 7 cm long. Essential to grown in cool conditions in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9324

laciniatum

A tall erect tuberous perennial that we collected at 3,500m in the Lachung Valley, Eastern Sikkim. With stems to 2m bearing deeply lobed and shallowly toothed leaves, topped by large branching spikes of white, yellow tinged and bright blue edged flowers which are roundish. Essential to grown in cool conditions in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11529

loczyanum

A choice relatively small gregarious species where we found this perennial forming a wide colony of upright brown-black stems to around a meter tall with dark green mottled deeply divided palmate foliage. With dense terminal panicles of what would have been elongated purple-white helmet-shaped flowers July to September. From one of our seed collections gathered from an open exposed Õnogahara Plateau, Shikoku Island Japan at 1100m in the autumn of 2006. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil that is drained in winter and not too hot in summer, sun to part shade.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8712

loczyanum from Korea

A wonderful shortly twining species of monkshood, emerging from a distinctly tuberous root with large palmate shallowly lobed basal leaves, with stout scandent stems to 1.5m long bearing dense terminal spikes of elongated helmet-shaped flowers from July-frost. From one of our seed collections gathered from the cold mountainous area of Chirisan South Korea in 2001, where it grew on a shaded well drained forested hillside. Best in shade growing into sun, in any type of moisture retentive fertile soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8486

longicassidatum

A robust shortly climbing monkshood species, we found growing on a shaded, well drained coniferous hillside, at Chiaksan, South Korea. From a tuberous root with large rounded basal leaves, bearing 3m twinning stems with rounded foliage and from August-frost upright spikes with generous quantities of white elongated flowers. Best in shade growing into sun, any good soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ4277

longicassidatum

A robust shortly climbing monkshood species, we found growing on a shaded, well drained wooded hillside, at Chuwangsan, South Korea. From a tuberous root with large rounded basal leaves, 3m stems with broad foliage, bear from August-frost generous quantities of white elongated flowers. Best in shade growing into sun, any good soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ943

napiforme

A very distinct species which is cited under this name in the Flora of Korea, as a compact clump-forming perennial only 30-50cm tall. Carrying the distinct congested terminal racemes of purple-blue helmet flowers August to September, above the small palmate deeply divided, but shallowly lobed leaves. Which we found growing on steep wooded damp hill sides, in the Odaesan area of South Korea in the autumn of 1993. Easily grown in light to deep shade in any type of drained fertile soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ4107

proliferum

A monkshood we found growing on a shaded, well drained wooded hillside, at Ch'õllip'o, S. Korea. Seed collected from plants 1m tall, with congested terminal racemes of rounded purple-blue hooded flowers. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8663

pseudo laeve

A wonderful new shortly climbing species monkshood, we found growing on a shaded, well drained shrubby hillside, on T'aebaeksan, a cold mountain in South Korea. From a distinctly tuberous root with rounded basal leaves, bearing 3m long twinning bristly stems with from July-frost upright spikes of pink white-tipped elongated flowers. Best in shade growing into sun, any good soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8466

pseudo laeve v. erectum

From one of our seed collections gathered from the cold mountainous area of Odaesan South Korea in 2001, accompanied by Andrea Jones. A wonderful new shortly climbing species of monkshood, which grew on a shaded well drained forested hillside. From a distinctly tuberous root with large rounded basal leaves, bearing scandent bristly stems to 2m long with terminal spikes of elongated white purple-tinted helmet flowers from July-frost. Best in shade growing into sun, in any type of moisture retentive fertile soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11032

sennanense v. incisum

From below a stand of conifers in the mountains of western Japan. Where this relatively short upright species to 1m tall formed small colonies, with terminal inflorescences of bright blue helmets, above the deeply lobed leaves from July to October. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil that is drained in winter and not too hot in summer, sun to part shade.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ10866

sennanense v. paludicola

A robust species we found growing in a large colony within a large forested area of Hakkodoshan in the cold north of Honshu, Japan in the autumn of 2005. Where they formed plants with long arching stems to 2m long in the shaded conditions, with large shallowly lobed leaves and large terminal panicles/or axillary racemes of short seed capsules the result of the sizeable blue-purple hooded flowers carried July-September. Easily grown in sun or shade, in any type of fertile drained soil, best if the roots are kept cool.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ864

seoulense

A monkshood we found growing on a shaded, well drained hillside under a coniferous wood at Ch'õllip'o, S. Korea. Seed collected from plants 1m tall, but attaining almost double in our garden, with terminal racemes of long hooded blue flowers, held on bristly stems. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ694

seoulense

A monkshood we found growing on a shaded, well drained hillside under a coniferous wood at Ch'õllip'o, S. Korea. Seed collected from plants 1m tall, but attaining almost double in our garden, with terminal racemes of long hooded blue flowers, held on bristly stems. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) CNDS036

sp. from Burma

From wild collected seed sent to us by Charles Nelson, which he collected in grassland with scattered pine and Rhododendron on Mount Victoria, Burma. A perennial species to 1m tall from tuberous roots, with dark violet-blue helmet flowers. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9394

spicatum

A species of monkshood we found growing on open, well drained mountain sides, at around 3,100m on the Singalila Ridge, the border between Eastern Nepal and Northern Indian. Un-flowered for us yet, but seed collected from plants 1.3m tall, with long terminal branched racemes, and deeply divided foliage. Essential to grown in cool conditions in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ1216

uchiyamai

A tuberous rooted monkshood we found growing on wooded, well drained hill sides, on Chejudõ, South Korea. In cultivation the smooth, purple stems have attained 1m, with terminal and axillary racemes of large deep-blue flowers with crumpled hoods. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ1005

uchiyamai

A monkshood we found growing on wooded, well drained hill sides, on Kõjedõ, South Korea. Seed collected from plants 1m tall, with racemes of blue flowers. In cultivation the smooth, purple stems have attained 1m, with terminal and axillary racemes of large deep-blue flowers with crumpled hoods. Sun or shade in any drained soil.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae)

yamazaki

A slender clump forming perennial species from the mountainous areas of Japan, with sparsely branched stems. Bearing deeply divided palmate leaves on stems to 1m tall, with short terminal racemes of blue-purple flowers. Any good soil in sun to part shade.

Aconitum (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8906

zigzag v. ryohakuense

Found growing in a small colony within the high altitudinal forest of Mt. Ohmineyama, in the Kinki District of Japan in the autumn of 2001. With arching stems to 1m tall bearing a panicle of blue-helmet shaped flowers held in small clusters. Easily grown in sun or shade, in any type of fertile drained soil, best if the roots are kept cool.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) WJC13720

aff. foetida

From one of our seed collections gathered from a deep wide valley in the eastern Himalayas at over 3,400m in 2013. A much smaller species at only around 1m tall, than the A. frigida we had seen lower, with short branched inflorescences of clustered white and yellow flowers held in racemes. These were maturing to purple carpels on this collection, splitting and being blown in the breeze. Best grown in cool conditions in a well drained soil with some moisture retention in part shade. Syn. Cimicifuga

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

alba = pachypoda

See Actaea pachypoda

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

arizonica

A rarely encountered North American species, introduced into cultivation by Dr. James Compton, from a deep canyon in the middle of the Arizona desert. With shortly creeping rhizomes bearing 1-1.2m tall upright branching stems, with divided and serrated foliage below the upright spikes of white bottle-brush like flowers August-Sept. Best grown in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention, in full-part shade.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) DJHC787

asiatica

One of Dan Hinkley's seed collections from E'meishan Sichuan China, of a very distinct and robust form of this remarkable species. Where the plants grew in moist forest, with upright stems to a meter tall bearing large terminal spikes of glossy black berries, borne on stiff fleshy bright pink pedicells from summer into autumn. Easily grown in any kind of fertile drained moisture retentive soil in part to full shade.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ616

asiatica

Compact, clump forming, perennial with spikes of small, fluffy, white flowers in summer and clusters of glossy black berries, borne on stiff fleshy bright pink pedicells from summer into autumn. Height 40-70cm. Spread 50cm. Shade tolerant.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BWJ8174

asiatica from China

From a very distinctly robust form of this remarkable species I collected seed of from the mountains to the north of Baoxing, Sichuan China. Where the plants were to be found growing in very moist forest, with upright stems to a meter tall bearing large terminal spikes of glossy black berries, borne on stiff fleshy bright pink pedicells from summer into autumn. Easily grown in any kind of fertile drained moisture retentive soil in part to full shade.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11190

biternata

An impressive perennial, from shortly creeping rhizomes with 1.2m upright branching stems, bearing bi-ternate (twice divided into 3) green leaves which are 15cm across in this form. Topped with slender spikes of long bottle-brush like white flowers August-September. For a rich soil in cool full-partial shade. From one of our collection made on the slopes of Fuji-San, Japan. Syn. Cimicifuga

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8573

dahurica

One of the most ornamental species we have collected, yet sadly absent in so many gardens. A dioecious (male or female plants) species which frequent Korean forests with their showy (males more so, sorry girls) terminal panicles of white flowers. Our collection from the Andong area. Best cultivated in a cool position in sun or part shade in a moist but drained soil.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8426

dahurica

A species we collected seed of in the forests of the Soraksan area of eastern Korea. Where it formed sizeable plants to 2m tall with large ternate (split into 3 parts) basal leaves and bearing large diffuse terminal inflorescences, which in late summer into the autumn are full of small white bristly flowers. Best cultivated in a cool position in part shade in a moist but drained soil.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ12561

dahurica

One of the most ornamental species we have collected, yet sadly absent in so many gardens. A dioecious (male or female plants) species which frequent Korean forests with their showy (males more so, sorry girls) terminal panicles of white flowers. Our collection from the Andong area. Best cultivated in a cool position in sun or part shade in a moist but drained soil.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11136

japonica

From a short perennial rhizome with 1.3m upright stems, bearing green ternate leaves with upright spikes of scented bottle-brush like white flowers August-September. For a well drained soil enriched with humus in full-part shade. A species, which we collected seed of from the western area of northern Kyushu, Japan in 2005. Syn. Cimicifuga japonica.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11526

japonica

From one of our seed collections gathered in the autumn of 2006 from the cold mountains of Ehime northern Shikoku Japan. Collected from small plants with upright stems to less than a meter tall, bearing green palmate leaves with upright spikes of scented bottle-brush like white flowers August-September. For a well drained soil enriched with humus in full-part shade. Syn. Cimicifuga.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11059

japonica

From one of our seed collections gathered in the autumn of 2005 from the mountains of Hiroshima southern Honshu Japan. From a short perennial rhizome with 1.3m upright stems, bearing green ternate leaves with upright spikes of scented bottle-brush like white flowers August-September. For a well drained soil enriched with humus in full-part shade. Syn. Cimicifuga

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ5828

japonica

A perennial species, which we collected from the Asõ Crater area of Central Kyushu, Japan. With a short rhizomes from which 60cm upright stems, bare green ternate leaves with upright spikes of scented bottle-brush like white flowers Aug-Sept. For a well drained soil in full-part shade.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11070

japonica

From a short perennial rhizome with 1.3m upright stems, bearing green ternate leaves with upright spikes of scented bottle-brush like white flowers August-September. From one of our seed collections gathered in the autumn of 2005 from the mountains of Hiroshima southern Honshu Japan. For a well drained soil enriched with humus in full-part shade. Syn. Cimicifuga

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8758a

japonica from Chejudõ

A diminutive form of this highly desirable perennial species that we collected seed from the isolated island of Chejudõ, South Korea. From plants that were only 10cm tall in flower, where they were growing in dense forest in a rocky dried up river-bed. Forming a short rhizome bearing upright stems of green ternate leaves with upright spikes of scented bottle-brush like white flowers Aug-Sept. For a well drained soil in full-part shade. Syn. A. japonica v. acerina/ Cimicifuga acerina.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6257

japonica v. acutiloba

An unusual variety of a perennial species, which we collected from the Mount Daisen area of Southern Honshu, Japan. Emerging from a short rhizome forming upright stems to 120cm tall bearing ternate acutely lobed leaves in this variety, which emerge distinctly grey with deep red venation in early spring, later producing upright spikes of scented bottle-brush like white flowers from July into September. For a cool well drained soil in full-part shade.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7947

mairei

From seed I collected from a short plant with a stem to only 1m tall bearing doubly pinnate leaves to .75m across and a terminal cylindrical panicle of distinctly creamy-yellow flowers, in late summer. Gathered from Suda Lake, an area close to Zhongdian in Western Yunnan, China in 2000, taking all of four years to germinate. Easily cultivated in sun or part shade in a well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Cimicifuga. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7939

mairei

One of my seed collections from Suda Lake, an area close to Zhongdian in Western Yunnan, China in 2000, taking all of four years to germinate. Where it formed a short plant with a stem to only 1m tall bearing doubly pinnate leaves to .75m across and a terminal cylindrical panicle of distinctly creamy-yellow flowers, in late summer. Easily cultivated in sun or part shade in a well drained soil that can retain some moisture. ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7635

mairei

From my seed collection made in the Birong Valley China in 2000, taking four years to germinate. A scarce spices in cultivation, which we first introduced from Nepal. Forming a tall perennial to 2m, with large divided basal leaves, the leaflets narrow and sharply toothed. Flowering in long arching yellowish branched inflorescences, late summer. Easily grown in any kind of fertile drained soil in part shade. ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7787

mairei

A seed collection I made in the Lijiang area of China in 2000, taking four years to germinate. A scarce spices in cultivation, which we first introduced from Nepal. Forming a tall perennial to 3m, with large divided basal leaves, the leaflets narrow and sharply toothed. Flowering in long arching yellowish inflorescences, late summer. Easily grown in any kind of fertile drained soil in part shade. ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7649

mairei

From a seed collection I made in Western Sichuan, China in 2000, taking all of four years to germinate. Where it grew in a steep clearing within a dry pine mountain forest at 3670m. Forming a tall stem to 1.7m tall with large doubly pinnate leaves to 1m across. Bearing terminal cylindrically branched panicles of distinctly creamy-yellow flowers, in late summer. Easily cultivated in sun or part shade in a well drained soil that can retain some moisture.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7952

mairei

One of my seed collections from a very steep sided Shika Shan, a mountain close to Zhongdian in Western Yunnan, China in 2000, taking all of four years to germinate. Where it formed a tall plant with a stem to 1.7m tall bearing large doubly pinnate leaves to 1m across and terminal cylindrically branched panicles of distinctly creamy-yellow flowers, in late summer. Easily cultivated in sun or part shade in a well drained soil that can retain some moisture. ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11187

matsumurae

Only forming a small plant with 1 m (1.5 in our garden) upright few branched stems bearing long spikes of bottle-brush like white flowers September-November. From shortly creeping rhizomes from which a basal clump of arching divided leaves is formed. A collection, that we gathered from the forests of Shizuoka, in the shadow of Fuji-San (Mt. Fuji) Japan, in the autumn of 2005. A scarce species that is easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Syn. Cimicifuga.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11528

matsumurae

A scarce species in the wild where we collected the seed of this imposing species, on the island of Shikoku Japan in the autumn of 2005, at 1000m in the cold mountains of Ehime. Where they formed plants with a basal clump of divided arching leaves with an erect rarely branched flowering stem to 1.5m tall. Bearing a mass of small white staminate flowers in a long terminal spike, later than most specie September to November. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil with some moisture retention in sun or part shade. Syn. Cimicifuga

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11015

matsumurae

An imposing perennial, from shortly creeping rhizomes from which a basal clump of arching divided leaves is formed, with upright stems arising bearing arching spikes of long bottle-brush like scented white flowers to 1m tall in this collection September-November. From one of our seed collections gathered in the cold Mt. Yotsudake area of Honshu, Japan in the autumn of 2005. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Syn. Cimicifuga.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

pachypoda

A conspicuous clump forming, woodland perennial with stems of divided leaves bearing spikes of small scented fluffy creamy-white flowers in late spring to early summer. Which mature by late summer into unusual plump white black spotted berries, earning it the vernacular name of Dolly’s Eyes, borne on contrasting red fleshy short stalks well into autumn. Height 1m. Spread 75cm. Easily grown in full to part shade in any type of moisture retentive well drained soil.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

podocarpa

Syn. Cimicifuga americana. A rarely encountered north-east American species growing from shortly creeping rhizomes. Found mainly in mountainous areas, with 1-1.6m tall upright branching stems, bearing bold foliage and slender upright spikes of snowy-white bottle-brush like flowers August-September. Easily grown in a rich soil in full-part shade.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ9555

rubra

Long cultivated and cherished by those who are familiar with the attributes this very shade tolerant clump forming perennial enriches our woodland gardens with. Bearing short creamy-white dumpy spikes of small fluffy flowers in early summer, followed by clusters of sealing wax red berries borne on stiff fleshy stalks held long into the autumn. From seed we collected from the Olympic Mountains of the Pacific North West United States in 2003. Height to1m, spread 50cm. Easily grown in light to dense shade in any kind of fertile drained soil.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

rubra

Compact, clump forming, perennial with spikes of small, fluffy, white flowers in summer and clusters of sealing wax red berries, borne on stiff fleshy stalks from summer into autumn. Height 1m. Spread 50cm. Shade tolerant.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

rubra f. neglecta

Compact, clump forming, perennial with spikes of small, fluffy, white flowers April to June. Followed by clusters of white berries, borne on stiff fleshy white stalks into the autumn. Height 80cm. Spread 50cm. Shade tolerant.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

rubra pink form

An unusual selection of this compact, clump forming, perennial with a wide spread distribution in the wild. With divided leaves on slender upright stems and broad spikes of small fluffy white flowers in spring and early summer which develop to clusters of bright pink rounded berries, held on stiff fleshy stalks from summer into autumn. Height 1m. Spread 50cm. Easily grown in part to full shade in any kind of drained fertile soil.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ10957

simplex

The tallest form of this perennial species, which we have so far encountered in the wild. Emerging from sturdy shortly creeping rhizomes from which a basal clump of arching divided leaves is formed. With 2+ m upright branching stems bearing spikes of long bottle-brush like white flowers August-September, in this collection we gathered from the snowy forests of Togakushi, Nagano Japan, in the autumn of 2005. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Syn. Cimicifuga.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11133

simplex

From one of our seed collections from Oita on the island of Kyushu Japan in 2005. A small form of this perennial species, with shortly creeping rhizomes from which a basal clump of arching divided leaves is formed, with 45 cm upright stems bearing spikes of long bottle-brush like white flowers August-September. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Syn. Cimicifuga. ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** ***** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ10964

simplex

A tall form of this species, which we collected the seed of from the forest edge from the snowy forests of Togakushi, Nagano Japan, in the autumn of 2005.Where this strongly perennial species emerges from sturdy shortly creeping rhizomes from which a basal clump of arching divided leaves is formed. With 2m upright branching stems bearing spikes of scented long bottle-brush like white flowers August-September. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Syn. Cimicifuga.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8664

simplex

An impressive perennial, with shortly creeping rhizomes from which 2m upright branching stems, bare green leaves and buds with upright spikes of long bottle-brush like white flowers Aug-Sept. For a rich soil in full-part shade. From our seed collection from T'aebaeksan a cold mountainous area of South Korea.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8653

simplex

An impressive perennial, with shortly creeping rhizomes from which 2m upright branching stems, bare green leaves and buds with upright spikes of long bottle-brush like white flowers Aug-Sept. For a rich soil in full-part shade. From our seed collection from T'aebaeksan a cold mountainous area of South Korea.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

simplex 'Atropurpurea'

An impressive perennial, with shortly creeping rhizomes from which 2m upright branching stems, bare purplish leaves and buds with upright spikes of bottle-brush like white flowers Aug-Sept. For a rich soil in full-part shade.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

spicata

Compact, clump forming, perennial with spikes of small, fluffy, white flowers in summer and clusters of red turning black berries, borne on stiff fleshy stalks from summer into autumn. Height 1m. Spread 50cm. Shade tolerant.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae)

spicata native form

A native form of this compact, clump forming, perennial with spikes of small, fluffy, white flowers in early summer and clusters of red ripening to black berries, borne on stiff fleshy stalks from summer into autumn. Height 1m. Spread 50cm. Easily grown in full to part shade in a well drained soil.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) RWJ9996

taiwanensis

A newly described perennial species, which we collected from the high mountains of Southern Taiwan. With creeping rhizomes from which 1.5m upright branching stems, bare green leaves and buds with upright spikes of scented bottle-brush like white flowers Aug-Sept. For a rich soil in full-part shade. Syn. Cimicifuga

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6355

yesoensis

From our collection in the Mt. Daisen area of Honshu, Japan. An impressive perennial, with shortly creeping rhizomes from which 2m upright branching stems, bare green divided leaves and buds with undulating spikes of long bottle-brush like white flowers, which open from the apex down, July- August. For a rich soil in full-part shade.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ10860

yesoensis

From one of our seed collections gathered in the cold Hakkodoshan area of northern Honshu, Japan in the autumn of 2005. An impressive perennial, from shortly creeping rhizomes from which upright branching stems arose, with divided thin textured leaves and upright spikes of long bottle-brush like white flowers to 1.2m tall August-September in this collection. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Syn. Cimicifuga.

Actaea (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ10860

yesoensis

From one of our seed collections gathered in the cold Hakkodoshan area of northern Honshu, Japan in the autumn of 2005. An impressive perennial, from shortly creeping rhizomes from which upright branching stems arose, with divided thin textured leaves and upright spikes of long bottle-brush like white flowers to 1.2m tall August-September in this collection. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Syn. Cimicifuga.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) FMWJ13137

aff. petelotii

From one of our 2011 seed collection, of this conspicuous species where we found it growing strongly with long new growth covered in red bristly hairs. Clothed in 10cm long lanceolate dark green glabrous leaves which were glaucous below. Bearing a huge quantity of small fruit 2cm across in large wide panicles. Best grown in a bit of shelter from the coldest weather, with the base in some shade while the top could grow into the sun, in a moisture retentive drained soil. Height 7m.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) HWJK2367

aff. strigosa

A small deciduous woody stemmed twining climber, to only 4 m tall. Bearing ovate -oblong slightly hairy leaves 10-15cm long, with acuminate tips. Flowering May-June in 2-4 flowered cymes, white opening to 2cm across, later producing ovoid fruit to 3cm long, if pollinated. This is a new species to cultivation that we collected seed of in the Mewa Khola Eastern Nepal. Easily grown in any fertile soil with the top in sun.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) WJC13807

aff. strigosa

From seed we collected on the eastern Himalayas in the autumn of 2013 at almost 3,000m. A medium sized deciduous woody stemmed twining climber, to approximately 7 m tall. Bearing ovate-oblong slightly hairy leaves 10-15cm long, with acuminate tips. Flowering May-July in 2-5 flowered cymes, white opening to 2cm across, later producing ovoid fruit to 3cm long, if pollinated. Easily grown in any fertile soil with the top in sun.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) WJC13662

aff. strigosa

A small sized deciduous woody stemmed twining climber, to approximately 4 m tall. Bearing ovate-oblong slightly hairy leaves 10cm long, with acuminate tips. Flowering May-July in 2-5 flowered cymes, white opening to 2cm across, later producing ovoid fruit to 3cm long, if pollinated. From seed we collected in the eastern Himalayas in the autumn of 2013 at almost 3,000m. Easily grown in any fertile soil with the top in sun.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ6155

arguta

From one of our collections made on Kyushu, Japan, a hardy deciduous, woody stemmed twining climber. The leaves are 10cm long on pink stems. Male plants bear masses of cup shaped, white fragrant flowers, while the flowers on female plants are followed by edible strawberry-flavoured yellow kiwi fruits, if pollinated. Best planted with the base in some shade with the top growth in sun, in any good soil. Unsexed plants.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ4592

arguta

Deciduous, woody stemmed twining climber. Frost hardy. The leaves are 10cm long on pink stems. In summer bears cup shaped, white fragrant flowers, followed by edible strawberry-flavoured yellow kiwi fruits, if pollinated. Our collection from Chirisan, S. Korea. *************** *************** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, supplied when dormant (winter). The pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ569

arguta 'Shoko' (F)

A deciduous woody stemmed twining climber, which is very hardy. With ovate-orbicular leaves to10cm long on red-pink stalks. Bearing in summer generous quantities of cup-shaped white fragrant flowers in congested panicles, followed by edible strawberry-flavoured ageing to yellow kiwi fruits, if pollinated. Named for our friend Shoko who helped us in South Korea with her husband Unchae. Easily grown in any fertile soil, best with the roots shaded and the top in sun.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ569

arguta 'Unchae' (M)

Named for our friend Unchae who helped us in South Korea with his wife Shoko in 2004. A deciduous woody stemmed twining climber, which is very hardy. With ovate-orbicular leaves to10cm long on red-pink stalks. Bearing in summer masses of small cup-shaped white scented flowers with contrasting black stamen in congested panicles. Easily grown in any fertile soil, best with the roots shaded and the top in sun.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ4455

arguta from Chejudõ

From one of our collections made on the island of Chejudõ South Korea, with Dan Hinkley in 1997. A very hardy deciduous woody stemmed twining climber with ovate leaves that are 10cm long on red stalks. Male plants bear masses of cup shaped, white fragrant flowers, while the flowers on female plants are followed by edible strawberry-flavoured yellow kiwi fruits, if pollinated. Best planted with the base in some shade with the top growth in sun, in any good soil. Unsexed plants.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ8529

arguta from Ullüngdõ

From one of our seed collections made on the remote island of Ullüngdõ South Korea in 2001. A very hardy deciduous woody stemmed twining climber with ovate leaves that are 10cm long on red stalks. Male plants bear masses of cup shaped, white fragrant flowers, while the flowers on female plants are followed by edible strawberry-flavoured yellow kiwi fruits, if pollinated. Best planted with the base in some shade with the top growth in sun, in any good soil. Unsexed plants.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ3806

callosa v. formosana

Deciduous, woody stemmed twining climber, thrusting forth red bristly new shoots in spring, later opening to long tapering hairy and toothed leaves 15-30cm long. Followed by globose fruit if pollinated. This is a new species that we collected from the Taipingshan area of Taiwan.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ4920

hypoleuca

Hardy woody stemmed, deciduous twining climber. With glabrous stems and branches, bearing oblong leaves with rusty tufts of hairs on their undersides. Bearing cup shaped, white fragrant flowers in summer, followed by edible spotted kiwi fruits, if pollinated. Our collection from Shikoku Island, Japan.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ5574

hypoleuca

Hardy woody stemmed, deciduous twining climber. With glabrous stems and branches, bearing oblong leaves with rusty tufts of hairs on their undersides. Bearing cup shaped, white fragrant flowers in summer, followed by edible spotted kiwi fruits, if pollinated. Our collection from the Kii peninsular, Japan. ****************************** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ5600

hypoleuca

Hardy woody stemmed, deciduous twining climber. With glabrous stems and branches, bearing oblong leaves with rusty tufts of hairs on their undersides. Bearing cup shaped, white fragrant flowers in summer, followed by edible spotted kiwi fruits, if pollinated. Our collection from the Kii peninsular, Japan. ****************************** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ4243

kolomikta

Deciduous, woody stemmed twining climber to 3-4m. One of the few temperate zone plants which has naturally variegated leaves, these occur when the leaves are exposed to direct sunlight for at least part of the day.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ4243

kolomikta 'Tomoko' (F)

The female selection of our collection from Odaesan, South Korea, of this deciduous, woody twining stemmed climber to 3-4m tall. One of the few temperate zone plants which has naturally pink and white variegated leaves, these occur when the leaves are exposed to direct sunlight for at least part of the day. Female lightly scented white flowers are borne in the leaf axils, followed by top-shaped edible fruit by late August here. Easily grown in good light (will burn in too strong sunlight) in a fertile soil with added humus for a bit of moisture retention. Was introduced to British gardens as a hardy fruiting species (hardy to –40C) in mid 1800. Named for our Japanese friend who trained at Wisley in 1995.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ4243

kolomikta 'Yazuaki' (M)

The male selection of our collection from Odaesan, South Korea, of this deciduous, woody twining stemmed climber to 3-4m. One of the few temperate zone plants which has naturally pink and white variegated leaves, these occur when the leaves are exposed to direct sunlight for at least part of the day. Male lightly scented white flowers are borne in the leaf axils in spring. Named for our Japanese friend from Yakushima.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ4243

kolomikta multiple seedlings

Multiple seedlings of this deciduous, woody twining stemmed climber to 3-4m, which should contain both male and female plants. Bearing lightly scented white flowers in the leaf axils, followed by top-shaped edible fruit on the females plants. One of the few temperate zone plants which has naturally pink and white variegated leaves, these occur when the leaves are exposed to direct sunlight for at least part of the day. The original plants were from one of our collection from Odaesan, South Korea gathered in 1997. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun to light shade.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae)

pilosula

A species that has not long been introduced into cultivation from China under the wrong name, grown for its impressive foliage. Which emerges a dark green in spring, turning a silver-white from their tips down through the leaf as the sun warms even an overlay of pink by the end of the summer. Bearing clusters of bowl shaped male pink flowers in spring on long stalks. Best colour in some sun, but will grow in any type of fertile soil, sun or part shade. Only recently re-identified as: A. tetramera var. maloides.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ12564

polygama from Korea

A rarely encountered very tough species, grown for its ornamental silver-white variegated foliage, which develop in summer. Bearing small clusters of large (for the genus) shallowly bowl shaped ice-white highly scented flowers in late spring to early summer. This is a polygamous plant (hence the name). Our field trials have indicated that to produce fruit more than one clone is required to be grown together. This collection gathered in the Soraksan area of north eastern South Korea in the autumn of 2010. Best leaf colour achieved in some sunlight, easily grow in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ8544

polygama from Korea

Our collection from the remote island of Ullüngdõ Korea. A rarely encountered and yet very tough species, grown for its ornamental silver-white variegated foliage, which develop in summer. Clusters of bowl shaped ice-white flowers are borne in late spring, followed by yellow top-shaped fruit when pollinated. Best leaf colour in some sun, will grow in any fertile soil in sun or shade.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ8525

polygama from Korea

A rarely encountered and yet very tough species, grown for its ornamental silver-white variegated foliage, which develop in summer. Clusters of bowl shaped ice-white flowers are borne in late spring, followed by yellow top-shaped fruit when pollinated. Best leaf colour in some sun, will grow in any fertile soil in sun or shade. Our collection from the remote island of Ullüngdõ Korea. ********** ******************** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, supplied when dormant (winter). The pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ3111

rubricaulis

One of our collections from the Lishan area of Taiwan. Deciduous, woody stemmed twining climber to 8m. The shallowly toothed leaves are 10cm round on tan stems. In summer bears cup shaped, white fragrant flowers, followed by edible greenish rounded kiwi fruits, if pollinated.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BSWJ3563

setosa

A deciduous twining woody stemmed climber, originating from seed we collected in the Taipingshan high altitude area of northern Taiwan in 1996. Where it had only formed a relatively small plant climbing over a couple of small trees and shrubs at the edge of the forest, but capable of 8m in ideal conditions. The reddish-brown stems were clothed in rounded-cordate prominently veined hairy leaves around 15cm across. With a few of the rounded fruit densely covered in gingery hairs still held in axils of the older leaves. The Taiwanese are concentrating a lot of effort in selecting fruiting forms because they reckon it will supersede A. deliciosa. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun to light shade.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) BWJ8161

sp. from China

My own collection of this hardy deciduous, woody stemmed strongly twining climber, which I collected along with Dan Hinkley, just north of Baoxing Sichuan, China. Bearing heart shaped decoratively bristly leaves and small edible brown kiwi fruits, densely covered by ginger hairs. Which had been preceded by large cup shaped, white flowers that age creamy yellow. Best planted in sun with adequate moisture to grow.

Actinidia (Actinidiaceae)

tetramera v. maloides

A species that has not long been introduced into cultivation from China under the wrong name only recently re-identified, grown for its impressive foliage. Which emerges a dark green in spring, turning a silver-white from their tips down through the leaf as the sun warms even an overlay of pink by the end of the summer. Bearing clusters of bowl shaped male pink flowers in spring on long stalks. Best colour in some sun, but will grow in any type of fertile soil, sun or part shade. Syn. A. pilosula.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BWJ7998

aff. coelestis

A perennial member of the bellflower family that I found near Zhongdian, China. Attaining a height of 90cm, bearing pale-blue funnel shaped lobed bellflowers June-August. Found growing on open well drained hillsides.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ11018

aff. divaricata

A species we encountered on the cold and high mountains of north western Honshu, Japan, in the area of Toyama, gathered in the autumn of 2005. Where it formed a robust plant to almost 1m tall, with large ovate-elongate leaves and a terminal panicle of sizeable blue funnel-shaped deeply lobed flowers, normally carried from late July to September. Easily grown in most good fertile soils with adequate drainage, in either full sun or light shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10989

aff. remotiflora

A Clump-forming perennial, which is a member of the bellflower family, that we collected seed of in the mountains of Niigata, Japan in 2005. Where we found this species growing on steep banks in part shade at the edge of the forest. Forming clumps of broadly heart-shaped foliage with 70cm stems, bearing blue funnel shaped deeply lobed bellflowers June-August. Easily grown in most types of fertile drained soils in sun or part shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10989

aff. remotiflora

A Clump-forming perennial, which is a member of the bellflower family, that we collected seed of in the mountains of Niigata, Japan in 2005. Where we found this species growing on steep banks in part shade at the edge of the forest. Forming clumps of broadly heart-shaped foliage with 70cm stems, bearing blue funnel shaped deeply lobed bellflowers June-August. Easily grown in most types of fertile drained soils in sun or part shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BWJ7986

capillaris v. leptosepala

A dainty-looking perennial species I collected at high altitude growing in a harsh environment on a steep scree at 3550m near Zhongdian in north-western China in 2000. Forming a clump of slender arching stems to 40cm (60cm in garden), bearing pale-blue curiously inflated bellflowers with long protruding stigmas June-August. Easily grown in any drained fertile soil in sun or light shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ8555

grandiflora

From one of our seed collections made on the remote South Korean offshore island of Ullüngdõ. A perennial member of the bellflower family, which had seeded into tiny cracks on vertical cliffs in a well hidden shady gorge, bearing 2cm long blue funnel shaped bellflowers July-August.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ8562

grandiflora

From one of our seed collections made on the remote South Korean offshore island of Ullüngdõ. A perennial member of the bellflower family, which had seeded into tiny cracks on vertical cliffs in a well hidden shady gorge, bearing 2cm long blue funnel shaped bellflowers July-August.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) HC970317

lamarckii

One of Dan Hinkley's collections from Korea when he accompanied us in '97. A perennial member of the bellflower family attaining a height of 20-40cm, bearing deep blue long cup-shaped bellflowers, with recurved tips July-August. Found growing in cool well drained shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ8738

lamarckii

A small perennial species of the bellflower family, we collected seed of on the island of Kõjedõ, where it grew mixed with scrub and long grass in the open on an exposed mountain top. Forming small tufts of slender stems to 30cm tall with small ovate toothed foliage and terminal spikes of pendant mid-blue flowers held from July-August. Easily grown in any fertile drained soil in full sun or part shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ11008

maximowicziana

Belonging to the bellflower family, a slender perennial species that we found growing in pine forests on the west coast of South Korea. With upright stems to 1.2m tall with narrow toothed leaves held in whirls of 4's, below the elongated and branched inflorescence of pale blue bell-flowers. July-September. Easily adaptable to any drained type of soil sun or shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) RWJ10008

morrisonensis

A dainty sub-alpine perennial species of the bellflower family that has taken us many years to establish from our seed collections. Named after the highest mountain in Taiwan Yushan (was Mount Morrison), which is where we gathered this collection in 2002. Where it forms sizeable colonies on steep well drained slopes, of slender stems with long grassy foliage and sizeable funnel-shaped pendant mid-blue flowers in summer. Easily grown in any fertile drained soil in full sun or part shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ11201

nikoensis f. linearifolia

Arising from thick almost tuberous roots with short wiry stems only 20cm tall, where we found it growing in tight tussocks, at 2315m altitude, on the slopes of the iconic Fuji-San (Mt. Fuji) in the autumn of 2005. With narrow willowy leaves in this form only 3-5cm long by 5-10mm wide. While the stems bore terminal racemes of plump seed capsules subtended/surrounded by a calyx with long slender lobes, resulting from the long blue bell-flowers carried August to September. Best grown in good light in a freely drained soil with some moisture retention.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ11016

remotiflora

A perennial member of the bellflower family that we found close to Mt. Yotsudake in the south west of Japan. Forming neat clumps of narrow foliage and 60cm slender stems, bearing blue funnel shaped deeply lobed bellflowers July-August. Easily grown in most types of fertile soils in sun or part shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ8714

remotiflora

A delightful perennial species of the bellflower family that we found on a high altitude ridge on Mt. Chirisan in the south of South Korea. Forming neat clumps of narrow foliage and 80cm slender stems, bearing blue funnel shaped deeply lobed bellflowers July-August. Easily grown in most types of fertile soils in sun or part shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10825

remotiflora from Japan

From one of our seed collections gathered near Mt. Shibamori, Aomori northern Japan in the autumn of 2005. Closely related to and looking quite similar to Campanula, forming neat clumps of narrow foliage on 60cm slender stems, bearing blue funnel shaped deeply lobed bell flowers June-August. Easily grown in most types of fertile soils in sun or part shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ11424

takedae

A seed collection from a superb mountain ridge we visited on our journey across Shikoku Island Japan in the autumn of 2006. Where the mountain top opened out after we had slowly made our way through rich pickings in the forests below. Here this relatively small species to only 50 cm tall on wiry stems with scattered lanceolate leaves, carried long campanulate pale blue flowers with excerpted stigmas, forming small colonies in the rocky crevices. Easily grown in any fertile drained soil in full sun or part shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10936

triphylla

A tall growing perennial species with upright stems to 1m tall with narrow toothed leaves held in tight whirls of 4's, below the elongated and shortly branched inflorescences of pale blue bell-flowers with exserted stigmas. July-September. From seed we collected in Niigata on the west of Honshu, Japan in 2005. Easily adaptable to any drained type of soil sun or shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10933

triphylla v. japonica

From seed we collected almost on the seashore in Niigata on the west of Honshu, Japan in 2005. A robust perennial species with upright stems to 80cm tall with narrow toothed leaves held in tight whirls of 4's, below the elongated and branched inflorescence of pale blue bell-flowers. July-September. Easily adaptable to any drained type of soil sun or shade.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ6729

uehatae

A perennial alpine member of the bellflower family. Found by ourselves growing on the highest slopes of Hohuanshan, Taiwan in the autumn of 1999. Only attaining a height of 15cm, there in a shaly scree, forming small colonies of suckering stems, bearing spikes of tubby pendant blue flowers.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ126

uehatae

A perennial alpine member of the bellflower family. Found by ourselves growing on the highest slopes of Hohuanshan, Taiwan. Only attaining a height of 15cm, there in a shaly scree, forming small colonies of suckering stems, bearing spikes of long pendant blue flowers.

Adenophora (Campanulaceae) BSWJ8608

verticilliata

Previously listed as A. radiatifolia. A slender airy species bearing tiered cauline (on flowering stem) leaves 2-14 cm long, in whorls of 3-6 up the slender stems to 1.5m tall. Terminating in a large diffuse inflorescence, consisting a panicle of small pendant tubular pale blue flowers constricted at their throats with extruding elongated stigmas, held on slender stalks from May (as early as March in the wild) to November. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or part shade.

Adiantum (Adiantaceae) BSWJ10448

andicola

An elegant clump-forming species with jet-black upright lustrous stipes to 50cm, which we collected from a moist valley in the San Rafael area of Guatemala, in the autumn of 2004. Carrying arching triangular evergreen (under protection) fronds made up of small many triangular thin textured grey green pinnae held on slender purple-brown rachis. Best grown in sheltered shade in a well drained organic soil that does not dry out, only tested to –3C so far.

Adiantum (Adiantaceae) BWJ8184

fimbriatum

A delicate looking species I collected from a small moist copse in a high altitude fertile valley east of Baoxing in 2000. With a creeping habit arising from thread like black rhizomes to fronds held on dark glossy stipes 20cm tall. The fronds triangular in outline 20 Î 25cm 3-4 pinnate, the small triangular greenish grey pinnules fringed on their apex with triangular teeth, held on dark thread-like stalks. Best grown with some shelter from winds in light to dark shade, in a fertile soil that does not dry out.

Aesculus (Hippocastanaceae) WWJ11886

wangii

A rare and endangered species, forming sizeable trees in time with large compound palmate leaves comprised of 5-9 oblanceolate-obovate pointed leaflets on very short stalks. Bearing enormous panicles (to 45cm base) of scented yellow, purple-brown spotted flowers in spring followed by large encased seed to 10cm across. From the exceptionally large seed (conkers) Peter Wharton and I collected from a large tree 25-30m tall, situated in dense mountain forest in northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2007. As the seed is prone to drying it was immediately sown in the open ground on its arrival, where it started to germinate in January.

Agastache (Lamiaceae) BSWJ735

rugosa 'Korean Zest'

A clumping aromatic transient perennial with upright bristly stems, forming a drift of ovate toothed leaves which emerge with a purple tinge, bearing erect spikes of purple/blue flowers, June to Sept. Full sun-part shade well drained soil, associating well with gravelled areas where it can self-seed. Our 1993 collection from South Korea.

Ailanthus (Simaroubaceae) CWJ12452

altissima v. tanakae

A bold tree, grown primarily for its large pinnate leaves. Originating from seed we collected at Wuling Farm, a cool valley in the north of Taiwan, in 2007, where they form very large trees to 30m tall. Only forming much smaller trees when cultivated in British gardens, where we annually pollarded them to encourage young vigorous growth. Which bears large bold pinnate textured leaves to over 1m long on red-stems. Best grown in a warm fertile drained soil in a sunny to partly shaded sight.

Ailanthus (Simaroubaceae) RWJ9906

altissima v. tanakae

From seed we collected by dislodging the winged seed with sticks and scooping them from the ground. At Wuling Farm a cool valley in the north of Taiwan, in 2003, where they form very large trees. Much smaller plants when cultivated in British gardens, here they may be annually pollarded to encourage young vigorous growth, bearing red-stemmed large bold pinnate textured leaves to over 1m long. Best grown in a warm fertile drained soil in a sunny to partly shaded sight.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) BSWJ12560

acerifolia v. subapoda

A perennial woodland species from cool moist mountain forests of the Sobaeksan area, South Korea. Which forms clumps of upright downy stems, with whirls of leaves to 20cm across that are roughly rounded in outline, but pleasingly palmately 7-11 shallowly lobed, which again are downy on emergence in spring. Extending upward by late summer with a discrete if not transparent display of characteristically shuttlecock white flowers with long scaly calyces on slender scapes 35-80cm tall above the leaves. Best grown in a humus rich soil with good drainage in light to full shade.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) BSWJ11397

apiculata

Only forming tiny plants where we collected the seed of this Japanese perennial species, on steep shaded slopes in the south eastern quarter of Shikoku in 2006. Growing in fairly dry conditions when we found them although it would have been moist in the growing season. Forming glossy rosettes of small angular thick-textured leaves, with slender upright stems bearing the characteristic narrow-petalled ray-flowers with scaly calyces. Cultivate with care in cool light shade in a well drained soil with moisture retention.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) BSWJ11497

apiculata v. acerifolia

A diminutive variety of this already small perennial species which we collected the seed of from one of the forests on the remote rain-drenched island of Yakushima southern Japan in the autumn of 2006. Forming glossy rosettes of tiny deeply lobed thick-textured semi-evergreen leaves to 3 cm long, with slender upright scapes to 20cm tall, bearing the characteristic narrow-petalled white propeller-like ray-flowers with scaly calyces. Cultivate with care in cool light shade in a well drained soil with moisture retention.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) BSWJ11495

apiculata v. acerifolia

From seed we collected from one of the forests on the remote rain-drenched island of Yakushima southern Japan in the autumn of 2006. Of a diminutive variety of this already small perennial species, forming glossy rosettes of tiny deeply lobed thick-textured semi-evergreen leaves to 3 cm long, with slender upright scapes to 20cm tall, bearing the characteristic narrow-petalled white propeller-like ray-flowers with scaly calyces. Cultivate with care in cool light shade in a well drained soil with moisture retention.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) BSWJ11720

chapaensis

A small woodland semi-evergreen perennial species growing from a small creeping rhizome. With a basal rosette, of small heart-shaped grey-green thick-textured leaves on long petioles, bearing slender upright stems with the characteristic narrow-petalled ray-flowers with scaly calyces. Growing in fairly dry conditions when we found them although it would have been moist in the growing season. Our seed collection from a remote area of northern Vietnam, gathered in 2006. Cultivate with care in light shade in a well drained soil with moisture retention.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) FMWJ13426

latifolia

A rosette forming perennial herb to 1m tall, composed of a basal rosette of leaves with broadly winged petioles 10cm long, nearly as long as leaf blade. The leaf blade ovate or narrowly ovate, 3-11 × 1-6.5 cm, papery, sparsely softly hairy, white tomentose below. With the inflorescences arising on a single slender upright stem, with many upwardly inclined slender branches carrying the white ray flowers with scaly cylindrical involucre. Best grown in a well drained site with some moisture retention, in a cool well lit spot.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) BSWJ11732

petelotii

A woodland semi-evergreen perennial species growing from a creeping rhizome. With a basal rosette, of small grey-green thick-textured leaves purple on their undersides, on long winged petioles. Bearing slender upright congested stems to 1m tall, with the characteristic narrow-petalled ray-flowers with scaly calyces. Growing in fairly dry conditions when we found them although it would have been moist in the growing season. Our seed collection from Phan Si Pan the highest mountain in northern Vietnam, gathered in 2006. Cultivate with care in light shade in a well drained soil with moisture retention.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) BSWJ11819

tonkinensis

An evergreen perennial species growing from a small creeping rhizome. Forming tight basal rosettes, of sessile lanceolate thick-textured glossy fresh green leaves. Bearing several slender upright branched stems to 80cm tall, with the characteristic narrow-petalled ray-flowers with scaly calyces. Growing from crevices on steep riverside cliffs when we found them where it would have been moist in the growing season. Our seed collection from Phan Si Pan the highest mountain in northern Vietnam, gathered in 2006. Cultivate with care in light shade in a well drained soil with moisture retention.

Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) BSWJ11336

uniflorus

A semi-evergreen woodland perennial, we collected seed of in a high mountain forest on Shikoku Island Japan in 2006. Growing in heavy shade, where it formed rosettes of deeply lobed palmate leaves to 15 cm across, with tall slender inflorescences topped by pendant purple protruding ray flowers encased in scaly bracts. Easily grown in a well drained soil with plenty of added humus for moisture retention, in light to dark shade. Syn. Diaspananthus

Akebia (Lardizabalaceae) BSWJ3606

longiracemosa

Woody-stemmed, twining climber with leaves having five semi-evergreen long leaflets. Vanilla-scented, brownish purple flowers appear on long racemes to 15cm long in spring followed by sausage shaped, purplish fruits. Requires full sun and a moist drained soil. Our own collection from Ilan, N. Taiwan..

Akebia (Lardizabalaceae) BSWJ4425

quinata

Woody-stemmed very hardy, twining climber with five ovate dainty semi-evergreen leafleted leaves, purple flushed in spring. Vanilla-scented, purple flowers appear in spring followed by sausage shaped, purplish fruits when pollinated. Full sun to part shade in moist drained soil. Our collection from Cheju-Dõ, S. Korea.

Akebia (Lardizabalaceae) BSWJ8415

quinata 'White Chocolate'

Woody-stemmed twining climber with five ovate leafleted semi-evergreen pale green leaves. Vanilla-scented, white to palest purple flowers appear in late spring followed by sausage shaped, dull white fruits. Requires full sun on the branches to flower well with a moist well drained soil.

Akebia (Lardizabalaceae)

quinata variegated

Woody-stemmed, twining climber with five yellow blotched ovate leafleted semi-evergreen leaves. Vanilla-scented, brownish purple flowers appear in late spring followed by sausage shaped, purplish fruits. Requires full sun and well drained soil. A form from cultivation in Japan. The variegation tends not to be as visible when the plant is too well fed.

Akebia (Lardizabalaceae)

quinata white flowered form

Woody-stemmed, twining climber with five ovate leafleted semi-evergreen pale green leaves. Vanilla-scented, creamy white flowers appear in late spring followed by sausage shaped, dull white fruits. Requires full sun on the branches to flower well with a moist well drained soil.

Akebia (Lardizabalaceae) BSWJ4102

trifoliata

From one of our collection from Ch'õllip'o, South Korea gathered in the autumn of 1997. A woody-stemmed, twining climber with leaves comprising of three leaflets, which are purple flushed in spring. Vanilla-chocolate scented, dark purple flowers appear in early spring (in March for us) followed by late summer with sausage shaped purplish fruits to 13cm long, if pollinated by another clone. Best grown in full sun to part shade in drained soil. For fruit you must have two clones (seedlings) i.e. not cuttings from the same plant as are normally offered in Western cultivation.

Akebia (Lardizabalaceae) BSWJ5063

trifoliata

Woody-stemmed, twining climber with leaves comprising of three leaflets, which are purple flushed in spring. Vanilla-chocolate scented, dark purple flowers appear in early spring (in March for us) followed by late summer with sausage shaped purplish fruits to 13cm long, if pollinated. Best grown in full sun to part shade in drained soil. Second generation seed raised from our original collection from the Fukuroi area of Honshu, Japan in 1997. For fruit you must have two clones (seedlings) i.e. not cuttings from the same plant as are normally offered in Western cultivation.

Akebia (Lardizabalaceae)

trifoliata 'Big Fruit'

Woody-stemmed, twining climber with leaves comprising of three leaflets, which are purple flushed in spring. Vanilla-chocolate scented, dark purple flowers appear in early spring (in March for us) followed by late summer with sausage shaped purplish fruits to 13cm long, if pollinated. Best grown in full sun to part shade in drained soil. Second generation seed raised grown from a cultivar we acquired in Japan grown for its large edible fruit. For fruit you must have two clones (seedlings) i.e. not cuttings from the same plant as are normally offered in Western cultivation.

Allium (Alliaceae) BSWJ8881

tuberosum

A wild collection of the Chinese Chives, which we found growing on Hirotani mountain in the north of Kyushu, Japan. Where it inhabited a very rocky exposed position in full sun. Forming clumps of grassy strong onion smelling leaves 15-20cm tall, with globular heads of white starry flowers June-September. Easily grown in any well drained fertile soil in sun.

Alniphyllum (Styracaceae) FMWJ13121

aff. eberhardtii

Forming medium sized trees 7-8m tall with relatively large elliptic leaves 20 × 10cm with terminal and axillary 10-30 flowered panicles of elongated seed-capsules which were the result of the showy white flows to 5cm across with contrasting pink styles, born March to April in the wild. From our seed collection gathered in a moist valley in the Hoàng Liên Son Mountain Range in northern Vietnam in 2011. Best grown in shelter from cold winds in a sunny sheltered position in a drained soil that retains some moisture.

Alniphyllum (Styracaceae) FMWJ13013

fortunei

From one of our collections gathered in 2011 on a moist hill side in the Hoàng Liên Son Mountain Range in northern Vietnam. Where we found small to medium sized deciduous trees with upright trunks and grey-brown sturdy branches bearing ovate-deltoid relatively thick textured leaves15cm long stellate-bristly below. With large terminal, but mostly axillary many-flowered (in seed) panicles to 20 cm long, which had born the white 3cm wide flowers from April to July in the wild. Best grown in shelter from cold winds in a sunny sheltered position in a drained soil that retains some moisture.

Alnus (Betulaceae)

maximowiczii aff.

Eventually forming a small tree, but most likely a well branched small to large shrub in gardens. Raised from seed gathered from an AM form, originating from a collection gathered by the late Kenneth Ashburner from the island of Ullüngdõ off the eastern coast of Korea. Described there as a large shrub with thick branches bearing orbicular to heat-shaped 10-12 paired ribbed leaves bearing, yellow-maroon catkins in June resulting in handsome rounded cones by the winter. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil that is not too dry in sun or part shade. ***** **** ***** **** **** **** **** These plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants during the dormant winter period, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only. Smaller containerised plants may be offered d

Alnus (Betulaceae) BSWJ10895

pendula

Only forming a small multi-stemmed tree to 3m+ where we collected the seed of this most unusual alder in Aomori in the cold north of Japan. With dark green parallely-ribbed or corrugated ovate-lanceolate leaves and clusters of cone-like short catkins. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil in sun or shade.

Alnus (Betulaceae) BSWJ10895

pendula

Only forming a small multi-stemmed tree to 3m+ where we collected the seed of this most unusual alder in Aomori in the cold north of Japan. With dark green parallely-ribbed or corrugated ovate-lanceolate leaves and clusters of cone-like short catkins. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil in sun or shade. ***** **** ***** **** **** **** **** These plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants during the dormant winter period, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only. Smaller containerised plants may be offered during the season.

Alnus (Betulaceae)

sieboldiana

While originating from Japan, this is one of the most appealing species of the genus. Valued for its ornamental broadly orbicular-ovate serrated leaves, conspicuously ribbed by 12-15 pairs of lateral nerves. Bearing pendant yellow catkins in early spring which mature into conspicuous ornamental ovoid cones by summer lasting long into the winter months. Forming a small tree in time but only a medium to large sized shrub in the garden. While being totally drought tolerant. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any type of fertile soil. A few larger sized plants also available. ***** **** ***** **** **** **** **** These plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants during the dormant winter period, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Alpinia (Zingiberaceae) BSWJ11512

aff. zerumbet

Forming a stout tufted perennial with stems to 2.5m tall (taller if frost free), bearing broad-lanceolate leaves densely hairy below, 50-70cm long by up to 15cm wide. Flowering July-August on the previous year's leafy stems, on terminal pendant spikes 20-30cm long, of white red-tipped in bud which open golden yellow overlaid by red venation. Best grown in full sun and in a moisture retentive fertile soil. To flower the stems must be kept frost free. Our collection from close to the coast on the Japanese island of Yakushima.

Alpinia (Zingiberaceae) BSWJ8889

japonica

A clump forming rhizomatous perennial with stems to 60cm tall, bearing broad almost sessile leaves softly hairy below, 40cm long by 7cm wide with undulating margins. Flowering May-June on the previous year's stems, in terminal 15cm dense spikes, white with red striation to 2.5cm long, followed by ovoid red fruit. Full sun and moist soil protect from frost. Our collection from a bamboo forest in Yukuhashi, Kyushu. These are very full pots!

Altingia (Hamamelidaceae) BSWJ11756

poilanei

Forming a small well branched shapely tree or large shrub in the wild, clothed in dark green broadly elliptic finely serrated leaves a distinct parchment texture. Where this Hamamelis relative still retains the large globose pitted seed capsules when we collected the seed in a remote area of northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2006. Best grown in shelter from freezing winds in a moisture retentive drained soil in either sun or part shade, protect from frost.

Amorphophallus (Araceae) BSWJ4845

kiusianus

From a collection we made on the island of Shikoku, Japan in 1997, where this species is often seen growing in vegetable plots. An ornamental species growing from an irregularly shaped tuber, with upright reptilian stems to 1m tall, bearing a large much divided leaf 1m across. Flowering best under protection, which protrudes directly from the tuber. Hardy outside in UK gardens in a drained soil in shelter.

Ampelocissus (Vitaceae) HWJK2066

sikkimensis

An extraordinary curiosity amongst the grape vine family, which we had great difficulty in identifying. Appearing like a lush large leafed Vitis except it is herbaceous, with long flexuous annual climbing tendrilled stems bearing palmate rugose leaves to 60-70 cm long of a tan colour, obscuring the comparatively small glossy black 'grapes', which are very popular with the native children in the remote corner of eastern Nepal we collected this from. Best grown in a sheltered sunny position in drained fertile soil, protect the roots in winter.

Ampelopsis (Vitaceae) BSWJ12982

aconitifolia

From seed liberated from The Lucca Botanic Gardens, who invite us to participate in their flower show every September. Where this small tendril climber from the grape family grows happily on a west facing wall. Here it is kept to just 2m tall, clothed in its distinct deeply lobed and incised palmate foliage, dark green all summer transforming to a contrasting autumnal yellow by October. A perfect foil to the turquoise fruit that mature through the summer months. Easily grown in good light heat will be required to produce the fruit. Best in a well drained gritty soil with a modicum of moisture retention.

Ampelopsis (Vitaceae) BSWJ4336

brevipedunculata 'Citrulloides'

Once seen in fruit, these vines are never forgotten. One of our collections from South Korea. Forming a large woody vine, with attractive flaking bark, bearing deeply incised palmate leaves and porcelain blue fruit in autumn, as the colour of the leaves turn yellow. Full sun any fertile drained soil.

Ampelopsis (Vitaceae) BSWJ1793

glandulosa v. hancei

One of our collections, from the mountain forests in the north of Taiwan. There it makes a strong growing deciduous vine, with autumnal tints. Best in full sun with some shelter, to ripen its blue fruit, any good soil.

Ampelopsis (Vitaceae)

megalophylla

This woody vine has the distinction of bearing the longest leaves (45-60cm) of any hardy climber, made up of many bipinnately arranged toothed leaflets. The masses of summer flowers produce small black fruits by autumn. Although strong growing to 9m it is not a fast grower.

Ampelopsis (Vitaceae) BSWJ1946

sp. from Taiwan

One of our collections, from the mountain forests in the north of Taiwan. There it makes a strong growing deciduous, vine, with autumnal tints. Best in full sun with some shelter, to ripen its fruit, any good soil.

Ancylostemon (Gesneriaceae) BSWJ6624

convexus

Our collection of this diminutive perennial, that we found growing terrestrially and on vertical mossy tree-trunks as an epiphyte. From a lofty altitude of 2280m almost at the summit of Doi Phohom-Pok, Northern Thailand. Evergreen perennial with softly hairy leaves forming tight rosettes, bearing long tubular bright yellow flowers on very long slender stems, July-Aug. Untried for hardiness, good in containers or a shady sheltered site.

Ancylostemon (Gesneriaceae) BSWJ7182

convexus

Our collection of this diminutive perennial, that we found growing terrestrially and on vertical mossy tree-trunks as an epiphyte. From a lofty altitude of 2100m almost at the summit of Doi Phohom-Pok, Northern Thailand in 1999. Evergreen perennial with softly hairy leaves forming tight rosettes, bearing long tubular bright yellow flowers on very long slender stems, July-Aug. Untried for hardiness, good in containers or a shady sheltered site.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae)

× lipsiensis

A pale sulphur-yellow flowered hybrid of A. nemorosa × ranunculoïdes. Growing from creeping rhizomes, a charming form of this slow growing perennial woodlander with deeply divided ternate leaves on short stalks, which is capable of forming good-sized colonies in time. Height 15cm. Spread 30cm. Easily grown in any kind of fertile soil that does not dry out, in part to full shade.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae)

apennina double blue

Spreading perennial form slowly running underground rhizomes with short stems to 15cm tall bearing deeply cut delicate foliage and fully double powder blue flowers for a long time in spring. A wonderful low growing addition to the woodland spring flowering garden. Easily grown in full to part shade of woodland or shrubs in a soil that does not dry out. It is not unusual for the flowers to be single after disturbance, i.e. after potting or planting.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) HWJ631

chapaensis

An unusual species that we collected along side one of the forests in the high mountains of Northern Vietnam. Where it slowly forms a clump of stiffly upright stems with dark green leathery lobed leaves bearing branching stems of white open outwardly facing flowers 2.5cm across. Height 40cm. Spread 15cm. partial shade in a free draining soil.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) BWJ8190

hupehensis

From seed of a particularly choice form of this species I collected on my last day with Dan Hinkley well to the north of Baoxing Sichuan, China, growing on very steep ground at the edge of the forest. Where it had formed a sizeable colony from its stoloniferous roots with stiff upright branching stems to only 30-40cm tall, bearing trifoliate slightly hairy leaves and umbels of large upwardly facing white flowers. Easily grown in any free draining soil in full sun or light shade. Flowering August to October. ******************************As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ4886

hupehensis v. japonica

This is the original wild form of the Japanese anemone. Bearing deep pink semi-double flowers, consisting of 20-30 narrow quilled or flattened and twisted petals/tepals, from mid-summer into autumn. Height 90cm. Any good drained soil in sun or shade. Our collection from Shikoku, Japan.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae)

keiskeana

Arising from a slender shortly creeping rhizome to 10cm long, spindly long petioles hold 3-foliate palmate reptilian-like patterned leaves to 5cm long. With solitary bright white and contrasting flowers which are held just above the foliage. Easily grown in full to part shade a well drained humus-rich soil. Summer dormant.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7919

leveillei

From seed I collected in Yunnan, an easily cultivated perennial with stiff, branching stems bearing delicate, slightly cup-shaped, white blue-backed flowers in summer above palmately divided, dark green leaves. Height 60cm. Spread 30cm. partial shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae)

leveillei

Perennial with stiff, branching stems bearing good sized, cup shaped, bright white flowers in June-July above deeply divided, dark green leaves. Height 60cm. Spread 30cm. Partial shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6716

matsudai

A wonderful Taiwanese Anemone which has just been correctly named. A robust form of the species in this collection made in the forests of Taroko Eastern Taiwan. Where this rhizomatous hairy perennial, with large rugose trifoliate basal leaves on long stems. Bore round cotton wool-like seed heads which had succeeded the terminal cymes of white flowers, with a large boss of yellow stamen, on erect stems 1m tall in this form. (Syn. Eriocapitella)

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ7083

matsudai 'Taiwans Tiny Treasure'

An alpine form of this rhizomatous hairy perennial, with trifoliate basal leaves which in this form only attains 25cm height where as the normal form that we see growing at a lower altitude is up to 1.2m tall. Bearing terminal cymes of cup-shaped white flowers with an enlarged boss of yellow stamen, from June to October. One of our seed collections from steep alpine scree close to Yushan the highest mountain in Taiwan

Anemone (Ranunculaceae)

ranunculoïdes

Spreading perennial for damp woodland, bearing buttercup-like, single deep yellow flowers in spring. Growing from creeping rhizomes, with deeply divided palmate leaves, which is capable of forming good-sized colonies in time. Height 15cm. Spread 30cm. Easily grown in any kind of fertile soil that does not dry out, in part to full shade.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae)

rivularis

Perennial with stiff, branching stems bearing delicate, cup shaped, white blue-centred flowers in summer above deeply divided, dark green leaves. Height 60cm. Spread 30cm. partial shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7611

rivularis

From seed I collected in Sichuan, an easily cultivated perennial with stiff, branching stems bearing delicate, slightly cup-shaped, white blue-centred flowers in summer above palmately divided, dark green leaves. Height 60cm. Spread 30cm. partial shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ13944

rivularis

We need not have been worried of finding this well known species during our high altitude trek on the Singalila Ridge in 2013, where we eventually found a sizeable colony in seed at 3030m. An easily cultivated perennial with stiff upright, branching stems bearing delicate, slightly cup-shaped, white blue-backed flowers May to September, above deeply divided, dark green palmate leaves. Easily grown in most types of fertile soils with adequate drainage combined with some moisture retention, in either full sun or partial shade.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11265

sumatrana

A most unusual species we gathered the seed of in one of the most unexpected locations, high up on the slopes of Gunung Kerinci Sumatra’s highest volcano. A fairly small species with palmately 3-5 deeply lobes well mottled leaves, from short rhizomes with upright stems to 40 cm topped by a dense whirl/rosette of flowering stalks bearing 3-4 bright white yellow centred widely opening flowers ageing green in their centres. Meanwhile the aerial rosette transmigrates to the ground and roots, forming a new plant and in time a colony. Best grown in shelter from severe cold in part shade in a humus rich soil.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) WJC13743

vitifolia

A rare species in gardens, arising from a tufted rootstock from underground shortly creeping stolons. With branched stems to 1.5m tall, but normally only half that in gardens. Bearing 5-9 lobed thick textured leaves silky-woolly beneath and shallowly cupped white flowers to 5cm across held in loose umbels July-September. One of our seed collections made in the eastern Himalayas. Not the easiest to please, best in a well drained soil that has a bit of moisture retention, in sun or part shade. One of the parent species to the × hybridum group, so popular in gardens.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) HWJ682

vitifolia

From the mountainous area around Sapa in Northern Vietnam and disjunct from the rest of the species. Where it forms a tufted rootstock, spreading by underground stolons, with leaves 5-9 lobed and silky-woolly beneath, flowers are white in umbels on stems to 150cm. Well drained soil essential.

Anemone (Ranunculaceae) WJC13758

vitifolia

Our seed collection made in the eastern Himalayas at 2890m, from an unusual form of this species, arising from a tufted rootstock from underground shortly creeping stolons. With branched stems to 1.5m tall, but normally only half that in gardens. Bearing 5-9 lobed thick textured leaves, silky-woolly beneath and shallowly cupped white flowers to 5cm across held in loose umbels July-September. Not the easiest to please, best in a well drained soil that has a bit of moisture retention, in sun or part shade. One of the parent species to the × hybridum group, so popular in gardens.

Anemonopsis (Ranunculaceae)

macrophylla

A choice perennial from Japan with, nodding slate-blue waxy flowers of opalescent quality, borne on slender stems July-Sept., above divided ferny foliage. Height 80cm. Careful sighting out of drying winds, in peaty an acid moist but well drained soil, SHADE.

Anemonopsis (Ranunculaceae)

macrophylla 'White Swan'

An herbaceous perennial that we bought from a nursery in Japan, which retains all of the wonderful characteristics of this emphatic woodlander with a paler hue to the low clump of delicately divided foliage. Thrusting elegant swan's neck-like slender arching stems bearing the wonderfully waxy pure white flowers in this form, which of course glow in the dense shade that they thrive in. Height 80cm. Careful sighting out of drying winds, in peaty an acid moist but well drained soil, SHADE.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ11197

aff. acutiloba v. iwatensis

Growing from a short rhizome a small species we collected seed of on the slopes of Mt. Fuji, where the broad umbels held the dried winged seed, which had been preceded by white-yellow flowers. With leaves to 70cm across 2-3 times divided. Easily grown in sun or light shade, in any type of drained soil. Believed to have medicinal uses.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ11543

aff. gigas

Only forming a relatively small plant to around a meter tall for us to date, an unusual perennial species in so much as it is long-lived. Forming offsets when happy, which flower after a year or two then depart, leaving its own offsets for the following years. New into cultivation and little known or appreciated, with dramatic purple tinged branched stems topped by deep purple domed flowering umbels by mid-late summer above the 3-5 clefted or parted leaves. One of our collections gathered in the high mountains of Shikoku Island, Japan in 2006. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or light shade.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ10968

anomala

A wonderfully ornamental introduction that is a slender long lived perennial species (yes you read correctly) we collected seed of in the mountain forests of Nagano in the cool north-west of Japan in 2005. Capable of reaching 3m tall (only 1.7m in our fields) with very dark many branched stems bearing large complex flat umbels of white flowers, followed by flat winged seed. With large twice-divided lustrous leaves. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or part shade.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ14083

breweri

An elegant member of the Umbelliferae family which we collected seed of from the Green Pass just into southern Oregon in the autumn of 2014. Which can grow as tall as 1.7m in favorable conditions, with stout stems bearing narrowly divided leaves to 60cm long. Bearing June to August broad fuzzy white umbels of white insect attracting flowers, followed by flat seed (for the birds). Best grown in sun to light shade in our cooler climate, in a reasonably drained soil with some moisture retention.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ12663

cartilaginomarginata

Originating from one of our seed collections gathered from the Waraksan area in the cold mountains of central South Korea. Where it grew in small clearings within the dense forest, forming only small slender plants to 80cm tall with green stems in this form. Forming basal rosettes of pinnately lobed leaves to 25cm long, distinct in the rachis (stalk carrying the 5-9 leaflets) which is winged. Flowering in a flat topped umbel of many small white flowers in July-August followed by rounded flat seed. Easily cultivated in either part shade or full sun, in a fertile soil that affords some good drainage.

Angelica (Apiaceae) WJC13658

cyclocarpa

What a great plant to kick off our collecting in the eastern Himalayas in the autumn of 2013. We could hardly believe our eyes when we first saw the sturdy upright stems to at least 2m (recorded up to 3.5m) tall. Topped by one of the widest umbells I can remember seeing, composed of several 30cm wide umbells, which would have flowered a yellow-green July to September, resulting in the flat rounded seed we were collecting. The basal leaves, which were dormant at that time, are recorded as being 1m wide ovate in outline, 3-pinnately divided lobed and serrated, with conspicuously large petiole wings, more so on the upper leaves. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. Yet to be seen how perennial this species remains in cultivation.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ8603

dahurica

The largest species we have so far encountered in the wild, where it attained a height of 2.5m at the edge of a dense forest in the mountains of the Sobaeksan area in Korea. With deeply-cleft twice-thrice pinnately divided large basal leaves and stout stems which are hairy and branched in the upper parts, bearing large terminal flat heads of orbicular umbels of white flowers July-August, followed by flat winged seed. Easily grown full sun to part shade in soil a rich soil for size.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ5746

decursiva

An unusual species in so much as it is long-lived forming offsets when happy, which flower after a year or two then depart, leaving its own offsets for the following years. Rare in cultivation, a dramatic stout purple tinged perennial Umbelliferae we collected on Shikoku Island, Japan. Attaining a height of 80-150cm, having 3-5 clefted or parted leaves, below the purple compound umbels of flowers which are borne in the summer.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ10886

edulis

Described as attaining gigantic proportions, a species we recently collected seed of in mountain forests of Aomori in the cold north of Japan in 2005. Capable of reaching 2m tall with reddish branched stems bearing large complex umbels of white flowers, followed by flat seed. With large 2-3 times divided glossy thick-textured leaves. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or part shade.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ4170

gigas

A dramatic stout perennial Umbelliferae we collected in South Korea. Attaining a height of 2m(6'), having rounded leaflets in 60cm wide leaves, below the large compound 20cm rounded umbels of purplish flowers. Best in sun well drained soil.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ11480

japonica

An imposing perennial species we introduced to cultivation, described as ''Gigantic perennial herb; stems stout, thick.....often dark purple''. Which we collected seed of off a sea shore on the mythical island of Yakushima southern Japan. Where the robust 2m grooved stems had dried and blown away in the exposure meanwhile those in the setback shrubbery still retained the broad heads of terminal umbels of flat winged seed which had succeeded the white flowers. Bearing large thick textured semi-evergreen once-twice pinnately divided leaves on striped stems in this form.

Angelica (Apiaceae) RWJ9802

morii

A new species to cultivation, from seed we collected from a very steep well drained rocky mountain side at Hohuanshan eastern Taiwan in 2003 with Dick Hayward. Where it formed short plants to only 50cm tall with celery-like 2-3 times divided foliage with wide terminal umbels consisting of orbicular umbels of small white flowers resulting in flat winged seed. Easily grown in sun or part shade in a well drained fertile soil.

Angelica (Apiaceae) WJC13763

nubigena

Having already encountered A. cyclocarpa in the lower valley we felt extremely lucky to find this smaller species seeding at a mere 1.2m tall (recorded to 2m) at almost 4,000m in north-eastern Himalayas. The sturdy purple stems were topped by many very wide umbels composed of 50-rayed flat topped umbells of 30 pale yellow flowers, resulting in the disc-shaped seed we were collecting. The basal leaves which were dormant at that time, arise from long thick rhizomes, they are recorded as being 40cm wide ovate in outline, 3-pinnately divided deeply lobed and serrated, with inconspicuously winged petioles. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. Yet to be seen how perennial this species remains in cultivation.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ5593

pubescens

Our collection from Honshu Island, Japan, of this dramatic purple tinged, stout slightly hairy perennial Umbelliferae, which is rare in cultivation. Attaining a height of 2m, having clefted or parted leaves, below the compound umbels of white flowers. Sun or part shade in any fertile drained soil.

Angelica (Apiaceae) BSWJ6387

pubescens v. matsumurae

Our collection from the Mt. Daisen area of Honshu Island, Japan, of this dramatic stout only slightly hairy perennial Umbelliferae, which is rare in cultivation. Attaining a height of 3m, having clefted or parted leaves, below the wide compound umbels of white flowers, July-Aug.

Angelica (Apiaceae)

ursina

Its not every day that you receive a welcomed gift from Siberia, alright it was via Ireland, but what a classic! Arriving here as a young seedling, which was immediately planted out in a fairly rough area of our garden. It slowly formed a wide basal clump of short purple stems with leaves composed of large ovate-oblong narrowly pointed leaflets thrice ternately pinnate (divided three times). Finally after a few years it thrust up an enormous sturdy bright red-purple slightly zigzagged stem, terminating in a large inflated bud of bracts, opening to an even larger wide terminal 60-100 rayed inflorescence each terminating in a round umbel of 30-40 white flowers. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. A perennial long-lived species, more so in not too rich condi

Anisodus (Solanaceae) BWJ7501

carniolicoides

From the heady altitude of the mountains surrounding Zhongdian North Yunnan China at 3400m, my collection from 2000. Where this lax perennial with numerous stout branches to 1m tall bore soft green broadly elliptic leaves and large axillary rounded capsules of black seed. Which had succeeded the greenish-yellow purple lipped tubular flowers carried May-June. Easily grown in any drained fertile soil in sun or shade.

Apios (Papilionaceae)

americana

A slender twining tuberous climber, from North America, to 1.5m. Once rivalling the potato as a root vegetable. Having soft pinnate foliage and bearing in late summer dense spikes of maroon/fawn curiously shaped pea-flowers. Any fertile soil growing into sun. *

Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ4775

buergeriana v. oxysepala

An unusual woodland species which we collected the seed of from the very north of Honshu, Japan. A clump-forming perennial with slender upright stems to 60cm tall, bearing bi-ternate rhombic leaves on dainty stalks and lantern-like bi-coloured copper and yellow flowers, with distinctly in-curved spurs on this variety. Flowering June-August, for a drained position in full sun or shade in any fertile soil. ******************************As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ14053

eximia

From seed we gathered from a small plant that we found growing in a damp rocky crag, with glandular pubescent foliage, green above glaucous below. Capable of attaining 1m height under favourable conditions, bearing bright red flowers with short spurs, which are yellow at the mouth, with protruding conspicuous boss of stamen. The small stature being the result of the challenging conditions we encountered in a remarkable hidden serpentine canyon called The Cedars, in Sonoma County California, where we were taken by one of the owners, Roger Raiche in the autumn of 2014.

Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ13543

formosa

From one of our hikes with Dan Hinkley on Mount Townsend in the Pacific North-West in 2013. Where we found plants of this beautiful species in seed growing in an alpine meadow. With pendant long spurred red flowers consisting of five red, lance-shaped sepals pointing outwards or slightly recurved, with five slender conical petals red that are yellow at the open ends. Flowering from April to August. Easily grown in a drained fertile soil that does not dry out in good light to light shade.

Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ14072

formosa v. truncata

A perennial red and yellow flowering species we found growing in a serpentine area on Cooks Pass, in northern California with Sean Hogan in the autumn of 2014. With pendant short spurred red flowers consisting of five red, lance-shaped sepals pointing outwards or slightly recurved, with five conical petals red that are yellow at the open ends. Flowering from April to August. Easily grown in a drained fertile soil that does not dry out in full sun to light shade.

Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7965

rockii

From my collections made in Zhongdian, China of a perennial with upright spurs on purplish flowers, born on slender reddish stems in spring-early summer. From a basal rosettes of rounded, divided leaves. Height 60cm. Spread 30cm. Best in part shade in a well drained soil.

Araiostegia (Davalliaceae) BSWJ1608

parvipinnata

An easily cultivated species that has thrived in our garden for years, originating from a small piece of branching rhizome covered in gingery hair (scales). That we originally collected growing epiphytically on an old log in a very deep and dark moist gully within the alpine forest on the cold slopes of Hohuanshan Taiwan in 1993. Where it formed a loose patch of rhizomes with upright slender scaly stems (stipes) to 30cm long bearing a loosely triangular in outline 35 × 30cm fronds of the most delicate finely dissected thin texture possible. Best grown in moist leafmould in full to light shade where the rhizomes can creep along the surface.

Araiostegia (Davalliaceae) HWJ1007

pulchra

Forming an impressive species where we gathered this fern on the slopes of Fansipan the highest mountain in the north of Vietnam in 2003. Unfurling from creeping epiphytic rhizomes densely covered with ginger scales, with upright slender scaly stems (stipes) to 50cm long bearing fronds that were loosely triangular in outline to 50cm long and nearly as wide. Which are one of the most delicate looking finely divided species we grow, with the lamina 5 times pinnately divided. Best grown in moist leafmould in full to light shade where the rhizomes can creep along the surface.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ6916

aff. armata

From one of our seed collections gathered in the autumn of 1999 from Mayfeng in the wet north-east, high in the Central Mountains of Taiwan. A small tree or tall shrub normally only forming a single trunk with densely prickly stems to 3m tall. Bearing large bipinnate or tripinnate leaves made up of numerous ovate leaflets, with prickles along the mid-ribs. Inflorescence a large terminal panicle of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit.. Easily grown in any type of drained soil best in full sun.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BWJ8102

aff. chinensis

An imposing spiny large shrub or small tree, with huge bipinnately composed leaves to well over a meter long, held in a congested whirls atop of upright stout shortly spiny woody stems, which were dark on this collection I made on Emeishan in China. Where it competed with dense undergrowth on the steep slopes bearing a large branched paniculate inflorescence, of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ11736

aff. searelliana

Only forming a small tree with a slender spiny trunk where we happened across this species, growing in the forest close to the border with China in the extreme north of Vietnam in the autumn of 2006. Bearing large leaves to 1.75m long and almost across composed of large leaflets to 20 cm across, bi-pinnately arranged on reddish stalks all held on long reddish spiny petioles. With an extremely large terminal fruitescence of deep purple fruit. Best grown in a sheltered warm situation out of strong winds.

Aralia (Araliaceae) EDHCH9720

apioides

An herbaceous species with highly textured small leafleted doubly pinnate leaves to 1m long, with brilliant autumnal hues. Which bears elongated panicles of white flowers held in orbicular clusters in early summer, followed by plump black fruit in late summer to autumn. Easily grown in part shade in a drained soil that does not dry out. This collection represents Erick Hammond's (of Heronswood) collections from Sichuan.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ3137

armata

Small tree or tall shrub normally only forming a single trunk with densely prickly stems to 3m tall. Bearing large bipinnate or tripinnate leaves made up of numerous ovate leaflets, with prickles along the mid-ribs. Inflorescence a large terminal panicle of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit. From one of our seed collections gathered in the autumn of 1996 from Tayuling, high in the Central Mountains of eastern Taiwan. Easily grown in any type of drained soil best in full sun.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ6719

armata

Shrub with densely prickly stems to 3m. Leaves large bipinnate or tripinnate made up of numerous ovate leaflets, with prickles along the mid-ribs. Inflorescence a large panicle of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit. Our collection from Taroko, Eastern Taiwan.

Aralia (Araliaceae) RWJ10101

bipinnata

Our seed collection from Long-Jen a restricted steep sided valley close to the eastern coast of Taiwan, from our 2003 expedition. From a small 4m tall tree with sparsely prickly stems. Leaves unarmed large bipinnate dark green above glaucous below, comprising numerous glabrous ovate leaflets, with a pair of leaflets at each division of the rachis. Inflorescence a large upright panicle with numerous side branches of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit.

Aralia (Araliaceae) CWJ12407

bipinnata

From a large shrub 7-8m tall with sparsely prickly stems. With large unarmed bi-pinnate leaves dark green above glaucous below 1m long, comprising numerous glabrous ovate leaflets, with a pair of leaflets at each division of the rachis. Inflorescence a large upright panicle 90cm long with numerous long side branches of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit. A seed collection from The South Cross Highway from the forest edge near Kuanshan on the eastern side of Taiwan, at 1850m during my 2003 expedition with Finlay Colley. Easily grown in any fertile soil in sun or light shade, shelter from the coldest winds.

Aralia (Araliaceae)

cachemirica

A statuesque clump-forming perennial, which is capable of strong growth in rich conditions where it can form upright stems to 3m tall. Bearing large bright green tri-pinnate leaves, topped in summer by 1m long elegant terminal sprays of white flowers. These soon ripen to globose purple-black fruit by late summer whereupon the foliage take on bronze to purple tints. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil which is not waterlogged in winter in full sun to part shade.

Aralia (Araliaceae)

californica

Stout growing clump-forming architectural perennial. With strong stems to 2m, bearing large bright green pinnate leaves, topped in summer by 1m long elegant terminal sprays of white flowers soon followed by globose purple-black fruit. From seed originally collected in the Siskiyous, for moderately moist soil in full sun to part shade.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ11812

chapaense

Our seed collection made on our ascent to Fansipan the highest mountain in northern Vietnam in 2006. Where they formed a colony of single stemmed shrubs or small trees, with sparingly prickly fulvous-tomentose stems 2-4m. Bearing large leaves to 1m long double-pinnately compound made up of numerous small grey-green leaflets. With terminal branched inflorescences, of large panicles of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit. Easily grown sun to part shade in any type of fertile drained soil.

Aralia (Araliaceae) HWJ1013

chapaense

From our seed collection made with Dan Hinkley on our decent from Fansipan the highest mountain in northern Vietnam. A multi-stemmed shrub or small tree, with sparingly prickly fulvous-tomentose stems to 4m. Leaves large, to 1m doubly-pinnately compound made up of numerous small leaflets. Inflorescence, a large branched panicle of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit.***** ********* ***** **** Large open ground/bare rooted plants also available, best in winter when dormant. From £30.00. Please state size/height required. Above 1.5m for collection only.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ8437

continentalis

A most impressive and distinct large perennial species, which appears to be mis-identified in cultivation (usually described as having green-white flowers). With stout slightly hairy stems forming imposing architectural clumps to 2m tall, when established. Clothed in large alternate bipinnate leaves, topped in July-August by large terminal racemes to 50 cm long, of PINK flowers, succeeded by globose purple-black fruit. Originating from one of our seed collections from South Korea close to the eastern border with North Korea in 2001. Easily grown in sun or shade, forming a larger plant in a richer moisture retentive soils. Hardy to -30C.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ11588

cordata

Stout growing slightly hairy, clump-forming architectural perennial. With strong stems to 1.5m, bearing large alternate bipinnate leaves, topped in August by terminal racemes of green flowers soon followed by globose blue-black fruit. Our collection from the mountains of Honshu Japan, where they are also cultivated for their edible young shoots.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ5596

cordata

Stout growing slightly hairy, clump-forming architectural perennial. With strong stems to 2-3m or more in a rich soil, bearing large alternate bipinnate leaves, topped in August by terminal racemes of green flowers soon followed by globose purple-black fruit. Our collection from the mountains of the Kii Peninsular Honshu Japan, where they are also cultivated for their edible young shoots.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ8524

cordata from Ullüngdõ

One of the most impressive large perennial species, with stout slightly hairy stems forming imposing architectural clumps to 4m tall, when established. Clothed in large alternate bipinnate leaves, topped in July-August by large terminal racemes to 1.5m long, of cream-green flowers soon followed by globose purple-black fruit. Originating from one of our collection from South Korea gathered from the remote island of Ullüngdõ 80km off the north-eastern coast in 2001. Easily grown in sun or shade, forming a larger plant in a richer moisture retentive soils. Hardy to –30C.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ4773

cordata v. sachalinensis

Stout growing slightly hairy, clump-forming architectural perennial. With strong stems to 3-4m tall, bearing large alternate bipinnate leaves, topped in August by large terminal racemes to 1m or more of green pubescent flowers soon followed by globose blue-black fruit. Our collection from the mountains of northern Honshu Japan, where they are also cultivated for their edible young shoots.

Aralia (Araliaceae) RWJ9910

decaisneana

From one of our collections made in the Central Mountains of north Taiwan. Forming a shrub or multi-stemmed small tree with sparingly prickly fulvous-tomentose stems to 4m tall in the wild. Bearing very large bipinnately composed leaves made up of numerous ovate golden haired leaflets. Inflorescence villous, a large terminal branched panicle of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit. Easily grown in any fertile soil in sun or light shade, shelter from the coldest winds.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ6794

decaisneana

Shrub with sparingly prickly fulvous-tomentose stems to 3m. Leaves large pinnate made up of numerous ovate leaflets. Inflorescence villous, a large branched panicle of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit. Our collection from Taiwan.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ6828

decaisneana

Shrub or multi-stemmed small tree with sparingly prickly fulvous-tomentose stems to 4m tall in the wild. Bearing very large bipinnately composed leaves made up of numerous ovate softly hairy leaflets. Inflorescence villous, a large terminal branched panicle of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit. Our collection from Taipingshan North Taiwan. Easily grown in any fertile soil in sun or light shade, shelter from the coldest winds.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ5480

elata

Deciduous large shrub with sparsely prickly stems to 3.5m tall. Alternate leaves are large bipinnate made up of numerous ovate prickly leaflets. Inflorescence is a pubescent terminal compound raceme of creamy white flowers, followed by black globose fruit. Our collection from Japan. *** *** *** *** *** *** *** Large open ground/bare rooted plants also available, best in winter when dormant. Please state size height required, above 1.5m for collection only.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ8360

foliosa

From seed we collected in a remote area of Western Lao of this multi-stemmed shrub or small tree, with sparingly prickly stems to 3m. Leaves large, to 1m doubly-pinnately compound made up of numerous small leaflets. Inflorescence, a large branched panicle of creamy white flowers followed by dark purple globose fruit.

Aralia (Araliaceae) CD&R2289

kansuensis

A collection of a relatively small herbaceous species made by the trio Compton, d'Arcy & Rix from Napa Hai in north Yunnan, China in 1995. With textured small leafleted doubly pinnate leaves to 1m long, with brilliant autumnal hues. Which bears elongated panicles of white flowers held in orbicular clusters in early summer, followed by plump black fruit in late summer to autumn. Easily grown in part shade in a drained soil that does not dry out.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BWJ7650

kansuensis

From a seed collection I gathered on a high mountain pass to Little Snow Mountain in Yunnan in 2000. Of a relatively small herbaceous species with small leafleted doubly pinnate textured leaves to 1m long, with brilliant autumnal hues. Which bears elongated panicles of white flowers held in orbicular clusters in early summer, followed by plump black fruit by late summer to autumn. Easily grown in sun to part shade in a drained soil that does not dry out.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BSWJ9570

racemosa

A North American stout growing clump-forming architectural perennial. With strong stems to 2m tall, bearing large bright green 3-4 times pinnate leaves, topped in summer by 1m long elegant terminal panicles of white flowers soon followed by globose purple-black fruit. From seed originally collected in the Siskiyous, for moderately moist soil in full sun to part shade.

Aralia (Araliaceae) BWJ8131

searelliana

A small tree or multi stemmed shrub with short prickled stems with large bi-pinnately arranged softly hairy leaves composed of large leaflets to 22 cm long on mature plants, held on petioles to 1m long. Bearing large terminal inflorescences of small black fruit in the autumn-winter. From seed collected I collected to the south of Baoxing, China in 2000.

Aralia (Araliaceae) KWJ12349e

vietnamensis

After years of trying to collect this most impressive species we managed to persuade our guide Uoc to collect and send on some of this very late ripening seed to us. This most spectacular species of the genus has been recorded to 12 m tall, we would not expect half of that in our climate. The leaves are the largest I know of, to 2 m long while almost as wide, composed of leaflets that can also be to 25 cm. What has always impressed me is the texture of the leathery foliage covered in bristly golden hair. Best grown with caution as the hardiness is untested, so best kept out of very cold weather. Due to heavy winter losses of our seedlings (heater failed on the coldest night) the introduction of this collection will be delayed. Unfortunately the eventual price will reflect this. For collect

Aralia (Araliaceae)

woody non spiny climbing = see Pentapanax

Non spiny woody climbing Araliaceae are still listed under Pentapanax castanopsisicola CWJ12411, P. leschenaultii BSWJ9515, P. longepedunculatus BSWJ11789, P. subcordatus HWJK2385 & P. verticillatus BSWJ11797.

Ardisia (Myrsinaceae) BSWJ1032

japonica

A dwarf evergreen creeping shrub that is one of the most shade tolerant, yet never seen in British horticulture apart from its tender houseplant relatives. A seed collection from as long ago as 1993 which we have kept in a large container for most of that time, which we gathered from the forest of Kõjedõ an island off the south coast of South Korea. Where this small tightly suckering shrub covers the forest floors bearing small white flowers in clusters followed by bright red fruit on slender stems to 30 cm tall. Best grown in a humus rich drained soil in warm shade.

Ardisia (Myrsinaceae) BSWJ1841

japonica v. minor

Small evergreen creeping shrublet, with whirls of lustrous oblong leaves smaller than the normal species in this variety, on sparingly branched stems 10-20cm tall. Producing small nodding white flowers in axially umbels, followed by globose bright red fruit July on. Well drained retentive soil in full to part shade, only moderately lime tolerant. Our collection from the forests of Taiwan.

Ardisia (Myrsinaceae) BSWJ3809

japonica v. minor

Small evergreen creeping/carpeting shrublet, with whirls of lustrous oblong leaves smaller than the normal species in this variety, on sparingly branched stems 10-20cm tall. Producing small nodding white flowers in axially umbels, followed by globose bright red fruit July on. Well drained retentive soil in full to part shade, only moderately lime tolerant. Our collection from northern Taiwan.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ8639

angustatum v. peninsulae

Originating from one of our 2001 seed collections, gathered from a colony growing on a steep wooded hillside at 485m on the cold mountain of Woraksan, part of the central mountains of South Korea. With upright purple mottled stems to 90cm tall, bearing up to two pedate leaves, divided into 7-13, leaflets. The spathe is dark purple striped white, arching over the cylindrical spadix. As with all arisaemas, make sure there is acute drainage below the tuber, as this rots and is replaced by a new tuber annually. Surround the tuber with a leafy airy moisture retentive soil, best in part shade.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ071

consanguineum

Our collection from Taiwan. Found growing over a wide area, in nature from E. Himalayas to Taiwan. A single radiating leaf consisting of up to 20 narrow leaflets, tapering to long narrow filiform tips. Spathe (flower) variable, from plain green-dark purple striped, to 1.5mts.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ7000

grapsospadix

A new rhizomatous species which we have grown for a number of years under protection. Raised from division after being given permission to collect a few plants from Central Taiwan in 1999. Where we found it growing in moist dark forest at 1770m, the green slender rhizomes barley hidden with short upright stems bearing the trifoliate leaves. Just above the slender white green edged spathe with a slender dark green spadix just protruding. Best grown under protection in shade.

Arisaema (Araceae) WJC13660

griffithii v. pradhanii

One of the most dramatic of the Himalayan species of these tuberous perennials. With a very broad spathe on a short stem, the spathe embossed with dark purple gill-like markings, adding to the drama. While the spadix is very long narrowing to thread-like and extending out 20-60cm. Meanwhile the foliage is large and trifoliate. As with all arisaemas, make sure there is acute drainage below the tuber, as this rots and is replaced by a new tuber annually. Surround the tuber with a leafy airy moisture retentive soil, best in part shade.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ6776

kelung-insulare

Our own introduction from the high Mountains of Taiwan. With tall marbled purplish stems bearing up to two, large radiating leaves with lanceolate radiating leaflets, ending in long filiform tips. Spathe can be green or dark purple-white striped, spadix cylindrical. To 1.7mts.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ256

kelung-insulare

Our own introduction from the high Mountains of Taiwan. With tall marbled purplish stems bearing up to two, large radiating leaves with lanceolate radiating leaflets, ending in long filiform tips. Spathe can be green or dark purple-white striped, spadix cylindrical. To 1.7mts.

Arisaema (Araceae)

negeshii

A slender species, with two pedate leaves, borne on a stem to 20cm. Spathe, pale green, with a darker recurved opening. Spadix purplish, long narrow and strongly erect. Requires good drainage below the tuber.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ9706

petelotii

A flamboyant new rhizomatous species which we collected seed of on Mt. Bavi accompanied by one of Hanoi's botanical institutes. Where this species had formed clumps of upright pink mottled stems to 1m tall with trifoliate broadly leafleted leaves with long acuminate tips. With at that time short spikes of bright red berries which had succeeded the distinct inflorescence, consisting of a narrow pale green fluted funnel-shaped spathe and a protruding spadix adorned with long purple stained filaments. Will require frost protection.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ551

ringens f. sieboldii

One of our collections from Taehüksan-Dõ, South Korea. A strange spathe, sets this species apart from the genus. The opening of the green spathe is black-deep purple and appears contorted into a helmet-shape, with a flared opening. Leaves, 1-2, are large trifoliate and glossy, with thin tapering tips. Surprisingly hardy in well drained shade.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ3602

taiwanense f. cinereum

Our own introduction from the high mountains of Taiwan. Remarkably sturdy mottled stems, to 1.2m, topped by a whirl broad of grey radiating leaflets, with long filiform tips. The deep purple spathe is flecked having a wide mouth over which the limb with a long filiform tip overshadows. The creamy broad spadix in indented and spongy.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ1859

taiwanense v. brevipedunculatum

Sturdy mottled stems, to 1.2m, topped by a broad whirl of radiating leaflets, with long filiform tips. On a short peduncle, deep purple spathe is flecked having a wide mouth over which the limb with a long filiform tip overshadows. The creamy broad spadix in indented and spongy. Our own introduction from the high mountains of Taiwan.

Arisaema (Araceae) BSWJ1425

thunbergii ssp. autumnale

Only recently described to science is this new subspecies from Taiwan. Emerging after the heat of summer with the familiar divided foliage with acuminate tips. Soon unfurling a pale striped spathe with a dark throat, out of which the long filiform spadix dangles. Divisions only from our collected stock.

Aristea (Iridaceae) GWJ9469

ecklonii

From seed we collected in the highlands of Sri Lanka in 2002, from plants that had naturalised. Originating from grassland and scrub of South Africa's Eastern Cape to Tanzania. With basal leaves in a fan bearing mauve-blue starry flowers on upright stems, in the morning fading by afternoon, although capable of flowering off and on throughout the year. Best grown in a well drained but moisture retentive soil in full sun, protecting from damaging frosts.

Aristolochia (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ13511

californica

Too many favourites in this genus, this being just one of them, along with fond memories of our time with Sean Hogan in Oregon during the summer of 2013 and autumn 2014. Near Portland is where we collected the seed of this vigorous, yet suitably restrained twining climber to 3.5m, with heart shaped fealty leaves to about 10cm long. The foliage only appearing during the latter period of the flowering, in the form of tubby saxophones with large flared tawny-pink lips. Best sited to allow sunlight to backlight the plants in spring when the bare stems are crowded with translucent flowers, according to Dan Hinkley. Best grown in a leafy soil with good drainage in sun or light shade.

Aristolochia (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ293

kaempferi

Woody-based, twining climber, with heart shaped, elongated leaves, greyish-white beneath. Producing yellow brown throated flowers, followed by longitudinally ribbed seed capsules. Our collection from Wuling Farm Taiwan.

Aristolochia (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ8433

manshuriensis

Strong growing very hardy woody-stemmed, twining climber, with heart shaped leaves. Producing good sized yellow brown throated inflated saxophone shaped flowers which are followed by large longitudinally ribbed seed capsules. One of our own introductions from Chuwangsan, South Korea.

Aristolochia (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ12557

manshuriensis

One of the best of its kind. A twinning long-lived eventually woody stemmed climber bearing the unusually shaped saxophone or Dutchman’s pipe shaped yellow-green flowers with red flecking in its throat. Born well before its spectacular heart-shaped foliage which unroll a fresh green transforming to a butter yellow by the autumn, particularly when grown in good light. A very hardy easily grown climber of large proportions eventually, probably resenting being moved, thriving in a well drained moisture retentive soil in good light. Our seed collection from South Korea in 2010.

Aristolochia (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ13600

sempervirens

A very amenable slender stemmed small twining climbing species arising from a woody base, with small glossy semi-evergreen heart shaped leaves of a parchment texture. Producing an abundance of bright yellow throated flowers with pinkie-purple saxophone shaped exteriors, from early spring through to early winter, followed by small plump sausage-shaped seed capsules into the winter. Easily grown in good light preferably south or west facing, in any type of drained fertile soil. A seed collection from William Waterfield's garden in Menton south of France

Artemisia (Asteraceae) BSWJ088

kawakamii

An evergreen alpine well branched dwarf shrub that we collected from Hohuanshan one of the high peaks of the Central Mountains of Taiwan in 1992. Where we found it growing into soft rock and shiest draped in cooling clouds. With aromatic, grey-green leaves which are silver when grown dry. Best grown in full sun to part shade in a well drained poor soil that does not dry out. Height 15cm. Spread 50cm.

Aruncus (Rosaceae) BSWJ4475

'Little Gem'

From one of our own collections, gathered from the forest on the lower slopes of the volcano Hallasan, which dominates the island of Cheju-Dõ. Located between the Korean Peninsular and Japan, growing on and amongst large boulders on a shady dried up riverbed. Forming neat clumps of finely fretted leaves, with branching spikes of white flowers to a mere 20cm tall in those nutrient starved conditions. Easily grown in any type of good fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Originally offered as A. aethusifolius, but now considered to be an undescribed species endemic to Cheju-Dõ.

Aruncus (Rosaceae) BSWJ8624

asiaticus

The variety which we find in Korean of this imposing extremely hardy perennial, where it only attained a height of less than 1m. Where we found it growing in a hostile environment on Woraksan one of the mountain ranges of the cold interior. Here it formed clumps of 2-3 parted large basal leaves surrounding the upright stems bearing the large plumes of creamy-white flowers. The young shoots commonly used as a vegetable in Korea. Easily grown in any good soil in sun or shade.

Asarum (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ1726

albomaculatum

Low perennial with creeping elongated rhizomatous roots. Leaves 2-3 per stem are heart shaped white-maculate on their upper surfaces, reminiscent of Cyclamen. Flowers are three lobed borne near the ground. For a shady moist site. Our collection from Taiwan

Asarum (Aristolochiaceae)

caudatum

Evergreen prostrate rhizomatous perennial with large cordate (heart-shaped) leathery leaves and unusual tri-lobed brown flowers with very long tail-like ends to the petals (caudate), appearing May-July. Height 15cm, spread indefinite. Easily grown in full-partial shade growing faster in a moisture retentive soil, although we find them quite drought tolerant.

Asarum (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ3628

hypogynum

Low perennial with creeping elongated rhizomatous roots. Large leaves are heart shaped greenish-yellow maculate on their upper surfaces, reminiscent of Cyclamen. Flowers are dark-purple cream-centred, borne near the ground. For a shady moist site.

Asarum (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ1994

infrapurpureum

Perennial with elongated rhizomatous roots. Leaves 1-5 per stem are pointed heart shaped white-maculate on their upper surfaces reddish-purple beneath. Flowers are purple borne near the ground. For a shady moist site.

Asarum (Aristolochiaceae)

longerhizomatosum

A newly introduced evergreen species from China. Low perennial with long creeping elongated rhizomatous roots. Leaves 2-3 per stem are heart shaped reminiscent of Cyclamen. The black and white flowers are three lobed borne near the ground. For a sheltered shady moist site.

Asarum (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ1691

macranthum

Our collection from Taiwan, of this low perennial with creeping elongated rhizomatous roots. Leaves are heart shaped greenish-yellow maculate on their upper surfaces, reminiscent of Cyclamen. Flowers are dark-purple borne near the ground. For a shady moist site.

Asarum (Aristolochiaceae)

splendens

A newly introduced species from China, which is a low perennial with creeping elongated rhizomatous roots. Leaves 2-3 per stem are heart shaped white-maculate on their upper surfaces, reminiscent of Cyclamen. Flowers are three lobed ruffled and whitish at the mouth, borne near the ground. For a shady moist site.

Asarum (Aristolochiaceae) BSWJ1688

taipingshanianum

Our collection from Taipingshan, Taiwan. Low perennial with creeping elongated rhizomatous roots. Leaves 2-3 per stem are heart shaped white-maculate on their upper surfaces, reminiscent of Cyclamen. Flowers are three lobed borne near the ground. For a shady moist site.

Asparagus (Asparagaceae) BSWJ8309

aff. meioclados

From wild collected seed we found on Fansipan the highest mountain in northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2000. Growing in the dense forest forming a shrubby plant to 1m tall from tuberous roots. A much branched plant which were covered in tiny bristle-like green leaves and speckled with red rounded small fruit. Esily grown in any type of fertile soil in sun or shade.

Asparagus (Asparagaceae) BSWJ8814

schoberioides

A perennial or herbaceous species which is dormant in winter retreating to a woody base. Forming a bush of flexuous wiry green stems clothed in small flattish leaves affording a soft ferny effect, to 75 cm tall. Bearing small greenish flowers in the summer followed by red globose fruit by the autumn on female plants. From one of our wild collected seed we found on the island of Chejudõ the southern most island of South Korea in the autumn of 2001. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade.

Aspidistra (Asparagaceae) BSWJ6863

daibuensis 'Yuli Yummy'

From one of our collections from Yuli in southern Taiwan gathered in 1999. A form of this species, which we have been increasing for many years, This form was distinct amongst the many colonies we found growing in the shaded areas of the dry valley, by the tall to 1m, oblong-lanceolate leaves being more heavily spotted and streaked in white than any others in this area. Bearing its unusual creamy starry flowers with red-purple interiors at ground level in mid-winter for us. This species grows quite happily for us in well drained dark shade out of doors sheltered from freezing winds. Avoid sodden soil/composts.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ377

attenuata 'Dungpu Dazzler'

Possibly the most floriferous selection of any species in cultivation. An evergreen perennial arising from thickened creeping scaly rhizomes, forming dense colonies of long petioles, bearing long glossy deep green, yellow to white spotted leaves to a meter tall, 10-15cm wide. In this form the pale yellow tubular-campanulate flowers with 7-8 reflexed lobes are produced in ridiculous quantities carpeting the ground in warm conditions October to January. The flowers are borne just above ground level, while the stigma of this species is easily identifiable looking like a blown out umbrella. From our first expedition to Taiwan in 1992 from a very well drained shady area near the village of Dungpu (Tungpu), at the base of Yushan, Taiwan's highest mountain, part of their Central Mountain Range.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ2001

attenuata 'Xitou Starlet'

An evergreen perennial species arising from a slowly creeping thickened scaly rhizome. Which we collected from the Experimental Forest, part of The Taiwan University at Hsitou in the winter of 1993. Where it formed a large colony which enveloped a huge boulder, only obtaining moisture from the debris and leafmould accumulated above its rhizomes. With faintly spotted and streaked leaves to around 1m long held on short petioles encased in a purple sheath, bearing purple-yellow edged flowers at ground level. Easily grown in a well drained compost kept on the dry side in winter, out of doors best grown in evergreen shade in a well drained soil, frosts may scorch the foliage.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ312b

daibuensis 'Taiwan Stars'

Hardy evergreen perennial, arising from strong creeping densely scaly rhizomes, in time forming dense colonies of broadly lanceolate glossy deep green leaves, with few sometimes pale yellow spots. Annually producing yellowish tinted campanulate purple-pink many rayed flowers at ground level, followed by a globose green berry. Flowering in early winter for us, as well as in North Carolina (Tony Avent), where the flowering is abundant in their hotter climate. Height 1m. Collected from a very well drained densely shady area on the South X Highway, in Taiwan on our first expedition there in 1992.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ6866

daibuensis 'Tidy Trim'

A smaller form of this Taiwanese species we found in 1999 in the south of Hualien County, where it grew on the edge of the path. Under these conditions the leaves were only 10cm long while the habit was tight, forming a dense carpet of lightly spotted leaves. After cultivating since that time the leaves have become much larger closer to 60cm long, but narrow to only 5-7.5cm, while retaining the dense habit.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ3236

daibuensis 'Totally Dotty'

A distinct form of this species, which we have grown for many years, originating from a single plant we selected from the forest overlooking the South Cross Highway, southern Taiwan, which was still only a track at that time in 1996. This form was distinct amongst the colony we found by the broad oblong-lanceolate leaves being more heavily spotted and streaked in white than any others, to 1 m tall. This species grows quite happily for us in well drained dark shade out of doors sheltered from freezing winds. Avoid sodden soil/composts.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ1953

mushaensis

From the small area of Wushe, a new species to cultivation that we collected as long ago as 1993, in The Central Mountains of Taiwan where it is endemic to. The species bears dark fat flower buds in July for us spreading their fleshy petals late in the month through to August or September. The leaves are held on long stiff petioles, while the lanceolate-oblanceolate leaves are sometimes lightly spotted and streaked. Easily grown in a container in a well drained compost out of strong sunlight or in a sheltered shaded site in the garden. The plants resent too much moisture.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ1949

mushaensis 'Spotty Dotty'

A new species to cultivation that we collected a plant of as long ago as 1993, from the small area of The Central Mountains of Taiwan, which it is endemic to. The species bears fat flower buds in July for us spreading their fleshy petals late in the month through to August or September. On this form the leaves are held on long stiff petioles, while the lanceolate-oblanceolate leaves are distinctly lightly dusted with creamy yellow spots and streaks. Easily grown in a container in a well drained compost out of strong sunlight or in a sheltered shaded site in the garden. The plants resent too much moisture.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae)

saxicola 'Uan Fat Lady'

see :- Aspidistra zongbayi 'Uan Fat Lady'

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ5216

subrotata 'Chiang-dao Charmer'

From one of our collections gathered in 1997 from Doi Chiang-dao a high limestone mountain in northern Thailand within the Golden Triangle. Where it formed loose colonies of unusually mottled and faintly striped leaves, which only had short petioles bearing the narrowly elliptic leaves. Spreading from a thick scaly rhizome only bearing one or two leaves at intervals sometimes with the distinct campanulate flower at ground level followed by large grape-sized fruit. Best grown in a shaded container in a humus rich but very well drained compost avoiding over watering. Best kept frost free until trialled. Previously offered as A. sutepensis.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae) BSWJ6645

sutepensis 'Pha-hom Pok-adot'

Originating from one of our collections gathered in 1998 from almost at the summit of the remote Doi Pha-Hom Pok, Thailand's second highest peak at 2250m, within the infamous Golden Triangle. Where it formed a large scattered colony of unusually lightly mottled and faintly striped leaves, which only had short petioles bearing the broadly elliptic arching leaves. Spreading from a thick rhizome sometimes with the distinct campanulate flower at ground level followed by large grape-sized fruit. Best grown in a shaded container in a humus rich but well drained compost avoiding over watering. Keep frost free. Previously offered as species from Thailand.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae)

tonkinensis

An evergreen perennial which emerges from a thin slowly creeping rhizome. Forming small colonies of upright parchment textured glossy leaves which are oblong-lanceolate 13-20 cm long by 4-5.5 cm wide on petioles to 13 cm long. Bearing solitary campanulate 6-lobed purple flowers late summer to autumn. Best grown in shade in a container of well drained organic compost sheltered from severe frost, or outside in a very sheltered almost frost free spot.

Aspidistra (Convallariaceae)

zongbayi 'Uan Fat Lady'

A small species from China, that we found in a Japanese nursery in this wonderful more decorative form, with distinct small broadly oval bright green leaves, generally to only 20cm long x 8cm wide, born on slender petioles to 15cm long. The slightly undulating margined leaves are a paler green than most other species, speckled with very pale fuzzy greenish-yellow, as well as bearing a broad central area of pale irregular streaking. Best grown in shade kept dry in winter, hardiness not tested.

Aster (Asteraceae) WJC13657

albescens

Only forming relatively small deciduous shrubs generally to 1m tall in the wild, appearing fairly gregarious where it occurs. Of a lax habit with lanceolate long pointed leaves to 12cm long and flat topped branched corymbs of lilac yellow centred ray flowers June to September. Easily grown in a well drained fertile soil, best in full sun to light shade. From one of our seed collections gathered in the northern Himalayas in the autumn of 2013.

Asteropyrum (Ranunculaceae)

cavaleri

An evergreen little gem from China, in mountainous woodlands. Short creeping rhizome, bearing irregularly toothed almost square peltate leaves, delicately veined white. Below the 12-20cm stems, having white flowers April-May. Well drained shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BWJ8178

chinensis

An imposing species I collected near Baoxing, China in 2000. Arising from a creeping rootstock this rhizomatous perennial forms upright stems to 1.2m, in the wild. Bearing bipinnately divided elegant foliage topped by narrow panicles of pink flowers. Best in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ8583

chinensis v. davidii

Slender perennial variety growing from a stout rhizome, which differs from the normal species primarily in only forming clumps without running. With upright short bristly stems to 70cm tall, bearing few biternately divided basal leaves on spindly stems and terminal stiffly upright longer branched panicles of soft-pink flowers July-August. Our collection from the base of a dripping cliff, close to the De Militarised Zone of South Korea in 2001. Best in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ8435

chinensis v. davidii

Slender perennial variety growing from a stout rhizome, which differs from the normal species primarily in only forming clumps without running. With upright short bristly stems to 80cm tall, bearing few biternately divided basal leaves on spindly stems and terminal stiffly upright longer branched panicles of soft-pink flowers July-August. Our collection from the Soraksan area of South Korea in 2001. Best in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ968

chinensis v. davidii

Slender perennial variety growing from a stout rhizome, which differs from the normal species primarily in only forming clumps without running. With upright short bristly stems to 70cm tall, bearing few biternately divided basal leaves on spindly stems and terminal stiffly upright longer branched panicles of soft-pink flowers July-August. Our collection from the Soraksan area of South Korea in 1993. Best in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ8645

chinensis v. davidii

Slender perennial variety growing from a stout rhizome, which differs from the normal species primarily in only forming clumps without running. With upright short bristly stems to 80cm tall, bearing few biternately divided basal leaves on spindly stems and terminal stiffly upright longer branched panicles of soft-pink flowers July-August. Our collection from the Woraksan area of South Korea in 2001. Best in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade. ****************************** These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ8680

koreana

A short perennial species with stout short rhizomatous roots, with short stiff stems to only 60cm tall. Bearing few twice parted rugose basal leaves and terminal upwardly inclined long branched panicles of palest pink or lilac to pure white flowers June-July. Our collection from T'aebaeksan a mountain in the cold interior of South Korea. Best in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ8611

koreana

A short perennial species with stout short rhizomatous roots, with short stiff stems to only 60cm tall. Bearing few twice parted rugose basal leaves and terminal long branched panicles of palest-pink flowers in this collection June-July. Our collection from the Sobaeksan area of South Korea. Best in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ6711

longicarpa

From one of our seed collections in the high mountains of Taiwan, where this species is endemic. Clump-forming perennial with erect stems 40-150cm tall, with long stemmed divided leaves, bearing 30-60 cm long terminal panicles of white flowers, July-September. For a moist soil, sun to part shade.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ11085

microphylla

A small slender species we collected seed of from a grassy boggy area of Hiroshima, southern Honshu Japan in 2005. Here it formed slender stems to 30cm with slender, but congested panicles of white flowers July- August above the 3-5 leafleted pinnate foliage. Easily grown in sun or part shade in a moisture retentive soil.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) GWJ9366

rivularis

Unbeatable for leaf texture amongst this genus of moisture lovers. Forming robust clumps of bi-tri pinnately divided leaves with impressed venation to 1m wide. With tall arching stems to 2 m bearing terminal creamy-white pyramidal un-branched inflorescences mid-late summer. Easily grown in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade. Our collection from the Lachung Valley, Eastern Sikkim in 2002.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BWJ8076a

rivularis v. myriantha

From seed I collected near Baoxing China of an imposing species with tall stems to 2m+. Bearing few large twice-thrice divided greyish thick textured basal leaves, composed of large ovate leaflets. Inflorescence a large terminal laxly branched arching panicle of white flowers July-September. Best in a soil that does not dry out in sun to part shade.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ10946

thunbergii v. aff. formosa

Clump-forming, rhizomatous perennial that we collected seed of in the mountains of Niigata, Japan. Where we found this species growing in abundance on moist vertical banks in part shade. Here it formed mounds of thin textured divided foliage with upright slender few branched stems to 1m tall of white flowers ageing to a pinkie hue July- August. Easily grown in any type of moisture retentive fertile soil, in sun or part shade. ******************************These plants are only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ10961

thunbergii v. congesta

Clump-forming, rhizomatous perennial that we collected seed of in the mountains of Nagano, Japan in 2005. Where we found this species growing on moist banks in part shade at the edge of the forest. Here it formed mounds of thin textured divided foliage with upright branched stems to 1m tall of congested white flowers larger than the norm, ageing to a pinkie hue July- August. Easily grown in any type of moisture retentive fertile soil, in sun or part shade.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ5622

thunbergii v. hachijoensis

Rhizomatous perennial that we collected seed of in the high mountains of the Kinki District, Central Japan. Where we found it growing amongst large boulders in moist ground in the shade of low trees. Here it formed low mounds of finely divided thick-textured foliage with densely branched stems white flowers ageing to a pinkie hue July-August.******************************As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ10975

thunbergii v. okuyamae

Clump-forming, rhizomatous perennial that we collected seed of in the mountains of Niigata, Japan in 2005. Where we found this species growing on moist banks in part shade at the edge of the forest. There it only formed small plants with divided ferny glossy foliage, with upright slender stems to 40 cm tall of white flowers ageing to a pinkie hue July- August. Easily grown in any type of moisture retentive fertile soil, in sun or part shade. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ11534

thunbergii v. sikokumontanum

From one of our seed collections gathered in 2006 on the high mountains of Ehime on the Japanese island of Shikoku, where this clump-forming, rhizomatous perennial, grew at the edge of the forest on a high mountain pass. Here it formed low mounds of 3-ternate relatively thick-textured doubly serrated narrow foliage with branched stems 40-80cm tall with pyramidal panicles of white flowers ageing to a pinkie hue from late May-July. Easily grown in a moisture retentive soil in good light.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ11164

thunbergii v. sikokumontanum

Clump-forming, rhizomatous perennial that we collected seed of in the high mountains of Yakushima, South Japan. Where we found it growing amongst large boulders in moist ground in the shade of low trees. Here it formed low mounds of finely divided foliage with branched stems white flowers ageing to a pinkie hue July- August.

Astilbe (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ6125

thunbergii v. terrestris

Clump-forming, rhizomatous perennial that we collected seed of in the high mountains of Yakushima, South Japan. Where we found it growing amongst large boulders in moist ground in the shade of low trees. Here it formed low mounds of finely divided foliage with branched stems white flowers ageing to a pinkie hue July- August.

Astrantia (Apiaceae)

'Buckland'

Clump forming perennial producing posy-like, pink-tipped flowers, backed by large green and white bracts, throughout summer-autumn. With a dense mass of divided mid green basal leaves. Height 60cm. Spread 45cm. Good in sun or shade.

Astrantia (Apiaceae)

major 'Sunningdale Variegated'

Clump forming perennial producing greenish pink-tinged flower heads throughout summer-autumn with a dense mass of divided variegated leaves. Height 60cm spread 45cm. Good in sun or shade. Better foliage without flowers. ******************************As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Astrantia (Apiaceae)

minor

A diminutive species of this perennial producing small greenish-white flower heads July-August, above divided palmate mid green basal leaves. Originating from stony partly shaded acidic areas of the Pyrenees as well as western and central Alps. Height 10-30cm. spread 15cm. A difficult and slow plant to cultivate, requiring un-pampered conditions.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae) BSWJ11815

aff. chlorascens

Described as being a shrub or tree, although we have yet to encounter anything approaching tree-like proportions, where we have made many collections of this species. Only forming dark green stemmed shrubs to 3m tall, normally is fairly shaded conditions, rarely in the open. With parchment textured dark green oblong leaves with prominently impressed venation above and few conspicuously tipped marginal teeth. Bearing loose panicles of reddish-brown male flowers with long caudate tips to the petals. Meanwhile the female flowers are held in tight congested inflorescences, followed by long ellipsoid red fruit, early spring for us. Best grown in moisture retentive drained soil, shaded from strong sunlight and cold winds.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae) Og 95.038

himalaica v. dolichophylla

So far only forming a small slow growing shrub with dark green stems for us. While the faintly yellow spotted dark green leaf blades are narrowly lanceolate or lanceolate, 9-18 × 1.5-3.5 cm. Thinly leathery, the veins above conspicuously impressed while the margins are 4-8-serrulate, and the apex acuminate. While the male inflorescence on this clone appear March to May, they are racemose panicles all parts purplish red with dense soft trichomes when young, upper portion of trichomes purplish red. Best grown in moisture retentive drained soil, shaded from strong sunlight and cold winds.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae)

japonica 'Dentata'

An evergreen shrub composed of sturdy green branching stems bearing broad very glossy dark green leaves which are undulate and deeply toothed along their margins, in this selected female clone. Producing terminal panicles of purplish flowers in mid spring, followed by sealing-wax red berries by the following winter, when the flowers are pollinated. Height to 1.6m, spread to 1.5m across. Easily grown in light to dark shade in a fertile moisture retentive, but drained soil.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae)

japonica 'Lance Leaf'

An undeniably useful male pollinator, described as possessing lanceolate foliage. Composed of sturdy green branching stems bearing glossy dark green leaves, producing large terminal panicles of purplish male flowers in mid spring. After many years of tracking this clone down and being repeatedly disappointed by so many mis-named (poor fruiting female clones) we eventually obtaining the clone from two different sources. I have to confess that I am not impressed, when comparing it to the female clone of 'Salicifolia', but this is all that is in cultivation for the time being. This clone has elliptical leaves. Easily grown in light to dark shade in a fertile moisture retentive, but drained soil.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae)

japonica 'Salicifolia'

A highly valued evergreen shrub with stout sea-green ageing darker upright shoots which arch with age. Clothed in architectural lanceolate bright green leaves which are irregularly distantly serrated bearing purplish flowers in mid spring followed on this selected female clone by luxurious quantities of ceiling-wax red berries when pollinated, in the depth of winter until spring. Height 1.7m Spread 1.7m. Easily grown in any type of reasonably fertile soil, very shade tolerant and drought tolerant in shade, tending to bleach the leaves in full sun.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae)

japonica f. longifolia

An invaluable evergreen shrub with stout green ageing darker upright shoots which arch with age. Clothed in architectural elongate-lanceolate bright green leaves which are irregularly distantly serrated bearing purplish-brown flowers in mid spring followed on this female clone by luxurious bright red berries, when pollinated, in the depth of winter. Height 1.7m Spread 1.7m. Easily grown in any type of reasonably fertile soil, very shade tolerant and drought tolerant in shade, tending to bleach the leaves in full sun.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae)

japonica v. viridis

By popular demand as seen in our walled garden at Crûg a cultivar of this very amenable shade loving evergreen shrub which is clothed in bright green deeply toothed glossy leaves, importantly without the ubiquitous spotting popularised in the Victorian era. Bearing purplish flowers in mid spring followed on this female clone by luxurious bright red berries when pollinated, in the depth of winter. Height 1.5m Spread 1.5m. Easily grown in any type of reasonably fertile soil, very shade and drought tolerant, the leaves tending to bleach in full sun.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae) CWJ12898

japonica var borealis female

A dwarf variety of this evergreen shrub with green young stems to only 30-40cm tall bearing broad glossy orbicular dark un-spotted foliage, prominently toothed along their margins. Generally seen as an understorey shrub, where we have seen it forming wide sprawling self-layering colonies in the cold forests of northern Honshu. Producing terminal panicles of purplish flowers in mid spring, followed by sealing-wax red berries by the following winter. Easily grown in light to dark shade in a fertile moisture retentive, but drained soil.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae) BSWJ2864

omeiensis

A rare gem originating from E'meishan Sichuan China, where this large multi-stemmed shrub to 4m tall grows in dense shade on a very steep forested mountainside. Bearing stiff large thick-textured 30cm long pale green serrated leaves and elongated terminal spikes of pale green 2cm long fruit, turning red in time. Best grown in a moisture retentive drained soil with protection from severe cold, hardy to -16C (to date). Raised from cuttings of a Japanese cultivated male clone.

Aucuba (Aucubaceae) BWJ8048

omeiensis

A rare gem which I collected the seed of in the company of Dan Hinkley on our ascent up E'meishan Sichuan in 2000. Where this large multi-stemmed shrub to 4m tall grew in dense shade on a very steep forested mountainside. Bearing stiff large thick-textured 30cm long pale green serrated leaves and elongated terminal spikes of pale green 2cm long fruit, turning red in time. Best grown with protection from severe cold winds, in a moisture retentive drained soil. Hardy to -15C (to date). Cuttings raised clones of individual seedlings offered. Clones B, D, G available, please state your preference.

Azara (Flacourtiaceae)

serrata

Evergreen, upright shrub with glossy, bright green foliage and rounded bunches of fragrant yellow flowers in late spring or early summer. Requires full sun and well-drained soil. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Beesia (Ranunculaceae)

calthifolia

A rare evergreen close relative of Actaea, from mountainous forests in China. Forming dense clumps of cordate glossy and leathery leaves, embossed with highlighted venation, all colouring up through the winter months. Bearing upright spikes to 30cm tall of starry white flowers for several months from April. Well drained shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BWJ7858

'Candy Floss'

A charming small perennial, which I collected seed of on The Cangshan near Dali Yunnan China. Growing on shady moist cliffs, bearing matt-green bristly serrulately margined obliquely ovate-orbicular leaves on short stems. With multiple plume-like inflorescences of small soft-pink flowers held on reddish stems just above the foliage from August to frost. Best in a container or testing in a sheltered corner.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BWJ7772

'Wild Swan'

A tiny species I collected seed of at high elevation in Yunnan, China. Where it was clinging on to shady vertical cliffs, with small pale green palmate-ovate leaves on stems to 10cm, bearing at that time white flowers and winged seed heads. Untested for hardiness, but given its provenance it should be relatively hardy in a drained soil, sheltered from the worse weather.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BWJ8133

aff. sinensis

Similar in habit to its Japanese counterpart B. grandis, this is my collection of this wonderful woodland perennial from China. With palmate leaves and earlier flowering than B. grandis, the pink flowers are held above the foliage at 50cm. Best in a woodsy soil in full-part shade, flowering July-frost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) HWJK2424

annulata

A collection from our last Nepalese expedition in 2002 with Dan Hinkley and Jamaica Kincaid, as we made our decent down the Mewa Kola a steep valley through the forests. Here clinging onto vertical cliffs were a large colony of these distinctly patterned rough textured palmate leaves with silver and brown markings. A very distinct species with large pale pink flowers emerging from red bristly buds in a long succession, to 60 cm tall. Best grown is some shelter of a woodland in moisture retentive well drained soil in warm part shade, mulch to protect the rhizomes from frost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) HWJ642

chapaensis

A small species we collected near the mountain retreat of Sapa (Chapa) in North Vietnam, an area which experiences winter frosts and snow. Growing on moss-covered rocks, with rounded-cordate leaves to only 8cm across. Bearing bright pink flowers on stems to 15cm tall. For a sheltered shady sight or container.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BSWJ1954

chitoensis

A species of this mostly tender genus that we collected from the central mountains of Taiwan. From a deep rhizome, having large obliquely ovate nearly succulent leaves to 30cm.Bearing axillary cymes of pink flowers. Best in moisture retentive well drained soil in warm part shade. Height 90cm, flowering June-frost. Hardy here to -9C.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BSWJ10479

ferruginea

From a seed collection we gathered on our return to San Jose from Panama in the high Cordillera de Talamanca. Of a charming white flowering species which had formed a large colony in dense moist shade, of lax stems to only 50cm with ovate-elongated doubly-serrated leaves 15cm long and 3-winged seed capsules. Best in a container or testing in a sheltered shady area in a drained fertile moisture retentive soil.

Begonia (Begoniaceae)

grandis 'Sapporo'

A very hardy form of this species from Sapporo, the capital city of Hokkaido the northern island of Japan, where the winters are severe. Distinct in foliage in this form, with large palmate dark green leaves, dark red below. On erect stems that are red at the nodes, which in turn producing bulbils in the autumn. The pink flowers are borne in terminal sprays opening from reddish buds in late summer. Best in a woodsy soil in warm full-part shade. Height 90cm, flowering August-frost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BSWJ11188

grandis ssp. evansiana

From a collection we gathered from the forest floor, situated at the base of the snow capped Fuji-San at 650m, in the autumn of 2005. Where this hardy species, of a mostly tender genus, grew in deep pine needle litter. With large palmate leaves, dark red on their undersides, which had borne sprays of pink flowers opening from reddish buds. Best in a woodsy soil in full-part shade. Height 90cm, flowering August-frost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BSWJ10279

large sp. from Mexico

Incredulous was our first thought when we first encountered this species in the wilds of Chiapas in the south of Mexico in 2004. Where it grew on a steep shaded bank along with Gunnera, forming spreading colonies of enormous rounded leaves to 1m across, on equally tall hairy stems. With large panicles of pale pink flowers ageing to pink large winged seed capsules, from the branching stems which formed aerial rhizomes, which drop to the ground and root. Best in a container or testing in a sheltered shady area in a drained fertile moisture retentive soil.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BSWJ2692

palmata see B. panchtharensis

Collected as a dormant rhizome from the Lachung valley N.E.Sikkim, a hardy (here to -9C) species. With large deeply lobed fleshy leaves to 40cm long on darkly mottled stems. Bearing axillary cymes of pink flowers. Best in moisture retentive well drained soil in warm part shade. Height 60cm, flowering July-frost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BSWJ2692

panchtharensis

Formerly identified as B. sikkimensis, but now considered to be a recently describes species first discovered in eastern Nepal. Collected as a dormant rhizome from the Lachung valley N.E.Sikkim, a hardy (here to -9C) species. With large deeply lobed fleshy leaves to 40cm long on darkly mottled stems. Bearing axillary cymes of pink flowers. Best in moisture retentive well drained soil in warm part shade. Height 60cm, flowering July-frost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) DJHC98473

pedatifida

One of Dan Hinkley’s collections from E'meishan Sichuan at 3000m, which has proved to be hardy. Forming clumps of thick rhizomes bearing bold deeply lobed leaves to 20cm across on upright stalks, with sprays of white flowers mid-to late summer. Easily grown in a humus rich soil that is drained, in part shade, mulching the rhizomes to protect them from severe frost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BSWJ7245

putii

A charmingly small species from seed we collected from Thailand's section of the notorious Golden Triangle, at well over 2,000m elevation. Forming small tubers which nestle in vertical moss on large lime stone boulders and cliffs. Bearing small ovate leaves on red stems to 10cm with small pink flowers nudging above them in late summer. Untried for hardiness, best in a free drained compost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BSWJ2692

sikkimensis see B. panchtharensis

Only recently described to science as a new un-recorded species which was previously thought to be B. sikkimense collected from eastern Sikkim in 1994. Meanwhile B. panchtharensis had only previously been recorded from eastern Nepal. For details please see B. panchtharensis

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BWJ8011a

sinensis

Similar in habit to its Japanese counterpart B. grandis, this is my collection of this wonderful woodland perennial from China. With smaller leaves and earlier flowering than B. grandis, the pink flowers are held above the foliage at 30cm. Best in a woodsy soil in full-part shade, flowering July-frost.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BWJ8011

sinensis 'Red Undies'

Not too dissimilar in habit to its Japanese bulbil bearing counterpart B. grandis, but with smaller narrowly palmate leaves on more upright stems and earlier pink flowers held above the foliage. This is a selection made from my collection of this wonderful woodland perennial from China, where the leaves are enhanced dark red on their undersides. Best in a woodsy soil in full-part shade, flowering July-frost. Height 30cm.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) EDHCM042

taliensis

From one of Eric Hammond's collections gathered in China in 1997. A luxuriously black and silver patterned foliage species which has proved to be hardy in sheltered woodland conditions under trial in the Pacific Northwest of the USA. Bearing jagged-edged leaves which emerge as late as June with sprays of pink flowers to 35cm. Easily grown in a sheltered woodland type of situation in a drained yet moisture retentive soil.

Begonia (Begoniaceae) BWJ8119

wynn-jonesiae 'Pink Lady'

Originating from seed I collected in Central Sichuan, China in 2000, but has only recently been named for my better half (Sue), by Julian Shaw who identified it as an undescribed species. In the wild this species was growing on very shady vertical rocks, forming small clumps of reddish stems to 20cm tall, with pale green palmate leaves and inflorescences, of at that time pinkish flowers and winged seed heads, held just above the leaves. Best in a container or testing for hardiness in a sheltered corner, hardy for us in our woodland garden.

Belamcanda (Iridaceae) BSWJ11373

chinensis 'Crûg Colossal'

An upright, bulbous perennial with flat fan-like pale green foliage and slender upright branched stems to 1m tall. Bearing wide open starry orange to yellow red-spotted flowers to 5cm across, from June to August. Followed by inflated seed capsules which bust open to reveal the black seed within. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in a warm to hot situation, in full sun to light shade. From one of our collections gathered from the Kii Peninsular Central Japan in the autumn of 2006. Hardy to -15C.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) BSWJ10672

aff. verticillata

A flamboyant evergreen species we collected seed of from high altitude close to Volcán Ruiz in the Colombian Paramo. Where it only attained a height of 1.3m with upright stems with 3 slender spines in the axils of the leathery spiny leaves 7.5cm long. Bearing large terminal panicles of orange-yellow flowers, followed by bloomy fruit. Easily grown in sun or light shade in any type of fertile drained soil.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) BSWJ8539

amurensis v. latifolia

Small sparsely spined shrub to 2m, with softly spiny rounded green leaves glaucous beneath, which colour up magnificently in the autumn. Good sized clusters of yellow flowers are followed by large racemes of oblong, dull red berries. A form we collected on the remote island of Ullüngdõ, South Korea. For well drained soil. *** *** *** *** *** *** *** Larger open ground/bare rooted plants best in winter. The pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) BSWJ10769

goudotii

We were very excited on our initial encounter with this colourful species in September of 2004 on the Paramo to the south of Bogota Colombia. As at that time the flower buds were red and swollen to busting point. The foliage would have sufficed as the elliptic few spined leaves were dark and glossy above but close to white below. Returning to collect the black fruit in December we were able to see plenty of the bright orange-yellow flowers held in generous panicles. Easily grown in sun or light shade in any type of fertile drained soil.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) BSWJ2432

insignis v. insignis

An erect evergreen shrub, to 2-3m, for the milder or sheltered gardens. Leaves relatively large with numerous spiny teeth. Yellow flowers borne in axillary clusters, followed by black fruit. Our collection from Sikkim.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) BSWJ2124

macrosepala v. macrosepala

Small spiny deciduous shrub of compact habit, with shining dark green leaves glaucous beneath. Several yellow flowers are followed by large oblong, dull red pendant berries. A form we collected on the Sandakphu ridge N. India.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) KWJ12280

subacuminata

Apparently a very rare species only known from one Chinese peak previous to our discovery of this evergreen species in 2007. Where we found it growing on the exposed ridge of Fansipu, considered to be the second highest to Fansipan in northern Vietnam. Here it only formed low congested shrubs to around a meter tall in that exposed site. Forming a wide colony with elliptic-lanceolate subleathery leaves with 8-15-spinose-serrate on each side while the yellow flowers are 2-6-fascicled borne in March-April, followed by ellipsoid dark fruit. Best grown in good light in a fertile drained soil.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) FMWJ13290

subacuminata

Apparently a very rare species only known from one Chinese peak previous to our discovery of this evergreen species in 2007. Where we found it growing on the exposed ridge of Fansipu, considered to be the second highest to Fansipan in northern Vietnam. Here it only formed low congested shrubs to around a meter tall in that exposed site. Forming a wide colony with elliptic-lanceolate subleathery leaves with 8-15-spinose-serrate on each side while the yellow flowers are 2-6-fascicled borne in March-April, followed by ellipsoid dark fruit. Best grown in good light in a fertile drained soil.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) BSWJ2646d

virescens

Small spiny shrub of compact habit, with shining dark green leaves which are glaucous beneath, held on upright to arching stems which are a brilliant red in their first winter. Bearing clusters of yellow flowers in the upper leaf axils which are followed by large globular, dull red pendant berries. A form we collected in Northeast Sikkim in 1994, which is best pruned hard to encourage the red stems. Easily grown in any fertile soil in sun or part shade.

Berberis (Berberidaceae) WJC13689

virescens

Only forming small spiny shrubs with a relatively compact habit, clothed in glabrous dark green leaves which are glaucous beneath. Held on upright to arching stems, where we found this species, growing in eastern Himalayas in the autumn of 2013 at 3200m. Bearing clusters of yellow flowers in the upper leaf axils which are followed by pear-shaped, red pendant berries. A noticeable feature of this species is the brilliant red young stems which are born over the branch's first winter. This can be encouraged by pruning some branches hard to encourage the red stems. Easily grown in any fertile soil in sun or part shade.

Bergenia (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ2693

pacumbis

From a seed collection we gathered on our return to San Jose from Panama in the high Cordillera de Talamanca. Of a charming white flowering species which had formed a large colony in dense moist shade, of lax stems to only 50cm with ovate-elongated doubly-serrated leaves 15cm long and 3-winged seed capsules. Best in a container or testing in a sheltered shady area in a drained fertile moisture retentive soil.

Betula (Betulaceae)

alleghaniensis

A slow-growing long-lived tree found on moist well-drained soils on the uplands and mountain ravines of eastern North America where it is commonly known as the yellow birch due to its yellowish-bronze exfoliating bark. In gardens it forms a small tree with attractive light brown bark with a silvery metallic sheen which peels into thin strips, flowering in late to mid April. At its best in the autumn when the distinctly ribbed acuminate leaves turn golden yellow.

Betula (Betulaceae) BSWJ12600

ermanii

Originating from seed we collected on Taebaeksan one of my favourite mountains in South Korea, from the old coal mining area in the bleak and harsh interior. From one of the most exposed rides, where we found a small colony of dwarfed trees resulting from the harsh elements, which seemed to be rooting into the grey stone there, with silvery white trunks peeling and flapping in the constant wind. Bearing small ovate serrated and shallowly ribbed (parallel veined) leaves and elongated upright catkins. Easily grown in a well drained not overly fed fertile soil in good light.

Betula (Betulaceae) BSWJ10852

ermanii

From seed we collected in the cold far north of Honshu around Hakkodoshan in Aomori Prefecture in 2005. From eye catching small trees with white to pinkish peeling bark carrying broadly ovate small serrated and shallowly ribbed (parallel veined) yellowed leaves 7x3cm at an exposed 950m altitude. As well as upright short spikes of seed. Easily grown in a well drained not overly fed fertile soil in good light.

Betula (Betulaceae) FMWJ13149

insignis ssp. fansipanensis

It was John Hillier that commented on one of his visits to our growing fields, that it has the best foliage of any species. Which is hardly surprising when you become acquainted with this subspecies, as they are bronzy from spring through to autumn on a handsome leaf to-boot. Ultimately growing to a sizeable tree with grey exfoliating bark with glandular villous branchlets. Bearing ovate conspicuously laterally veined serrated leaves to 12 × 5.5cm, papery in texture. With terminal reddish cylindrical catkins held upright when ripe late summer into autumn. From one of our seed collection gathered in a remote valley on our way to Phansipu northern Vietnam in 2011. Best grown in a fertile soil with some moisture retention in either sun or shade, protecting from severe cold.

Betula (Betulaceae) BSWJ11751

insignis subsp. fansipanensis

Ultimately growing to a sizeable tree with grey exfoliating bark with glandular villous branchlets. Bearing ovate conspicuously laterally veined serrated leaves to 12 × 5.5cm, papery in texture. With terminal reddish cylindrical catkins held upright when ripe late summer into autumn. From one of our seed collection gathered in a remote area of northern Vietnam close to the border with southern China. Best grown in a fertile soil with some moisture retention in either sun or shade, protecting from severe cold. *** *** *** *** *** *** *** Larger open ground/bare rooted plants best in winter. The pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Betula (Betulaceae) KA 23

michauxii

From seed we were given by Ness Botanic Gardens which they collected from trees originally collected by Kenneth Ashburner as seed from Come-by-chance, Newfoundland, Canada. Known in that area as Michaux's birch. Where it only forms a small spreading shrub to around 50cm tall, with smooth dark brown bark inset with pale lenticels. Bearing ovate-reniform leaves to 1x1.2cm, with 2-3 pairs of conspicuous pairs of lateral veins, deeply crenate-dentate round tipped and short erect cylindric catkins. Best grown in a well drained poorly fed soil with some moisture retention in good light.

Betula (Betulaceae) HWJK2250

utilis

This seed collection represents a collection we made near the Tibetan border near Thudam, Eastern Nepal, from a colony of small-large trees with wonderful bronzy peeling bark. One of the best trees available for a peeling bark effect, which soon forms a small well branched tree in any kind of reasonably moist fertile soil. Bearing ovate serrated leaves and long catkins in spring. ****************************** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Betula (Betulaceae) HWJK2345

utilis

A collection we made from Topke Gola in Eastern Nepal, from a very attractive tree with wonderful shaggy bronzy peeling bark, which we believe to be the same as Roy Lancaster selected in '71. One of the best trees available for a peeling bark effect, which soon forms a small well branched tree in any kind of reasonably moist fertile soil. Bearing ovate serrated leaves and long catkins in spring.

Betula (Betulaceae) GWJ9259

utilis

One of the best trees available for a peeling bark effect, which soon forms a small well branched tree in any kind of reasonably moist fertile soil. Bearing ovate serrated leaves and long catkins in spring. This seed collection represents a collection we made near the Tibetan border in the extreme north of Sikkim, from a small tree with a stunning dark chestnut-red bark. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Bidens (Asteraceae) BSWJ9049

aurea

Clump-forming perennial soon forming a congested base, with upright slender stems to 1m tall bearing lanceolate toothed leaves and terminal larger than the normal sized bright yellow flowers in this form, produced from late summer until autumn. For a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil. Our collection from high in the mountains around Quetzaltenango Guatemala.

Bidens (Asteraceae) BSWJ10413

triplinervia

Clump-forming prostrate growing perennial species we collected seed of at 3300m on the outrageously overgrazed slopes of Volcán Tajumulco, Guatemala's highest. Where this tiny form only attained a height of 15 cm in the starved conditions. A common sight dotted in patches on the eroding mountainside, forming slowly creeping clumps of very finely divided grey-green foliage with large yellow ray flowers 3-4cm across. For a sunny warm spot in well drained soil that has some moisture retention.

Blechnum (Blechnaceae)

chilense

Evergreen fern with large broad indented, spreading dark green fronds rising from a slowly creeping almost black rhizome, forming sizeable colonies in time. Spores are produced on separate fertile fronds. Height 1m. Spread 3m. Requires partial shade and a moist soil.

Bocconia (Papaveraceae) BSWJ14292

frutescens

One of the most dramatic foliage plants we have come across in the past few years. We have encountered it in the wild varying from large trees to sizeable shrubs, depending on its habitat. A member of the poppy family, closely related to Macleaya, hence the name. This collection represents a particularly fine form we collected seed of in Armenia, in Colombia at 3200m, which had formed a small single trunked tree. With particularly large pinnately lobed grey-green leaves to almost a meter long and a huge infructescence nearly 2m long of inflated seed pods. Best grown with some respect for frost, it is not known how much frost this genus can take, should be hardy at the root in a well drained soil in full sun.

Boenninghausenia (Rutaceae) BSWJ3112

albiflora

A rather delicate looking Rue relative, with fern-like leaves, often mistaken, with its white flowers, for Thalictrum. Will grow in sun or shade in a moisture retentive soil, given a little protection from severe cold. Height 45cm. Our own collection from the mountains of Taiwan.

Boenninghausenia (Rutaceae) BSWJ1479

albiflora

A rather delicate looking Rue relative, with fern-like leaves, often mistaken, with its sprays of white flowers for Thalictrum. Will grow in sun or shade in a retentive soil given some protection against severe cold. Height 45cm. Our own collection from the mountains of Taiwan.

Boenninghausenia (Rutaceae) BSWJ3112

albiflora pink tinged

A rather delicate looking Rue relative, with fern-like leaves, often mistaken, with its white pink tinged flowers, for Thalictrum. Will grow in sun or shade in a moisture retentive soil, given a little protection from severe cold. Height 45cm. Our own collection from the mountains of Taiwan.

Boenninghausenia (Rutaceae) BSWJ12832

japonica

A rue relative with delicate much divided rue-like glaucous foliage, held on purple-brown glossy stems to 60cm tall, where we collected the seed of this Japanese forest species in the shadow of the iconic Fuji-San in the autumn of 2005. Bearing copious quantities of Thalictrum-like small white flowers July-October. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil that is drained, in sun or part shade, protected from severe cold

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ10388

acutifolia

Herbaceous climber forming a large congested clump of tuberous roots, from which arise robust twinning stems to 3-4m tall, with broadly lanceolate alternate leaves. Bearing large terminal umbels of fiery orange-red funnel shaped pendant flowers for most of the year where we collected the seed, in dense forest at high altitude on Volcán Zunil Guatemala. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ10617

aff. acuminata

A relatively small herbaceous climbing species we collected on the road to Manizales in southern Colombia in 2004 at 2500m. Where it twined through shrubs to only a few meters high forming a clump of tuberous roots, with narrowly ovate to linear alternate leaves to12 cm long. Bearing bright red and orange flowers with darker spotting inside, in clusters of up to 14. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ10467

aff. costaricensis

A strong growing species of this herbaceous climber, forming a large congested clump of tuberous roots, from which arise robust twinning stems to 4-5m tall, with broadly lanceolate alternate leaves. Bearing large terminal umbels of bright orange long funnel shaped pendant flowers for most of the year where we collected the seed, in dense forest at 3300m on the Cordillera de Talamanca in Costa Rica in 2004. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ14376

andreana

Another colourful species that we have only encountered in the El Cocuy area close to the Venezuelan border in the February of 2015. Forming a medium sized herbaceous twining climbing species growing up small trees and scrub within a small copse at 3700m. Where it twined through to 3-4 meters arising from a clump of tuberous roots, bearing narrowly elliptic to linear alternate leaves to 12 cm long. With bright red-orange narrowly funnel-shaped flowers with spotting inside, in congested terminal umbels. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost. We find them to be very successful planted under bushy shrubs, which protect the tubers from penetrating frosts.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ14310

andreana

An unusual looking species that we have only encountered in this form in the Rio Nigro area close to Medellin in the January of 2015. A relatively small herbaceous twining species we collected growing up small shrubs within the forest of Arvi at 2400m. Where it twined through to only a couple of meters forming a clump of tuberous roots, with narrowly ovate to linear alternate leaves to 10 cm long. Bearing rusty red fluted flowers with darker spotting inside, in umbels of around 20. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost. We find them to be very successful planted under bushy shrubs, which protect the tubers from penetrating frosts.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae)

boliviensis

A small herbaceous non-climbing species forming a congested clump of tuberous roots, from which arise upright stems to 1m tall, with narrowly ovate to linear alternate leaves pressed close to the stems. Bearing flowers of pink and green in diffuse terminal inflorescences. Seed from Dan Hinkley's garden at Heronswood, USA. Syn. Alstroemeria isabellana.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae)

distichifolia

An unusual non-climbing Alstroemeria relative which forms a congested clump of tuberous roots from which arise wiry flexuous stems to 50cm long with narrowly ovate to linear alternate leaves clasping the stems. Bearing terminal clusters of small orange funnel-shaped flowers for many months in the growing season, followed by plump orange berries. Untried for hardiness by ourselves, but should be hardy if some care is taken to protect the roots. Best in a fertile drained soil in good light. Bought as Macleania, an ericaceous shrub.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ9017

edulis

A small herbaceous climber forming a congested clump of tuberous roots, from which arise slender twinning stems to 2m tall, with narrowly ovate to linear alternate leaves with white hairs below. Bearing flowers of pink and green in a diffuse inflorescences. Our seed collection made in dense forest at high altitude on Volcán San Pedro Guatemala. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost. (syn. B. hirtella)

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ10774

hirsuta

From La Calera Paramo to the south of Bogota in southern Colombia, a collection we made from a small herbaceous twining climber forming a congested clump of tuberous roots, from which arose slender twinning stems to only 1m tall (in the wild), with narrowly ovate to linear alternate leaves with soft hairs below. Bearing flowers of reddish-orange exteriors with pale orange to yellow interiors, in congested umbels mid summer through autumn for us. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ14442

hirsuta

Forming a small to medium sized herbaceous twining climber, where we collected the seed from La Callera Paramo to the south of Bogota in central Colombia at around 3050m. Arising from a congested clump of tuberous roots, from which arose slender twinning stems to 3-4m long, with narrowly ovate to linear alternate leaves with soft hairs below. Bearing flowers of reddish-orange exteriors with orange to yellow and dark spotted interiors, in congested umbels mid summer through autumn for us. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost. We find them to be very successful planted under bushy shrubs, which protect the tubers from penetrating frosts.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ14419

multiflora

Forming a medium sized herbaceous twining climber, where we collected the seed from the Cerrito Paramo on our way back from El Cocuy area in northern Colombia at around 3600m. Arising from a congested clump of tuberous roots, from which arose slender twinning stems to 3-4m long, with narrowly ovate to linear alternate leaves. Bearing flowers with yellow-orange exteriors and red spotted yellow interiors, in congested umbels mid summer through autumn for us. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost. We find them to be very successful planted under bushy shrubs, which protect the tubers from penetrating frosts.

Bomarea (Alstroemeriaceae) BSWJ10681

setacea

From a seed collection we gathered from Termales del Ruiz Colombia in 2004, at cold 3600m where this species thrived. Thrusting strong twinning herbaceous stems clothed in narrow foliage to 2m, clothing the smaller shrubs at the side of the trail with umbels of lightly spotted orange funnel-shaped flowers. Best grown in a rich well draining soil with shade for the roots and protection from severe frost.

Boquila (Lardizabalaceae)

trifoliolata

Woody-stemmed, Chilean evergreen twining climber with leaves comprising of three leaflets, that are shallowly lobed and thin textured while young, their appearance somewhat dependent on their surroundings. Bearing axillary inflorescences of yellowish-white flowers normally in threes on pendent slender branching stalks, with either male or female flowers on individual plants. Both flowers being superficially similar the females producing small rounded greyish-white fruit/berry if pollinated by male flowers. Although delicate in appearance the plants are considered to be hardy to zone 7 (US), but would recommend a sheltered site in semi-shade in a drained fertile soil that has some moisture retention.

Boykinia (Saxifragaceae)

aconitifolia

Very hardy perennial, growing into weed smothering patches, of palmately lobed shiny leaves. Flowering stems to 60cm, adorning them for most of the summer. Easily grown in a leafy soil in part-full shade.

Boykinia (Saxifragaceae)

occidentalis

From the west Coast of North America, a tough perennial, growing into weed smothering patches, of palmate shiny leaves. Flowering stems to 90cm, adorning them for most of the summer. Easily grown in a leafy soil in part-full shade.

Boykinia (Saxifragaceae)

rotundifolia

Californian perennial, growing into weed smothering patches, of round toothed shiny leaves. With flowering stems to 60cm, adorning them for most of the summer. Easily grown in a leafy soil in part-full shade. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Briggsia (Gesneriaceae) GWJ9342

kurzii

A new unexpectedly hardy perennial species to cultivation, with relatively large softly hairy grey-green corrugated leaves from a shortly creeping rhizome. Bearing sprays of fox-glove sized tubular pale yellow flowers, with red spotted interiors, in the summer months. Our collection from seed gathered in the cold Lachung Valley in eastern Sikkim in 2002 at 2800m. Best grown in full to part shade in a well drained soil that has plenty of humus to retain moisture. Syn. Loxostigma.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ10433

aff. cordata

From a seed collection gathered from the high altitude plateau of Sierra de los Cuchumatanes in Guatemala at an elevation of 3300 m in 2004. Where it formed variable, but densely branched small trees to around 4 m tall with white twigs bearing large narrowly elliptical leaves to 20 cm long, dark glossy green above, white below. With sizeable terminal pyramidal panicles of small ball-like clusters of orange to yellow flowers. Best grown in full sun and a well drained site.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ11478

aff. lindleyana

From one of our seed collections gathered on the island of Yakushima south of the largest islands of Japan in 2006. Where this species grew at the edge of dense forest, with a robust arching habit bearing long leathery elliptic leaves and terminal long arching spikes of small tubular flowers. Best grown in full sun with some protection from freezing winds.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ11278

asiatica

The most robust form we have encountered so far, of this evergreen shrub with a wide distribution throughout Asia. Forming a small tree or open shrub with slender growth in the wild, but easily maintained to 2m in cultivation. Bearing 25cm long drooping spikes of fragrant white flowers Nov-April. Requires full sun and a well drained frost-free site or conservatory. Our collection from the unpredictable volcano Gunung Papandayan, western Java Indonesia in 2005.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) WJC13823a

colvilei

A collection from our hike on the north-east Himalayas in 2013 at 2950m. Where this collection was gathered from a wide thicket of the species, which was displaying a few late spikes of flowers. A stunning species when seen in its glory, which can reach small tree-like proportions in a relatively short time. Possessing corky branches of semi-evergreen lance-shaped grey-green foliage, bearing glorious terminal pendant panicles of individually large red foxglove-like flowers for weeks on end late spring-early summer. Easily grown in full sun and well drained soil, protect from cold while young.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ2121

colvilei

Gathered on our first expedition to northern India in 1994, from the Singalila Ridge at 2950m, where it grew on an exposed steep south facing hillside. Soon settling down in our garden where it has formed a large multi-stemmed shrub 5m tall by 3-4m wide, with corky branches of semi-evergreen broadly lance-shaped grey-green foliage, bearing glorious terminal pendant panicles of individually large red foxglove-like flowers for weeks on end late spring-early summer. Easily grown in full sun in a well drained soil with some moisture retention, protect from cold while young.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) GWJ9399

colvilei

From our highest collection made on the Singalila Ridge North India at 3275m. A stunning species when seen in its glory, which can reach small tree-like proportions in a relatively short time. Possessing corky branches of semi-evergreen lance-shaped grey-green foliage, bearing glorious terminal pendant panicles of individually large red foxglove-like flowers for weeks on end late spring-early summer. Easily grown in full sun and well drained soil, protect from cold while young.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) GWJ9384a

colvilei

A stunning species when seen in its glory, which can reach small tree-like proportions in a relatively short time. Possessing corky branches of semi-evergreen lance-shaped grey-green foliage, bearing glorious terminal pendant panicles of individually large red foxglove-like flowers for weeks on end late spring-early summer. Easily grown in full sun and well drained soil, protect from cold while young. From our collection made on the Singalila Ridge North India at 3050m.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) GWJ9384b

colvilei

From our collection made on the Singalila Ridge North India at 2900m. A stunning species when seen in its glory, which can reach small tree-like proportions in a relatively short time. Possessing corky branches of semi-evergreen lance-shaped grey-green foliage, bearing glorious terminal pendant panicles of individually large red foxglove-like flowers for weeks on end late spring-early summer. Easily grown in full sun and well drained soil, protect from cold while young.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) WJC13760

colvilei

Originating from one of our seeds collection made in the Lachen Valley of northern Sikkim in 2013 at 3000m. Where this collection was gathered from a wide spreading individual with darker red flowers held in large terminal inflorescences. A stunning species when seen in its glory, which can reach small tree-like proportions in a relatively short time. Possessing corky branches of semi-evergreen lance-shaped grey-green foliage, bearing glorious terminal pendant panicles of individually large red foxglove-like flowers for weeks on end late spring-early summer. Easily grown in full sun and well drained soil, protect from cold while young.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae)

colvilei 'Kewensis'

A selected form of this often tree-like semi-evergreen shrub. Large, white-centred, rich red flowers are borne in drooping racemes amid dark green foliage May-July. Requires full sun and well drained soil. Height 4m. Spread 3m. Protect when young.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ6036

curviflora f. venenifera

Syn. venenifera. A medium sized woolly arching shrub, bearing July-November, drooping, densely many-flowered one-sided terminal panicles, 10-30cm long of bright-purple bowed flowers. Full sun and well drained soil. From seed we collected on the remote island of Yakushima, Japan.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BWJ8083

davidii

From seed of one of my collections on Emei Shan, Sichuan China. From a strongly arching shrub to 2m tall, growing in a forest clearing, with very grey fuzzy foliage and exceptionally long terminal spikes of lilac flowers. Best grown in full sun and well drained soil.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae)

delavayi (heliophylla)

A little known vigorous deciduous shrub. One of our favourite species. Leaves and stems are woolly. Plumes of fragrant, pinkish-lilac orange eyed flowers from May-July. Full sun and well drained soil. Height 4m spread 3m.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BWJ7803

fallowiana

A fairly restrained semi-evergreen shrub, with stems and undersides of the narrow leaves covered in a white woolly indumentum. Bearing terminal and axillary sequential plumes of fragrant, pale purple orange eyed flowers from mid-summer, persisting far longer than B. davidii. Best grown in full sun and in a well drained soil. From seed I collected on an open pain close to Lijiang China. Height & spread 3m.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BWJ8020

forrestii

My own collection of this little known or grown species which we have found to be very variable. Originating from seed I collected on Longzhoushan, Sichuan China in the autumn of 2000 at 3050m, which explains the hardiness of this collection. In this form the panicles are much longer only lilac tinted in bud opening to flared white yellow centred flowers in summer. Forming a large arching shrub if left un-pruned, with dark grey-green leaves pubescent beneath. Easily grown in most situations in full sun or part shade in a well drained soil with some moisture retention, protect from severe cold while young.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) KR2737

forrestii

A little known or grown species which we have found to be very variable. This form is what is regarded as the normal lilac flowering form with dark grey-green leaves pubescent beneath and pendant racemes of fragrant, purple-pale lilac yellow centred flowers over most of the summer months for us. Best grown in a warm situation in full sun in a well drained soil with some moisture retention, protect from cold while young.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ8912

japonica

Our collection of this medium sized arching shrub, with four winged shoots and stems with long pointed leaves which are pale below. Bearing long drooping dense terminal panicles of elongated pale purple flowers darker inside than out, July-October. One of our collections made from a forest high in the mountains of the Kii Peninsular. Best in full sun and well drained soil.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) HWJ602

macrostachya

A new species to us that we collected at 2240m on Fan Xi Pan, N. Vietnam. A semi-evergreen shrub to 2m, flowering on the new wood. With angled stems bearing softly white hairy lanceolate-ovate leaves. Inflorescence terminal upright sturdy spike of pink flowers. Requires full sun and a well drained site.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) WWJ12016

macrostachya

From a distinct seed collection gathered with Peter Wharton (which the best form will be named for) on the Chinese border in the very north of Vietnam in the soggy autumn of 2007. Distinct in being a bright purple flowering form of this upright semi-evergreen shrubby species to 2m tall, flowering on the new wood. With angled white stems bearing softly white hairy lanceolate-ovate leaves and sturdy terminal upright spiked inflorescences late summer through winter. Requires full sun and a well drained site, sheltered from the coldest winds.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ9106

megalocephala

A new species to cultivation that we collected up above the clouds on the extinct Volcán Zunil, Quetzaltenango Guatemala at 3350m. Where it formed small and gnarled villous trees 2-5m tall at this heady altitude, with distinct slender white-woolly foliage and emerging terminal inflorescences of yellow? ball-like flowers, similar to B. globosa. Best grown in full sun and a well drained site.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ2679

nivea from sikkim

From outside its normal distribution in the wild, one of our collections from N.E. Sikkim. Of this semi-evergreen shrub with large long terminal and axillary clusters of cylindrical purple flowers, amid broadly lanceolate and densely felted grey foliage. Requires full sun and a well drained site.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BWJ8146

nivea v. yunnanensis

Semi-evergreen shrub covered in all its parts in white woolly hairs, highly valued for its large long terminal and axillary spikes of cylindrical purple fragrant flowers. Along with its ornamental broadly lanceolate and densely felted grey-white foliage, which are made larger if the entire shrub is heavily pruned in spring. From one of my own collections made in the Baoxing area of Sichuan, China. Best grown in full sun in a well drained site. To 3m tall.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) GWJ9286

paniculata from Sikkim

Described in my notes as been common in the area we collected the seed of this wonderfully white woolly species deep in the Lachen Valley in northern Sikkim on our way back from the Chinese border in 2002. Yet rare and unfamiliar in cultivation. In the wild it formed large much branched shrubs with silvery long pointed ovate foliage held on rounded white stems. With long paniculate inflorescences held terminally and in the apical axils, which had held the long tubed white-yellow flowers widely flared at their throats which are a deep yellow-orange on their interiors. Forming a small to medium sized shrub for us preferring full sun in a freely drained soil with some moisture retention.

Buddleja (Buddlejaceae) BSWJ895

venenifera f. calvescens

A medium sized arching shrub, bearing July-November, drooping, densely many-flowered one-sided terminal panicles, 10-30cm long of lavender flowers. Full sun and well drained soil. From seed we collected in Ch'õllip'o Arboretum.

Bupleurum (Apiaceae)

fruticosum

From seed we collected from a large colony at Sandakphu, Northern India at 3630m. A clump forming slender species with decidedly erect branching stems to 1m tall with stem clasping fine-pointed oblong glaucous-green leaves. Bearing terminal bracted yellow flowers in compound umbels subtended by ovate leaf-like bracts June-August, followed by elliptic persistent fruit. This represents our collection from the Lachen Valley, Sikkim at 3100m.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ12574

auriculata v. kamtschatica

A collection gathered from deep in the forest within the Odaesan area of South Korea, collected in the autumn of 2010, growing by a moist ditch. Where it had formed a small colony of 1m tall stems which were shortly branched in their upper parts. While the foliage was an unusual hastate-shape 20cm across, with long tips to the five shallowly winged petioles held on winged petioles. With a sizeable terminal panicles of racemes of white tubular-shaped ray flowers. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11544

delphiniifolia

From one of our seed collections gathered from Mt Kamegamori, Shikoku, Japan in 2006. Where this unusual woodland species grew in very dense shade on ground that is moist in spring with flower spikes to 1m tall. A member of the daisy family that is grown primarily for its dramatic palmate 7-cleft, irregularly incised and toothed leaves, an intriguing subject for the shade garden. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11553

delphiniifolia

An unusual member of the daisy family, forming an intriguing subject for the shade garden. Where it is grown primarily for its dramatic palmate 7-cleft, irregularly incised and toothed leaves. This is a species we found seed of in the high mountain forest of Mt Kamegamori, Shikoku, Japan in 2006. Where it is to be found on ground that is moist in spring with flower spikes to 1m. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11117

delphiniifolia

From one of our seed collections gathered from Mt Soburiyama on Kyushu, Japan in 2005. Where this unusual woodland species grew in very dense shade on ground that is moist in spring with flower spikes to 1m tall. A member of the daisy family that is grown primarily for its dramatic palmate 7-cleft, irregularly incised and toothed leaves, an intriguing subject for the shade garden. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11189

delphiniifolia

An unusual member of the daisy family, forming an intriguing subject for the shade garden. Where it is grown primarily for its dramatic palmate 7-cleft, irregularly incised and toothed leaves. This is a species we found seed of in high mountain forests of Shizuoka Japan in 2005. Where it is to be found on ground that is moist in spring with flower spikes to 1m. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ12849

farfarifolia

An unusual woodland species, with several irregularly toothed and deeply lobed leaves, which are cobwebby below as are the juvenile branched stems to 1m tall. With a sizeable acutely branched terminal panicle of white to yellow tubular-shaped ray flowers. From one of our seed collections gathered from Mt Iwaguro Yama, Shikoku, Japan in 2006. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11549

farfarifolia v. acerina

A potentially taller unusual woodland species, with several coarsely toothed and lobed arrow shaped leaves, which are cobwebby below as are the juvenile branched stems to 1m tall. With a sizeable acutely branched terminal panicle of white to yellow tubular-shaped ray flowers. From one of our seed collections gathered from Mt Kamegamori, Shikoku, Japan in 2006. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11554

farfarifolia v. acerina

From one of our seed collections gathered from Mt Kamegamori, Shikoku, Japan in 2006. A taller unusual woodland species, with several irregularly toothed and variably lobed leaves, which are cobwebby below as are the juvenile branched stems to 1m tall. With a sizeable acutely branched terminal panicle of white to yellow tubular-shaped ray flowers. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11550

farfarifolia v. acerina

A potentially taller unusual woodland species, with several coarsely toothed and lobed heart shaped leaves, which are cobwebby below as are the juvenile branched stems to 1m tall. With a sizeable acutely branched terminal panicle of white to yellow tubular-shaped ray flowers. From one of our seed collections gathered from Mt Kamegamori, Shikoku, Japan in 2006. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae)

farfarifolia var. bulbifera

An unusual member of the daisy family found in the high mountain forests of northern Japan, forming an intriguing subject for the shade garden. Where it is grown primarily for its dramatic large cordate irregularly incised and toothed leaves to 20cm across, densely long-cobwebby below with small bulbils in the axils. Where it is to be found on ground that is moist in spring with cobwebby stems to 1.4m tall bearing long panicles of pendant yellow-white tubular ray-flowers August-October. Best grown in cool part-full shade in any well drained soil that can retain some moisture.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11468

maximowicziana see Parasenecio

A delicate looking variety of this unusual woodland species, which we found in a forest clearing on Mt Kirishimayama on the island of Kyushu in southern Japan in the autumn of 2006. Where it only formed tiny plants in the starved conditions, with very distinct hastate (arrow-shaped) to deltoid (triangular as in delta) leaves irregularly long lobed and/or sharply long toothed, that would normally be 15 cm across. Bearing a terminal loose panicle of tubby funnel-shaped white ray flowers, to 70cm tall in gardens, August-October. Best grown in a well drained fertile soil with some moisture retention in either part or full shade. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11167

tebakoensis

From one of our seed collections which we gathered on the high mountains of Ehime northern Shikoku in 2005. A stoloniferous species with slender dark stems 25-85 cm tall, forming small colonies in rocky soils in the cool alpine forests. With ornamental palmate 5-7 deeply cleft, irregularly incised and toothed leaves to 17 cm wide. Bearing slender terminal panicles of snow-white flowers August-October. Best grown in a cool well drained fertile soil with some moisture retention in either part or full shade. Syn. Parasenecio.

Cacalia (Asteraceae) BSWJ11536

tebakoensis

A stoloniferous species with slender stems 25-85 cm tall , which we collected seed of on the high mountains of northern Shikoku where it formed small colonies in the rocky soil of the alpine forests. With ornamental palmate 5-7 deeply cleft, irregularly incised and toothed leaves to 17 cm wide. Bearing slender terminal panicles of white flowers August-October. Best grown in a well drained fertile soil with some moisture retention in either part or full shade. Syn. Parasenecio.

Calceolaria (Scrophulariaceae) BSWJ10638

perfoliata

An unusual climbing slipper flower which we collected seed of at 3550m high in the mountains of Colombia in 2004. Where this semi-evergreen pushed its way through the branches of surrounding shrubs for support (scandent). Bearing perfoliate leaves (opposite pairs with the stem appearing to grow through them) and terminal diffuse inflorescences of pale yellow slipper flowers. Best grown in a fertile drained soil in a sheltered site.

Callicarpa (Verbenaceae) BSWJ7127

aff. tikusikensis

From our own seed collection made in the north of the island of Taiwan in 1999. Where it formed an impressive arching deciduous shrub to 3m tall, bearing elliptic serrated leaves to 15 cm long covered in golden stellate hairs, on yellow hairy branchlets. With dense axillary cymes of deep purple orbicular fruit born in late summer-autumn. Best given a site out of freezing winds in a sunny well drained situation.

Callicarpa (Verbenaceae) BSWJ12621

japonica

From one of our seed collections gathered in the cold Waraksan area in the centre of South Korea in 2010. Where it formed a conspicuous relatively small shrub to 1.5m tall (shorter in gardens), with slender branches of opposite small soft green oval leaves starting to turn to their wonderful autumnal colour. With large congested clusters of individually small violet-purple glossy fruit held in most of its leaf axils, succeeding the pale pink flowers. Easily grown in full sun or a partly shaded site where the soil is freely drained.

Callicarpa (Verbenaceae) BSWJ8521

japonica v. luxurians

A conspicuous relatively small shrub to 2m tall (shorter in gardens), with slender branches of medium sized soft green oval leaves. Which turn to a wonderful colour in autumn, contrasting with the large clusters of small violet-purple glossy fruit held in most of its leaf axils, succeeding the pale pink flowers. Easily grown in full sun or a partly shaded site where the soil is freely drained. From our own seed collection made in the remote island of Ullüngdõ.

Camellia (Theaceae) WWJ11925

pitardii

Originating from my sortie to Y Tý in the very north of Vietnam along the border with China in 2007, with the late Peter Wharton. Where we endured an entire week of heavy rain living in our tents. Here we re-discovered an isolated tree of this species growing in an open overgrazed area, 4-5m tall. With large dark evergreen ovate-elliptic leathery leaves finely serrated with long tips, on short gnarled purplish branches in the exposed position and very large grapefruit-sized orbicular multi seeded tri-locular fruit. The result of the large terracotta-pink flowers born in March-May. Best grown with a bit of shelter from freezing winds and extreme cold, in a moisture retentive drained fertile soil.

Camellia (Theaceae) HWJ1037

pitardii

From my very first sortie to Y Tý in the very north of Vietnam along the border with China in 2003. Where I discovered a highly degraded forest in the low cloud, with an isolated tree of this species growing in an open overgrazed area, 4-5m tall. With small dark evergreen ovate-elliptic leathery leaves 6-10× 2.5-3.5cm finely serrated with long tips, on short gnarled purplish branches in the exposed position and large apple-sized orbicular fruit. The result of the large terracotta-pink flowers born in April-May, we subsequently saw on cultivation, both flower and fruit on the largest end of the recorded dimensions of 10 and 8cm across. Best grown with a bit of shelter from freezing winds and extreme cold, in a moisture retentive drained fertile soil. These are 30 lt pots.

Campanula (Campanulaceae)

'Sarastro'

An impressive introduction from Austria, given to us by the nursery of the same name. Bearing almost embarrassingly large midnight blue pendant narrow bells, on upright stems to 40cm. Soon forming sizeable colonies from its spreading roots. Easily cultivated in any good soil best in full sun to part shade.

Campanula (Campanulaceae) DHTU0126

alliariifolia

A collected form of this species collected by Dan Hinkley in Turkey in 2000. A very hardy perennial with several simple or branched flowering stems to 70cm tall bearing long white bell shaped blooms from June to September. Spread 60cm. Easily grown in a moist soil in sun or shade, even better mixed in with shrubs.

Campanula (Campanulaceae) BSWJ7436

punctata

A selected form from cultivation in Japan which we bought in 2000, selected for its purple flushed foliage. Arising from creeping underground slender rhizomes, with bristly stems to 80cm tall, with ovate irregularly toothed leaves 5cm long flushed purple above darker below. With long bell shaped white flushed purple flowers borne in June. Spread 40cm. Easily grown in good light or part shade in a drained fertile soil.

Campanula (Campanulaceae) BSWJ5553

punctata v. microdonta

Our collection of this hardy perennial, from a forest edge in the high mountains of the Kinki area of Japan. From creeping underground rhizomes, long creamy-white bell-shaped blooms are borne on stems to 90cm high in July-Aug. Spread 50cm. For a humusy soil in sun or partially shaded site.

Campanula (Campanulaceae) BSWJ8499

takesimana

A hardy perennial bellflower species that we collected seed of on the remote island of Ullüngdõ South Korea one of the few place it occurs in South Korea. Which forms creeping underground rhizomes with cordate serrated glossy-green basal leaves below the arching stems to 60cm tall with alternating terminal branches of pendant long spotted white bell-shaped blooms from July-August. Spread 50cm. Easily grown in a humusy soil in full sun or in a partially shaded site.

Capparis (Capparaceae) BSWJ13626

spinosa v. inermis

Bit of a digression for us, but could not resist having a go with this seed liberated from the walls of The Lucca Botanic Gardens, who invite us to participate in their flower show every September. Known for their capers, this shrub originating from dry areas of the eastern Mediterranean, growing from a small woody base with annual stems equating to given conditions. Bearing alternate paddle-shaped leaves with large white axillary flowers with a boss of long purple stamen. Best grown in full sun in a very well drained soil, the mother plants were growing in an old brick wall.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

bulbifera

Perennial spreading by fleshy, rootstocks and bulbils from its leaf axils. Producing clusters of pale purple flowers April-June. Height 30-60cm. Spread 45-60cm Requires partial shade and moist soil.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

californica

Upright perennial spreading by fleshy rootstocks. Produces clusters of, white-pale pink flowers in early spring. Height 10-40cm. Spread 30-40cm. For a moist leafy soil in deciduous shade, well drained in winter. N.America.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

diphylla

Perennial spreading by fleshy rhizomes, with upright stems to 35cm. Produces clusters of, white flowers above the whorl of three leaflets April-May. For a moist leafy soil in deciduous shade. Native of Eastern N.America.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

diphylla 'Eco Cut Leaf'

A fine introduction from a selection made by the North American plantsman Don Jacobs of an easily cultivated perennial spreading by fleshy rhizomes. With trifoliate deeply serrated and decoratively marked leaves, in this form, held close to the ground. Producing upright stems to 35cm bearing clusters of, white flowers April-May. For a moist leafy soil in deciduous shade. Native of Eastern N. America.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

diphylla 'Eco Moonlight'

Another introduction from a selection made by the North American plantsman Don Jacobs of an easily cultivated perennial spreading by fleshy rhizomes. With opposite pairs of dark green trifoliate leaves with the veins decoratively marked in white, in this form, held close to the ground. Producing upright stems to 45cm bearing clusters of, white flowers April-May. For a moist leafy soil in deciduous shade. Native of Eastern N. America.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

glanduligera

Upright perennial forming large colonies in time, spreading by fleshy horizontal rhizomes. Thrusting upright stems in early spring which produces clusters of bright purple flowers Height 30-60cm. Spread 45-60cm, requires partial shade and moist soil.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae) HH

heptaphylla

A selected form of this woodland species which arises from swollen scaly rhizomes. Forming slowly spreading colonies in its native mountainous forests of south-western Europe, spreading as far north as Germany. Where the pinnate leaves emerge with clusters of large white flowers April-May, on stems to 20-30cm. Spread 45-60cm. Easily grown in full to part shade, in a drained soil that can retain some moisture during its growing season. Liable to go dormant early if warm and dry. A selection given to us from the renowned plantsman the late Harry Hay's garden.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

kitaibelii

Perennial spreading by scaly, swollen rhizomes. Leaves bronze, on emerging with clusters of large white-pale yellow flowers in spring, on stems to 20-30cm. Spread 45-60cm. Requires partial shade and moist soil.A selection given to us from the renowned plantsman the late Harry Hay's garden.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

laciniata

After many years of building up stock, a slowly spreading perennial from short swollen creeping rhizomes. With deeply cut leaves to thread-like appearance on slender stems to 10-15cm with pale purple-to white flowers emerging in spring. Spread 45-60cm in time. Easily grown in partial to full shade in any type of fertile well drained but moisture retentive soil. Sorry no photo of the leaves just yet.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

macrophylla

Upright Himalayan perennial spreading by thin fleshy creeping rhizomes. Producing clusters of large pink flowers in April-June, height 30-70cm. Spread 45-60cm. Requires partial shade and a moist leafy soil.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae) BSWJ2165a

macrophylla 'Bright and Bronzy'

Himalayan perennial spreading slowly by thin fleshy creeping rhizomes, which produces robustly upright stems to a height of 50-90cm. With bronze tinted pinnately composed leaves below the showy clusters of large pink flowers April-June. Spread 45-60cm. Easily grown in full sun or partial shade when provided with adequate moisture in a leafy soil. Our collection from The Singalila Ridge Northern India.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

maxima

A new hybrid for us, given to us by Dan Hinkley of Heronswood USA. Which is a lovely large-flowered perennial, from a creeping rhizomatous root, with bold tri-foliate leaves similar to C. diphylla. Bearing large clear white flowers on 20cm stems in spring, but falling dormant if conditions are too dry during the summer months. Best grown in a moist leafy soil in deciduous shade with good drainage for winter.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

pentaphylla

Upright European perennial originating from mountainous forests and shaded slopes of the Pyrenees to southern Germany, Austria and Croatia. Spreading by fleshy, horizontal scaly rhizomes, which produce clusters of large pink flowers in May to June on leafy stems 30-60 cm tall. Spread 45-60 cm. Easily grown in partial shade and moisture retentive fertile soil.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

quinquifolia

Perennial spreading by scaly, swollen rhizomes. Leaves rounded with clusters of bright pink flowers held above them in spring, on stems to 20-30cm. Spread 45-60cm. Requires partial shade and moist soil.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

trifolia

Evergreen perennial species originating from Central European damp woodlands. Emerging from creeping rhizomes with short stems clothed in 3-parted evergreen leaves, forming an ideal gentle ground cover. Topped April to June by slender inflorescences of white open cup-shaped flowers in loose heads. Height 10-15cm. Easily grown in partial or full shade given a bit of moisture in the soil, although quite drought tolerant for moderate periods.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae)

waldsteinii

From N.Yugoslavia a perennial spreading by scaly swollen rhizomes. Clusters of large flared white flowers are accentuated by violet anthers, in early spring, on stems to 15cm. Spread 45-60cm. Requires partial shade and moist soil.

Cardamine (Brassicaceae) BSWJ4659

yezoensis

Our collection from DMZ, S. Korea. Perennial spreading by scaly, swollen rhizomes. Leaves pinnate with clusters of white flowers held above them in spring and summer, on stems to 15-25cm. Spread 45-60cm. Requires partial shade and moist soil.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ6354

alternifolia

Choice clump-forming perennial that we collected seed of from the mountains of Honshu, Japan. An herbaceous Hydrangea look-alike, forming hairy stems to 70cm with oblong toothed leaves. Bearing July-Sept. terminal lace-cap corymbs of white ageing to pale pink flowers. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5719

alternifolia

Choice clump-forming perennial that we collected seed of from the mountains of Shikoku, Japan. An herbaceous Hydrangea look-alike, forming hairy stems to 70cm with oblong toothed leaves. Bearing August-Sept. terminal lace-cap corymbs of pale pink flowers. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5845

alternifolia

Choice clump-forming perennial that we collected seed of from the mountains of Central Kyushu, Japan. An herbaceous Hydrangea look-alike, forming hairy stems to 70cm with oblong toothed leaves. Bearing July-Sept. terminal lace-cap corymbs of coral pink flowers. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ6260

alternifolia

One of our collections from Mt. Unzen in the north of Kyushu Japan, of this choice clump-forming perennial. An herbaceous Hydrangea look-alike, forming hairy stems to 70cm with oblong toothed leaves. Bearing July-September terminal lace-cap corymbs of coral pink flowers. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5734

alternifolia

Choice clump-forming perennial that we collected seed of from the mountains of Shikoku, Japan. An herbaceous Hydrangea look-alike, forming hairy stems to 70cm with oblong toothed leaves. Bearing August-Sept. terminal lace-cap corymbs of pale pink flowers. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ6177

alternifolia

Choice clump-forming perennial that we collected seed of from the mountains of Central Kyushu, Japan. An herbaceous Hydrangea look-alike, forming hairy stems to 70cm with oblong toothed leaves. Bearing July-Sept. terminal lace-cap corymbs of coral pink flowers. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ2803

alternifolia 'Pink Geisha'

This is a plant originating from a collection I made on my first trip to Japan in 1995 and gathered from Mt. Kiyosumi on the Chiba Peninsular. It is a much stronger growing form than the norm with dark upright stems, terminating in larger than normal cymes of pale pink, again larger than normal flowers July-September. An herbaceous Hydrangea look-alike, forming bristly stems to 1m with oblong toothed leaves. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae)

amamioshimensis

From cultivation in Japan an unusual herbaceous member of the Hydrangea family which is reputedly from the Ryukyu Islands. Forming slowly expanding clumps of upright bristly branching stems to 80 cm tall, with ovate toothed leaves. Bearing July-September terminal panicles of pale pink all fertile flowers with contrasting blue stamen. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ2005

formosana

A plant that we have gone to considerable lengths to collect. Choice clump-forming perennial for a moist shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind. Elongated hairy leaves set-off the pale purple lace-cap flowers, on erect stems to 80cm. Taiwan. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ3615

formosana 'Fenghuangshan'

Superficially appearing similar to a hydrangea with upwardly inclined branched stems with serrated leaves, terminating in large cymes of pink-purple flowers, the sterile florets the largest of any collection in this form, from late summer until Christmas or heavy frosts. A strange herbaceous perennial that took a considerable time and effort to find in the only foothold left in the wild, which is in an earthquake torn area of the Central Mountains of Taiwan. Resulting in us being able to offer plants back after the 1999 devastating earthquake obliterated 75% of the plants left in the wild. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ3618

formosana 'Hsitou Splendour'

A plant that we have gone to considerable lengths to collect. Choice clump-forming perennial for a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind. Elongated hairy leaves set-off the purple lace-cap flowers. Taiwan.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ7022

formosana 'Hsitou'

A plant that we have gone to considerable lengths to collect from an area devastated by earth-quakes in Central Taiwan in 1999. Choice clump-forming perennial for a shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind. Elongated hairy leaves set-off the purple lace-cap flowers with larger than normal sterile florets in this clone.

Cardiandra (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ3632

formosana ‘Crûg’s Abundant’

Originating from a plant of this herbaceous perennial which is an herbaceous Hydrangea look-alike. That we collected from the only known surviving population in Central Taiwan in 1996, which we have bulked-up over the years by division. This cultivar was selected for its larger than normal sterile pinkish florets subtending the violet fertile flowers on reddish stalks. For a cool shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from wind.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) BSWJ5404

cordatum

One of our Japanese seed collections from a tall plant which grew in the high mountains of the Kii Peninsular, collected in 1998. A rare species to cultivation, taking up to 9 years to flower from seed, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation, as each bulb dies after flowering. With large glossy cordate basal leaves, below the scented squarish white trumpet lilies, held on upright stems to 2m tall. Best in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich, well drained soil. Easier to cultivate in warmer climate than C. gigantea.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) BSWJ11069

cordatum

From seed we collected in the autumn of 2005 from the mountainous forests of Hiroshima, Japan. Where this unusual form had borne a bountiful display of flowers on tall stems over 3m tall in the moist coniferous forest. A rare species to cultivation, taking 9 years or more to flower from seed, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation, as each bulb dies after flowering. With large glossy cordate basal leaves, below the scented squarish white trumpet lilies, held on upright stems 1 to 2m tall. Best in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich, well drained soil. Easier to cultivate in warmer drier climates than C. gigantea.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) BSWJ4987

cordatum

From one of many of our seed collections gathered in 1998 in the high Japanese mountain forests of the Kii Peninsular. A rare species in cultivation, taking 7 to 9 years to flower from seed, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation, as each bulb dies after flowering. With large glossy cordate basal leaves, below the scented squarish white trumpet lilies, held on upright stems 1 to 2m tall. Best in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich, well drained soil. Easier to cultivate in warmer drier climates than C. gigantea.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) BSWJ8888

cordatum

From one of our Japanese seed collections gathered in 2001 from northern Kyushu, on a visit to see the late Baba San. A rare species to cultivation, taking up to 9 years to flower from seed, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation, as each bulb dies after flowering. With large glossy cordate basal leaves, below the scented squarish white trumpet lilies, held on upright stems 1 to 2m tall. Best in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich, well drained soil. Easier to cultivate in warmer drier climates than C. gigantea.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) BSWJ10843

cordatum v. glehnii

From one of our Japanese seed collection gathered in northern most Honshu near Lake Tawada in the autumn of 2005. A rare species to cultivation, taking 9 years or more to flower, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation over successive years, as each bulb dies after flowering. Forming a lavish clump of glossy cordate basal leaves, eventually thrusting upright stems 1 to 2m tall bearing a terminal well-spaced spike of heavily scented squarish purple spotted white long trumpet lilies June to August. Best grown in part shade in an acid-neutral humus rich well drained and well fed soil. Easier to cultivate in warmer drier climates than C. gigantea.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) BSWJ10827

cordatum v. glehnii

One of our Japanese collections, gathered in the autumn of 2005 from the forests of Mt. Shibamori in northern Honshu. A rare species to cultivation, taking 9 years or more to flower, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation over successive years, as each bulb dies after flowering. Forming a lavish clump of glossy cordate basal leaves, eventually thrusting upright stems 1 to 2m tall bearing a terminal well-spaced spike of heavily scented squarish purple spotted white long trumpet lilies June to August. Best grown in part shade in an acid-neutral humus rich well drained and well fed soil. Easier to cultivate in warmer drier climates than C. gigantea.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) BSWJ4722

cordatum v. glehnii

Our Japanese collection from northern Honshu in 1997, a rare species to cultivation, taking 7-9 years to start flowering from seed. Meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation, as each bulb dies after flowering. With cordate basal leaves, below the scented squarish creamy-white trumpet lilies, on stems 1-2m tall. Best in full to part shade, acid, humus rich, well drained soil.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae)

giganteum

One the most spectacular members of the Lily family. Clump forming bulbs taking as long as 7 years to flower, Meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation, as each bulb dies after flowering on stems 2-4m, large highly fragrant white trumpets. Best in full to part shade, acid, humus rich, well drained soil.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) GWJ9219

giganteum

Our seed collection from the Lachen valley, Sikkim in 2002, of this, impressive lily taking as long as 7 years to flower from seed. Meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation as each bulb dies after flowering on stems 2-4m tall, bearing large highly fragrant white trumpets in terminal spikes. Best grown in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich well drained soil.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) HWJK2158

giganteum

A seed collection from a ledge overhanging the Arun River on the border between Eastern Nepal and Tibet, in 2002, of this, impressive lily taking as long as 7 years to flower from seed. Meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation as each bulb dies after flowering on stems 2-4m tall, bearing large highly fragrant white trumpets in terminal spikes. Best grown in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich well drained soil.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) HWJK2386

giganteum

From a seed collection we made with Dan Hinkley in the Mewa Khola Eastern Nepal, in 2002, of this impressive lily taking as long as 7 years to flower from seed. Meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation as each bulb dies after flowering on stems 2-4m tall, bearing large highly fragrant white trumpets in terminal spikes. Best grown in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich well drained soil.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) WJC13698

giganteum

From seed we collected from a concealed side valley in eastern Himalayas, which is always very wet and boggy. Hence the old flowering stems we collected this seed from were growing on a steep bank in the shade of a tall cliff. Taking as long as 7 or 8 years to flower from seed, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation as each bulb dies after flowering on stems 2-4m tall, bearing large highly fragrant white trumpets in terminal spikes. Best grown in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich well drained soil. Some recommend a full barrow of well rotted manure to enrich the soil below each bulb, while letting the neck of the bulb to protrude out of the soil, but covering with dry leaves etc. in cold weather.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) WJC13661

giganteum

An impressive lily to over 3m tall that we found seed of in the eastern Himalayas in the autumn of 2013 at 2900m. Taking as long as 7 or 8 years to flower from seed, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation as each bulb dies after flowering on stems 2-4m tall, bearing large highly fragrant white trumpets in terminal spikes. Best grown in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich well drained soil. Some recommend a full barrow of well rotted manure to enrich the soil below each bulb, while letting the neck of the bulb to protrude out of the soil, but covering with dry leaves etc. in cold weather.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae) BWJ8180

giganteum v. yunnanense

One of the most luxurious forms of the genus, which I collected the seed of in the company of Dan Hinkley in the mountains above Baoxing (China) in the autumn of 2000. Taking 7-9 years to flower from seed, meanwhile forming a clump of off-set bulbs, which give a continuation as each bulb dies after flowering. With large luxurious basal leaves which are heavily bronzed, below the highly scented creamy-white purple throated trumpet lilies, on stems 1.5-4m depending on how rich a condition it can be availed. Best in full to part shade in an acidic humus rich moisture retentive, but well drained soil.

Cardiocrinum (Liliaceae)

giganteum v. yunnanense

Seed raised plants of a one of the most spectacular members of the lily family. Because they are seed raised and not divided from clumps they eventually form small colonies of sturdy monocarpic (die after flowering) bulbs, which flower in successive seasons. Taking as long as 7 years to flower (from seed), on stems 2-4m tall, bearing large highly fragrant cream striped purple trumpets. Best grown in part shade in an acid-neutral humus rich well drained and well fed rich soil.

Carex (Cyperaceae) KWJ12304

scaposa

An exceptionally ornamental sedge originating from one of my collections on that beloved mountain that I keep on wittering on about, Fansipan in the very north of Vietnam. For us it has formed tight tussocks, 40-50cm tall of broad (probably very for a sedge) at 5cm, pleated or conspicuously veined leaves, spreading to around 60cm (2ft) wide since 2007. Undoubtedly it will be declared as one of the most ornamental of its genus, as not only is the foliage ornamental, but the pink inflorescences which are retained for months are, I suspect as good as it gets. Best grown in a freely drained soil with some moisture retention in either sun or shade.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) BSWJ11072

japonica

An easily grown small ornamental tree which we collected seed of in the mountains of Hiroshima Japan in 2005. With highly ornamental ovate-elongate corrugated/pleated leaves 15 x 2½ cm. Which bare small catkins in spring and result in long dense pendant hop-like catkins of bracty large winged seed to 10cm long. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade. ****************** This plant can be supplied open ground over the winter months, please ask for a price and sizes available.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) BSWJ10803

japonica

An easily grown small ornamental tree which we collected seed of in the mountains of Iwate Japan in 2005. With highly ornamental ovate-elongate corrugated/pleated leaves 15 x 2½ cm. Which bare small catkins in spring and result in long dense pendant hop-like catkins of bracty large winged seed to 10cm long. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) CWJ12449

kawakami

A seed collection gathered with Finlay Colley and Dan Hinkley in 2007, from an ice covered Lishan, where this elegant tree grew on a steep mountainside. Only forming a small tree in gardens although large in the wild, bearing parchment-like slender parallel conspicuously veined doubly serrated leaves to 11 cm long. Which are more persistent than other species, with 6 cm long catkins on long slender stalks in late summer into autumn. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade best sheltered from cold winds.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) CWJ12412

kawakamii

An elegant small tree in gardens although large in the wild, where I collected this seed from in the Long-Jen Valley a restricted area on the east coast of Taiwan, with Finlay Colley in 2007. Bearing parchment-like slender parallel conspicuously veined doubly serrated leaves to 11 cm long. Which are more persistent than other species, with 6 cm long catkins on long slender stalks in late summer into autumn. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade best sheltered from cold winds.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) BSWJ10809

laxiflora

An easily grown medium sized tree which we collected seed of close to the coast of Iwate in northern Japan in 2005. Where the trees possessed a slightly weeping habit, covered with autumnal coloured elliptical shallowly ribbed leaves on slender drooping petioles. Which bore small catkins in spring and were then festooned in the resulting long dangling hop-like clusters of bracty winged seed to 9cm long. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) BSWJ10891

laxiflora

An easily grown medium sized tree which we collected seed of close to the coast of Iwate in northern Japan in 2005. Where the trees possessed a slightly weeping habit, covered with autumnal coloured elliptical shallowly ribbed leaves on slender drooping petioles. Which bore small catkins in spring and were then festooned in the resulting long dangling hop-like clusters of bracty winged seed to 9cm long. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) BSWJ11035

laxiflora

Forming a medium sized tree where we collected seed of this easily grown species from the mountainous area of Fukui south-western Honshu Japan in 2005. Where the trees possessed a slightly weeping habit, covered with autumnal coloured elliptical shallowly ribbed leaves on slender drooping petioles. Which bore small catkins in spring and were then festooned in the resulting long dangling hop-like loose clusters of bracty winged seed to 9cm long. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) BSWJ8772

laxiflora v. longispica

An easily grown medium sized tree which we collected seed of on the island of Cheju way off the coast of South Korea. Where the very old trees of a slightly weeping habit had grown to 10m tall, covered with autumnal coloured elliptical corrugated leaves on slender drooping branches. Which bore small catkins in spring and were then festooned in the resulting long dangling hop-like clusters of bracty winged seed to 9cm long. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) FMWJ13421

pubescence

Originating from one of my seed collections gathered on a very exposed ridge on the edge of a mountain forest overlooking the border into China in the very north of Vietnam in the autumn of 2011. Where it only grew into a small congested tree 3-4m tall, smothered in the elongated parallel-veined leaves 10cm long, which are reputed to emerge a brilliant coppery red (as have the young plants). With generous quantities of long bracty catkins hiding the long winged seed that we eagerly gathered. Best grown in good light to part shade, with shelter from freezing winds in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) RWJ9839

rankanensis

One of the most ornamental species of this already superlative genus for foliage, originating from one of our seed collections gathered in the mountain forests of eastern Taiwan in 2003. Where they can form sizeable trees if given a long time, but only small trees or large shrubs in gardens. With an airy habit of slender angled branches bearing the distinct lanceolate corrugated leaves, which emerge a deep bronze colour only slowly fading through the season while being replaced by younger foliage. In time they will also develop long terminal catkins to further enhance the yellow autumnal leaves. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade.

Carpinus (Corylaceae) BSWJ10800

tschonoskii

An easily grown medium sized tree which we collected seed of from the mountainous area of Iwate in northern Japan in 2005. Where the trees were covered with autumnal coloured elliptical shallowly ribbed leaves on slender drooping petioles. Which bore small catkins in spring and were then festooned in the resulting dangling hop-like loose clusters of bracty winged seed to 8cm long. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or partial shade. ****** ******** ******* Much larger plants also available from open ground/bare tooted during the dormant period (winter) please ask.

Caulokaempferia (Zingiberaceae) BSWJ11818

petelotii

An intriguing small ginger that one cannot help being enamoured by, which we have collected several times from the north of Vietnam in a deep gorge high in the cool mountain forests, where it clings to the almost bare mossy cliffs with its tiny fleshy roots. Where by mid-summer it has slender stems to no more than 10 cm (20 in cultivation) tall with small broadly lanceolate ribbed leaves clasping the stems, which all terminate in a bracty spike, which extrudes broad lipped canary yellow flowers (large for the plant) in succession for many months well into the autumn. We have cultivated this in containers, but should be hardy in sheltered shady conditions in almost neat humus and lack of competition.

Caulokaempferia (Zingiberaceae) HWJ541

petelotii

A charming small ginger we collected way back in 1999 on our first ascent on Fansipan the highest mountain in the north of Vietnam. From a deep gorge high in the cool mountain forests, where it clings to the almost bare mossy cliffs with its tiny fleshy roots. Where by mid-summer it has slender stems to no more than 10 cm (20 in cultivation) tall with small broadly lanceolate ribbed leaves clasping the stems, which all terminate in a bracty spike, which extrudes broad lipped canary yellow flowers (large for the plant) in succession for many months well into the autumn. We have cultivated this in containers, but should be hardy in sheltered shady conditions in almost neat humus and lack of competition.

Caulophyllum (Berberidaceae)

thalictroides ssp. robustum

From dry mountain woods of the Far East, having in time a stout rootstock, forming dense clumps of erect stems to 80cm. The broad spikes of greenish-brown flowers appear April-May, above the dissected broad foliage, followed by glaucous blue berries. Best in a leafy soil in full-part shade.

Cautleya (Zingiberaceae) BSWJ2281

cathcartii 'Tenzing's Gold'

Our collection from N. India. Bulbous perennial, forming clumps of green slender vertical stems, to 55cm. With narrowly lanceolate leaves, purple-red on the undersides of the uppermost. Bearing long spikes (15-20) of red-tinted bracts with protruding orange-yellow flowers. Sun or shade in humus rich well drained soil, protect in cold areas. (We were guided by Sherpa Tenzing's family)

Cautleya (Zingiberaceae) BWJ7843

gracilis

From one of my collections made on the Cangshan in western Yunnan China in 2000. A bulbous perennial, forming clumps of vertical narrow green stems, to 1 m. With lanceolate dark green ribbed leaves, bearing May-Oct. long spikes of red-tinted bracts with protruding primrose-yellow flowers. Sun or shade in humus rich well drained soil, protect in cold areas.

Cautleya (Zingiberaceae) BSWJ7186

gracilis 'Crûg Gold'

A clone that we collected from the forested area close to the summit of Doi Phohon-Pok, a mountain within The Golden Triangle straddling the border between Burma and Thailand. Which forms clumps of vertical slender green stems, to 80cm tall, with oblong-lanceolate leaves. Bearing July-October terminal spikes of up to 10 yellow long lipped flowers on red stained stems protruding from deep red calyces. Easily grown in a humousy soil that is drained, ensuring the rhizomes are deep enough not to be over frozen in winter. Best in light shade.

Cautleya (Zingiberaceae) BSWJ2408

spicata 'Bleddyn's Beacon'

One of the best forms we have grown, outperforming in flower, any of our other collections. Which means the plant's energy is concentrated on flowering rather than increasing at the root, unfortunately meaning it is in short supply. Of a stocky nature with strong dark red stems (hence old species name of C. robustum, not the cultivar) bearing longer than normal terminal inflorescences of dark red overlapping bracts with sizeable protruding yellow flowers over a long period June to October. Easily grown in any type of humus rich but drained soil in sun to light shade, protect the rhizomes from freezing in cold areas, with a mulch. Hardy to -15C. Our collection from the Darjeeling area of northern India.

Cautleya (Zingiberaceae) HWJK2172

spicata 'Arun Flame'

A distinct collection of this ornamental perennial we gathered from Eastern Nepal in 2002 with Dan Hinkley and Jamaica Kincaid. Which has the darkest red stems to about 1m tall, of yellow orange flushed flowers in dense terminal spikes, sheathed by dark red bracts July-September, while the backs of the leaves are tinged purple-red. We have found this collection to be perfectly hardy in an open field even in full sun, all we have done is to apply an 8cm bark mulch every winter. Multi-stemmed mature plants.

Cautleya (Zingiberaceae) BSWJ2103

spicata 'Crûg Canary'

Our own wild collection of this rhizomatous perennial, from the Darjeeling area of Northern India. Forming wide clumps of vertical mahogany-red stems, with broadly lanceolate ribbed leaves, to 1m tall. Bearing June-Oct. terminal spikes of deep-red bracts with protruding orange-yellow orchid-like flowers. Sun or shade in humus rich well drained soil, protect in cold areas. Hardy to -10c.

Cautleya (Zingiberaceae) BSWJ2690

spicata 'Crûg Compact'

A very distinct form of this species that we collected seed of from the Lachung Valley back in 1994. We have grown it in one of our fields since that time where it has only attained a maximum height of only 30cm, meanwhile forming a dense mat of rhizomes. With dark red upright short stems bearing long terminal inflorescences of dark red overlapping bracts with sizeable orange yellow flushed flowers over a long period June to October. Easily grown in any type of humus rich but drained soil in sun to light shade, protect the rhizomes from freezing in cold areas, with a mulch. Hardy to -15C.

Cautleya (Zingiberaceae)

spicata 'Robusta'

Bulbous perennial, forming clumps of vertical red-brown stems, with broadly lanceolate ribbed leaves, to 60cm. Bearing July-Oct. red bracts with protruding orange-yellow flowers. Sun or shade in humus rich well drained soil, protect in cold areas. Hardy to -10c. Despite the cultivar name we find Crûg Canary to be more robust, this is possibly because the plants have been raised from home-grown seed in the past.

Celastrus (Celastraceae) WJC13746

aff. stylosus

A strong growing semi-evergreen twining species with rather large leathery leaves 15-20cm long. That we collected the fruit of in a deep Himalayan valley at 2300m in the autumn of 2013. Bearing axillary or terminal inflorescences of small yellow flowers March to June in the wild, followed by their distinct yellow fruit autumn into early winter, splitting to reveal the red aril covered seed in upright spikes on this collection. Best grown in some shelter from cold winds in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or light shade.

Celastrus (Celastraceae) CWJ12478

dependens

Described as an evergreen (semi in cultivation) much branched scandent shrubs with alternate serrated ovate leaves, bearing an abundance of yellow orbicular capsules in long terminal and axillary panicles. Which is how we found this collection, with the fruit splitting to reveal the contrasting red to orange aril surrounding the dark brown seed. One of my collections gathered from the mountain forest near Chilan in the north of Taiwan in 2007 at 1250m. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or light shade sheltered from cold winds. Syn. C. paniculatus

Celastrus (Celastraceae) BSWJ8572

flagellaris

From one of our collections on the island of Cheju-Dõ, Korea. Vigorous twining climbing shrub with oblong leaves. Flowering in large terminal inflorescences on male plants, axillary on female, followed by orange-red fruit on female plants.

Celastrus (Celastraceae) BSWJ11667

hookeri

A distinct species of this woody twining semi-evergreen climbing shrub that we collected the seed of in the high altitude forest of northern Vietnam, in the autumn of 2006, when the rain was falling by the bucket full. Forming a stocky plant with almost rounded to ovate leaves with conspicuously impressed venation, availing a textured effect. As with so many species the fruiting was good with panicles of rounded yellow capsules splitting to reveal the contrasting orange-red aril surrounding the seed, a feature exploited by flower arrangers particularly in the East. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil in sun or shade.

Celastrus (Celastraceae) CWJ12445

kusanoi

Only forming a small twining climber where I collected the seed of this deciduous species valued for its ornamental yellow orbicular fruit which splits open to reveal the contrasting deep orange aril covered seed. With orbicular-ovate leaves turning a wonderful shade of yellow in the autumn. Found growing at the base of shady cliffs in 2007, on a long abandoned logging trail the Japanese carved into the forests in the high mountains of north-eastern Taiwan. Easily grown in a drained fertile soil, in sun or shade

Celastrus (Celastraceae) BSWJ591

orbiculatus v. papillosus

From one of our collections on the island of Cheju-Dõ, Korea. Vigorous twining climbing shrub with oblong leaves. Flowering in large terminal inflorescences on male plants, axillary on female, followed by orange-red fruit on female plants.

Celastrus (Celastraceae) CWJ12439

punctatus

A deciduous twining shrubs, which I collected seed of from a plant twining to 4m up a maple on the high mountains of eastern Taiwan in 2007 at 2500m. With many branches of finely serrated elliptic alternate leaves, bearing an abundance of yellow orbicular capsules in axillary inflorescences and along the branches, splitting to reveal the contrasting red to orange aril surrounding the dark brown seed. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in sun or shade. Used extensively in the Far East for flower arranging.

Celastrus (Celastraceae) BSWJ4727

stephanotifolius

From the hills overlooking Lake Towada in the cold north of Honshu, Japan, one of our seed collections gathered in 1997 accompanied by Dan Hinkley and Darrell Probst. A vigorous twining woody-stemmed climbing shrub with orbicular to ovate pale green leaves, larger than many species, densely hairy on the veins below. Flowering in axillary inflorescences May to June, followed by yellow globose fruit which split to reveal the red fleshy seed. Easily grown in sun or shade in any type of fertile soil.

Celtis (Ulmaceae) BSWJ12774

choseniana

Although capable of forming sizeable trees, this may take some considerable time, hence only forming small trees or large shrubs in gardens. From seed that we collected from a large protected tree due to its proximity to a temple in Wolch'ulsan in 2010. Where it had formed a tree with wide spreading branches, an indication of its habit even a s a young plant availing a horizontally layered winter effect. The deciduous leaves were 8-9 x 7-8cm broadly ovate thin textured serrated for only part of their length, tips caudate, while the black fruit were large 1.5cm across on short slender stalks. Easily grown in any type of fertile drained soil in good light.

Centropogon (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10282

cordifolius

From one of our seed collections gathered from a once botanically rich area of Mexico in Chiapas, which had been stripped of all its trees. A slender climbing/scandent perennial that is a close relative to Lobelia, which it somewhat resembles in flower, but more in common with Codonopsis when out of flower. With flexuous reddish stems 1.5-2m long, bearing alternate cordate-crenate leaves to 7.5cm long with axillary cerise flowers on slender stalks. Best grown in a sunny well drained position with protection for the roots in winter.

Centropogon (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10455

costaricae

A climbing/scandent perennial that is closely related to Lobelia, which it somewhat resembles in flower, but with more in common with Codonopsis when out of flower. With flexuous stems 50cm long, on the plants we collected the seed from growing on the edge of a dense forest in Alajueca Costa Rica. Bearing alternate elliptic serrated leaves to 8cm long, with axillary red flowers on slender stalks. Best grown in a sunny well drained position with protection for the roots in winter.

Centropogon (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10665

ferrugineus

An unusual perennial from the Lobelia family, with an unusual habit forming long wiry pendant stems of alternate narrowly ovate decorative leaves. Which are conspicuously silver marked along their veins with equally conspicuously incised margins. Bearing in summer through into winter, large (for the size of plant) flared tubular bright pink flowers, with a swollen base, which eventually becomes a ball like seed capsule. A dweller of moist shady cliffs, where we collected it at the edge of the Paramo at high altitude of Manizales in Colombia in 2004. Best grown frost free in a container to allow for its weeping habit.

Centropogon (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10663

hirsutus

Syn. C. ayavacensis. A slender creeping or scandent perennial with flexuous creeping stems to 50cm long, bearing alternate cordate deeply toothed rugose leaves to 7.5cm long with axillary tubular flowers on slender stalks, followed by inflated fruit. A close relative to Lobelia, which it somewhat resembles in flower, but more in common with Codonopsis when out of flower. From one of our seed collections gathered from a botanically rich area of Termales del Ruiz, Colombia at 3350m in 2004. Best grown in a shaded moist position with protection for the roots in winter.

Centropogon (Campanulaceae) BSWJ10657

willdenowianus

A relatively small scandent perennial with flexuous purplish stems to 1m long, bearing alternate rounded to broadly elliptic leaves to 5cm long. With cerise 5-6 cm long tubular flowers on slender stalks appearing from the terminal leaf axils. A close relative to Lobelia, which it somewhat resembles in flower, but more in common with Codonopsis when out of flower. From one of our seed collections gathered from a botanically rich area of Termales del Ruiz, Colombia at 3500m in 2004. Best grown in a shaded moist position with protection for the roots in winter. Syn. C. ayavacensis.

Cephalotaxus (Cephalotaxaceae)

fortunei

Because we participate in the Murabilia Flower Show in Lucca every year, we are given the privilege of being allowed to collect any of the seed that is growing in the Lucca Botanic Gardens (they organise the show). Hence we were so tempted by this noble conifer that we could not resist gathering some of its plum-like fruit when we saw the large handsome shrub that it formed there, still heavy in fruit when we were there in September. Forming a wide well branched shrub from its base clothed in narrow needles along its branchlets, which bear the olive-like fruit terminally. Best grown in part to full shade even in a calcareous soil.

Ceratostigma (Plumbaginaceae) BSWJ7274

asperum

A sub-shrubby species which is normally classified as a shrub, only forming a small plant where I collected it on exposed hot limestone in northern Thailand in 1999. With stems to 50cm long creeping from deep cracks with distinctly rounded mottled foliage and the palest of blue clustered flowers some even white. Best grown with care as hardiness is not tested, in full sun in a free draining soil.

Ceratostigma (Plumbaginaceae)

plumbaginoides

Bushy perennial that bears brilliant blue flowers on reddish branching stems in late summer and autumn. Leaves turn rich red in autumn on acid soil. Height 45cm. Spread 20cm. Grow in full sun and well drained soil.

Ceratostigma (Plumbaginaceae) BWJ8140

willmottianum

Valued for its late summer and autumn colour of flower and foliage, a bushy sub-shrubby perennial that I collected seed of near Baoxing in Western Sichuan, China in 2000. Where this species inhabited the base of steep rocky cliffs forming small colonies of flexuous slender stems to 1m tall, bearing small ovate leaves which turn a rich-red in autumn after bearing bright blue flowers from June to autumn. Best grown in a free draining soil in full sun. The roots may require mulching in cold areas.

Cercis (Caesalpiniaceae) BSWJ12665

chinensis

Forming a small shrubby tree with a strong upright trunk, bearing broad heart-shaped glossy leaves 12.5cm across. Only 3-4m tall where we collected this seed, with a broad crown, the branches heavily draped with a mass of flat brown seed capsule resulting from the bright pink pea-flowers produced in May. Best grown in strong sunlight to encourage flowering, sheltered from the coldest winds, in a freely draining soil with some moisture retention.

Cestrum (Solanaceae) BSWJ14395

buxifolium

I had taken a photograph of this modest yet distinct high altitude shrub in 2004, but without finding any seed. Hence we were particularly pleased when we finally found a small shrub of it laden with fruit during our visit to El Cocuy in February 2015 at around 4,000m. Although we had great difficulty in identifying it, firstly on account that there is not a Flora covering Colombia. The genus was no problem at all, but our identification kept on going back to this species, but always with yellow flowers, until that is I finally tracked down a pressed specimen with bicoloured flowers as is the case in this collection. An exceptionally attractive shrub in the wild with the characteristic tubular flowers held in profusion from the leaf axils close to the ends of the branches.

Cestrum (Solanaceae) BSWJ10255

roseum

An evergreen shrub with soft green elliptic fealty foliage, purple tinged when we found them in the wild, at nearly 3000m altitude in forest clearings of Oaxaca near Ixtalan, Mexico in 2004. Where they formed thickets of upright stems terminating in long lasting clusters of tubular red flowers restricted at the mouth, followed by purple berries. Best grown in a sheltered site out of cold winds in a well drained soil that retains some moisture, in full sun to part shade. Not tested for hardiness.

Chaenomeles (Rosaceae)

cathayensis

A native of western China which is where the seed of the parent plant at Ness Gardens came from. Grown primarily for its salmon-pink flushed white flowers in April which are followed by the largest fruit of the genus, these are yellow, aromatic and pear-shaped highly sought after for making jellies and jams, especially good cooked with apples in pies. Forming a very hardy deciduous shrub to 3 m tall by 3 m wide coping well with most fertile soils with some drainage, in part shade to full sun.

Chengiopanax (Araliaceae)

sciadophylloides

A small unarmed tree, with glabrous thin textured five-foliate leaves which are aristately arranged. Bearing terminal slenderly branched cymose inflorescences of yellowish flowers followed by an abundance of small purple-black depressed-globose fruit on bright red stalks. Syn. Eleutherococcus.

Chionographis (Melanthiaceae)

japonica

Recently introduced rosette forming, evergreen perennial, from the Far East, growing in woodlands or mountain meadows, which are moist in summer. Flowering on stems 10-60cm bearing a bottle-brush like spike of scented flowers, April-May.

Chirita (Gesneriaceae) HWJ1056

speciosa 'Crûg Cornetto'

A spectacular species as the name implies, which I collected (while Dan and Sue cleaned seed) for the second time, from the base of a high waterfall in the lofty mountains surrounding Sapa a small town in North Vietnam, at 1900m in 2003. Where it formed a wide carpet of large rounded overlapping dark green softly hairy leaves which are a bright purple below on this selection. Bearing large foxglove-like blue flowers from June to September. Easily grown in a warm shaded situation with adequate moisture. Untried for hardiness.

Chloranthus (Chloranthaceae) BSWJ11102

glaber

Only ever forming a small succouring shrub that we occasionally encounter in the warmer forests of southern Japan and surrounding countries. With upright green seldomly branching stems to only 80cm tall, with swollen nodes hosting the opposite pairs of lustrous dark green serrated leaves. Bearing terminal spiked inflorescences of small white flowers which consequently form small fleshy orange-red fruit. Normally grown under protection, but can be grown in a well shaded warm and sheltered spot, in a fertile humus rich drained soil.

Chloranthus (Chloranthaceae)

japonicus

Japanese perennials from branching rhizomes, with erect un-branched stems to 20-30cm, having 2 pairs of toothed elliptic-ovate leaves in whirl. Bearing April-June an erect spike of persistent small white bottle-brush like flowers. Best in a humus-rich soil in some shade.

Chloranthus (Chloranthaceae) BSWJ2019

oldhamii

Erect hairless perennials from branching rhizomes, with erect un-branched stems to 50cm, having 4-6 pairs of sharply serrated elliptic-ovate leaves, bearing Apr.-frost erect spikes of persistent small white flowers. Best in a humus-rich soil in some shade.

Chloranthus (Chloranthaceae)

serratus

Erect hairless perennials from branching rhizomes, with erect un-branched stems to 30-50cm, having 2-3 pairs of sharply serrated elliptic-ovate leaves, bearing April-June arching spikes of persistent small white flowers. Best in a humus-rich soil in some shade.

Chlorophytum (Anthericaceae) BSWJ2528

nepalense

A plant that is unaccountably rare in cultivation, having once been a member of the lily family. From one of our early collections gathered in a dense forest in Sikkim in 1994. Forming a bulbous root-stock with a clumping habit bearing long narrow dark-green leaves only 1cm wide with a contrasting central light stripe, below the long arching stems of pendent white-yellow beaked flowers, 30-90cm tall, flowering July-Sept. Best grown in a sheltered shady site in a well drained, but moisture retentive soil.

Chrysanthemum (Asteraceae) BSWJ10872

aff. yezoense

From seed we collected from sand dunes in the far north of Honshu Japan in 2005. Where this prostrate creeping species grew no taller than 7cm, with stiff textured scalloped leaves held close to the ground below the large white ray flowers with contrasting yellow centres August-December. Easily grown in full sun in a free draining soil.

Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ9835

aff. hebetatum

A prostrate creeping species we collected in eastern Taiwan in 2003, where it grew in damp to wet areas of the high mountain forests near Tayuling. Rooting at the nodes it produces a dense mat of orbicular overlapping slightly hairy leaves, covered in early-late spring with umbels of bright green bracty flowers. Best in a moist acid soil.

Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae)

davidianum

Creeping perennial evergreen species from the Himalayas and China, which prefers to grow in a moist shaded to partly shaded site. Where it soon produces an impenetrable prostrate mat as the stems root at the nodes. Smothered in early-late spring with bright lime green-yellow to acid green bracts. Easily grown in acidic to neutral moist soil.

Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ8902

flagelliferum

Our collection of this stoloniferous perennial, forming rosettes of prettily marked and distinctly serrated cordate-orbicular leaves. With flexuous flowering stems to 20cm long of greenish conspicuously yellow bracted flowers. Forming dense weed-smothering patches of stoloniferous growth on long creeping stems rooting at the nodes, bearing larger orbicular leaves. From moist well shaded hillsides of The Kii Peninsular Honshu, Japan. Easily grown in any type of moist fertile soil in shade.

Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae) BSWJ6979

lanuginosum v. formosanum

Our collection of this pubescent perennial creeping by 10-15cm long stolons, forming sizeable colonies of prettily marked and serrated rounded leaves. Rooting at the nodes it produces a dense mat, covered in early-late spring with umbels of bright green bracty flowers. Best in a moist acid soil. From moist densely shaded forest near Yushan the highest mountain in Taiwan.

Chrysosplenium (Saxifragaceae)

macrophyllum

A 'must-have' plant when seen in flower. It's positively obscene, more like a Bergenia in foliage (20cm), but the compound inflorescences give the game away, in style. In mid winter to early spring large bracty umbels of white tinged green flowers, with conspicuous pink stamen on long filaments, are borne in the middle of the softly hairy leaves. Soon sending out long runners to extend its territory and forming sizeable colonies if given adequate moisture and shade.

Cicerbita (Asteraceae) BWJ7891

sp. from China

From a delving tap root a clump forming species with upright slender stems to 90cm tall, that produces strong lobed leaves. Above which are borne sizeable partly pendant mauve-blue multi petalled ray-flowers July-Oct. Spread 40cm. Best grown in full sun in a drained soil. My collection from Longzhoushan in a remote area of Sichuan China.

Cissus (Vitaceae) BSWJ2371

aff. pedata

Vigorous, evergreen, woody stemmed, tendril climber with lustrous leaves divided into 5 leaflets strikingly marked. Height 10m or more. Requires a sheltered site. Our collection from Sikkim.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ7202

acuminata v. sikkimensis

A small species to only a few meters tall with rough-textured trifoliate hairy serrated leaves. Bearing panicles of small bell-shaped palest yellow flowers late summer. Identified by Chiang Mai University as C. sikkimensis. One of my collections made on Doi Phohom-Pok a notorious mountain within The Golden Triangle where I had to be accompanied by the army. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in warm shade flowering into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2153

aff. confusa

A form of this little-known woody stemmed climbing species that we collected high up on a narrow ledge above the Arun River in North-eastern Nepal in 2002 with Dan Hinkley, at 2450m. Clambering over shrubs to 5m tall, with irregularly toothed five-foliate rough-textured leaves, bearing brown bell-shaped flowers July-September. Requires shade and moisture at the root, with full-part sun for flowering.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2176

aff. connata from Nepal

Collected from a relatively small climbing species, with rough-textured ternate coarsely serrated leaves, with very distinct (for the group) very large disc-like leaf nodes and generous many-flowered cymes of large long-haired seed-heads from the upper leaf axils. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun. One of our collections made in the remote part of the Arun Valley, on the Tibetan border with North-eastern Nepal with Dan Hinkley in 2002, at 2650m.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2378

aff. connata from Nepal

From seed gathered from a climbing species, with broad rough-textured five-leafleted coarsely serrated leaves, with distinct disc-like leaf nodes and generous many-flowered cymes of large long-haired seed-heads from the upper leaf axils. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun. One of our collections made in the remote part of the Mewa Khola in North-eastern Nepal with Dan Hinkley in 2002, at 3315m.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9386

aff. connata from West Bengal

Collected from a small climbing species, with rough-textured five-foliate coarsely serrated leaves, with very distinct (for the group) very large disc-like leaf nodes and many-flowered cymes of large seed-heads from the upper leaf axils. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun. One of our collections made on the Singalila Ridge North India at 2900m, in 2002.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9431

aff. connata from West Bengal

One of our collections made on the Singalila Ridge North India at 2450m, in 2002. Collected from a small climbing species, with rough-textured five-foliate coarsely serrated slender tipped leaves, with a distinct (for the group) large disc-like leaf nodes and many-flowered cymes of large seed-heads from the upper leaf axils. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2162

aff. grewiiflora

One of our collections made in the remote upper Arun Valley, on the Tibetan border with North-eastern Nepal with Dan Hinkley in 2002, at 3300m. Seed collected from a relatively small climbing species to only a few meters tall clambering over small shrubs. A form of this well known woody stemmed climber species flowering in May-June bearing an abundance of single white flowers, with some purple in the last form we grew from this area. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2238

aff. grewiiflora

One of our collections made in the very remote valley close to Thudam, on the Tibetan border with North-eastern Nepal with Dan Hinkley in 2002, at 3130m. From a relatively small climbing species, with rough-textured ternate coarsely serrated leaves, with very distinct (for the group) large disc-like leaf nodes and generous many-flowered cymes of large seed-heads from the upper leaf axils. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2251

aff. montana from Nepal

Seed collected from a relatively small climbing species to only a few meters tall clambering over small shrubs. One of our collections made in the very remote valley close to Thudam, on the Tibetan border with North-eastern Nepal with Dan Hinkley in 2002, at 3400m. A form of this well known woody stemmed climber species flowering in May-June bearing an abundance of single white flowers, with some purple in the last form we grew from this area. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7538

aff. rehderiana from China

A form of this little-known woody stemmed climbing species that I collected high on a mountain pass between Sichuan and Yunnan in 2000, at 3600m. A strong growing species to 6m tall, with irregularly toothed five-foliate rough-textured and hairy leaves, bearing pale yellow bells in abundance July-September. Requires shade and moisture at the root, with full-part sun for flowering.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7700

aff. rehderiana from China

From one of my collections made from Napa-Hai, Yunnan China. An herbaceous small species found clambering through scrub on a steep hillside, to only 1m tall. With large trifoliate (ternate) noticeably hairy leaves which are dentate. Bearing in August-September, 4 petalled mid pink flowers with a congested boss of yellow stamen, on long slender stalks (peduncles), followed by large fluffy golden seed-heads.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2116

aff. rehderiana from Nepal

A strong growing form of this little-known woody stemmed climbing species that we collected high on a mountainside above the Arun Valley in North-eastern Nepal in 2002 with Dan Hinkley, at 3000m. Clambering over small trees and shrubs to 6m tall, with irregularly toothed five-foliate rough-textured leaves, bearing pale yellow bells in abundance July-September. Requires shade and moisture at the root, with full-part sun for flowering.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9217

aff. rehderiana from Sikkim

One of our collections made in the remote Lachen Valley Sikkim in 2002, at 2750m. Where this little-known woody stemmed climbing species was abundant, clambering over trees and shrubs to 5m tall, with irregularly toothed five-foliate rough-textured leaves, bearing pale yellow bells in abundance July-September. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) KWJ12090

aff. smilacifolia

Originating from a single layer we collected from Seo Mi Ty in the high mountains of northern Vietnam, where when we encountered it formed a tangled or sprawling plants to 4m. An evergreen species with thick textured heart-shaped leaves blotched silver particularly when juvenile, also can be purple on their undersides. Not flowered for us yet reportedly purple if the identification is correct, relatively large followed by large golden seed-heads. Best grown in a very sheltered south facing site or in a frost free conservatory.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11767

aff. smilacifolia

From our happy hunting grounds in the high mountains of northern Vietnam, where it is sometimes encountered forming small tangled or sprawling plants to 4m. An evergreen species with thick textured heart-shaped leaves blotched silver particularly when juvenile, also can be purple on their undersides. Not flowered for us yet reportedly purple if the identification is correct, relatively large followed by large golden seed-heads. Best grown in a very sheltered south facing site or in a frost free conservatory.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJ1049

aff. smilacifolia

Originating from a single layer we collected from Seo Mi Ty in the high mountains of northern Vietnam, where when we encountered it formed a tangled or sprawling plants to 4m. An evergreen species with thick textured heart-shaped leaves blotched silver particularly when juvenile, also can be purple on their undersides. Not flowered for us yet reportedly purple if the identification is correct, relatively large followed by large golden seed-heads. Best grown in a very sheltered south facing site or in a frost free conservatory.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8333a

buchananiana

A most unusual winter-flowering species that has a very wide spread distribution on the wild. This collection represents what we found near Sapa, high up in the mountains of Northern Vietnam. Where this evergreen woolly woody climber formed a tangle over small trees and shrubs, opening its pendant yellow bell-flowers in the autumn. Best grown in a very sheltered position in full sun, but sheltered at the root, or as we do in a conservatory, where it flowers through the winter.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae)

campaniflora

From seed sent to us by Harry Hay, of an European deciduous species valued for its length of flowering from July to September. When it bears a profusion of pendulous dainty pale blue to violet campanulate flowers over bi or once pinnate glaucous leaves. Easily grown in a moisture retentive fertile soil with the uppermost parts in full sun to light shade. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ4560

chiisanensis

Chiisanensis is our identification of this species that we collected in Chirisan, South Korea, from steep wooded mountainsides. Yellow, deeply ribbed pendant and flared flowers appear, July-Sept, on 2-3m climbing stems. Will grow in any aspect in a fertile soil. Prune hard in early spring.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ12725

chiisanensis

A small rather scarce climbing species we A small rather scarce climbing species we managed to collect seed of from the Chirisan area of South Korea. Where it scrambles over low growing shrubs to only 2-3m, bearing trifoliate veiny leaves and good-sized yellow ribbed pendant flowers, tinged red on their shoulders, July-September. One of the easiest species to grow as long as the roots are kept in cool shade with the top growth in sun. In any aspect in any type of fertile drained soil. Prune hard in early spring.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) RWJ10042

chinensis

Described as being an herbaceous, but partly woody stemmed scandent climber with thin textured 5-15 leafleted dark green leaves. Only forming a relatively small plant to 3m tall, where we collected the seed in the Central Mountains of Taiwan, an area devastated by the 1999 earthquakes. Which carries many-flowered axillary and terminal inflorescences of scented starry white flowers to 22mm across in late summer into autumn. Best grown in a warm sunny spot with adequate shade and moisture at the root.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2200

confusa

An unusual species closely related to C. connata which it shares many of its ornamental attributes with. Collected from a small climbing plant, with rough-textured ternate coarsely serrated leaves and very distinct (for the group) very large disc-like leaf nodes and cymes of red-brown pendant flowers from the upper leaf axils. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun. One of our collections made in the remote part of the Arun Valley, on the Tibetan border with North-eastern Nepal with Dan Hinkley in 2002, at 2800m.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) KWJ12160

fasciculiflora

Worthy of growing for its foliage alone is this evergreen species which we found just a small branch of, poking its head out from dense undergrowth, betraying its identity with fluffy seedbeds complimenting the bronze-purple foliage splashed with silver markings. Of a moderate size and bearing its clusters of pendant creamy flowers in early spring or late winter. Collected on limestone in the Sapa area of northern Vietnam in 2007. Best sited in a warm position out of freezing winds in a fertile soil with some moisture retention.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) L657

fasciculiflora

A wonderful evergreen species introduced and collected by Roy Lancaster, with thick-textured foliage purple flushed when young, heavily marked with silver. Bearing pale green-yellow scented flowers from February-April, to 6 m tall. Best grown in a site sheltered from freezing winds in full sun while shading the roots in a moisture retentive fertile soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8431

flabellata

A most unusual non climbing herbaceous perennial species. An undoubted gem of fairly small stature, a woodland species 80-100cm tall. Bearing large roughly heart shaped leaves sometimes 3-lobed fringed with golden brown hairs, but topped with long stalked most unusual flowers. Which are golden-shaggy brown in appearance long lasting and pendant, composed of thick textured pendant sepals, in its largest form in this very hardy variety we collected from Soraksan South Korea in 2001. Followed by large long lasting golden long tailed seed heads. Best grown in cool lightly shaded woodland type conditions, in a well drained soil that can retain some moisture. It is not clear which is the correct name for this small non-woody non-climbing species/variety with large flowers.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11370

fujisanensis

A small semi-evergreen species to 5m tall with dark green leathery leaves composed of 3-5 leaflets to 9cm long, held on slender purplish stems to 7cm long. Bearing sizeable cymes of creamy-white scented flowers to 4.5 cm across carried August to October, terminally and in the leaf axils. From one of our seed collections gathered from the mountains of the Kii Peninsular in the autumn of 2006. Best grown in shelter from cold winds in good light in any type of humus rich fertile soil that is drained or in a conservatory.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8431

fusca v. coreana = see C.flabellata

A most unusual non climbing herbaceous perennial species. An undoubted gem of fairly small stature, a woodland species 80-100cm tall. Bearing large roughly heart shaped leaves sometimes 3-lobed fringed with golden brown hairs, but topped with long stalked most unusual flowers. Which are golden-shaggy brown in appearance long lasting and pendant, composed of thick textured pendant sepals, in its largest form in this very hardy variety we collected from Soraksan South Korea in 2001. Followed by large long lasting golden long tailed seed heads. Best grown in cool lightly shaded woodland type conditions, in a well drained soil that can retain some moisture. It is not clear which is the correct name for this small non-woody non-climbing species/variety with large flowers.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae)

glaucophylla

A small climbing species originating from southern USA. With leaves divided into small stiff leaflets which are glaucous on their undersides. With pendant urn-shaped reddish-purple flowers with the sepals edged pale and recurving at their tips. Best with careful cultivation in a drained soil that has some good moisture retention, with the roots in shade and the top in sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BWJ8002

gracilifolia

Only forming a small climber 2-4m tall with downy deeply lobbed ternate foliage on this collection. Which I gathered the seed of at 3200m on Longzhoushan, a well forested mountain in Sichuan, on an expedition with Dan Hinkley in 2000. A species that bears clusters of 2-5 flowers in the axils of the previous year's growth, that are white with rounded tips to the sepals. Easily grown in most normal fertile drained soils, best flowering in good light. ******************************As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ3403

henryi

A seldom seen strong growing evergreen climber, with smooth stems bearing simple leathery dark polished green leaves. Bearing pendent bell-shaped, highly scented white flowers from late winter to early spring, seed heads large. Cold hardy. Our introduction from Taiwan. Ideal for a conservatory.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ1668

henryi v. morii

Our introduction from Taiwan. Ideal for a conservatory. A seldom seen strong growing evergreen climber, with smooth stems bearing trifoliate leathery dark polished green leaves. Bearing pendent bell-shaped, highly scented white flowers from late winter to early spring, seed heads large. Cold hardy.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8412

ianthina

A climbing species to 3m tall, that we collected seed of in South Korea. With thick and spongy petalled (sepals), shortly hairy purple-blue flowers, 2 to 4cm long, creamy on their interiors and held on short hairy stems (peduncels) to 3.5cm long with leaf like bracts just below the flower, to 1.5cm long, June-September. Will grow in any aspect in any fertile soil. Prune hard in early spring.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ700

ianthina v. kuripoensis

A climbing species to 3m tall, that we collected seed of in South Korea. With thick and spongy petalled (sepals), shortly hairy purple-blue flowers, 2 to 4cm long, creamy on their interiors and held on short hairy stems (peduncles) to 3.5cm long with leaf like bracts just below the flower, to 1.5cm long, June-September. Will grow in any aspect in any fertile soil. Prune hard in early spring.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11204

japonica

A small unusual climbing species with distinct tri-foliate (ternate) pale green serrated veiny leaves and large solitary axillary seed-heads on long stems, which succeed the reddish-purple nodding campanulate flowers, May-June. From seed we collected in 2005 in the Shizuoka area close to Mt. Fuji in Japan. Where it scrambled up small shrubs to only 2m tall. Easily grown in any aspect in any fertile soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ10990

japonica

From seed we collected in 2005 in the Nagano area close to Mt. Matsuoyama in Japan. Where it scrambled up small shrubs to only 2m tall. Forming a small climbing species with distinct tri-foliate (ternate) pale green serrated veiny leaves and large solitary axillary seed-heads on long stems, which succeed the unusual reddish-purple nodding campanulate flowers, May-June. Easily grown in any aspect in any fertile soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8922

japonica v. obvallata

A small unusual climbing species we collected seed of, from the high mountainous area of The Kii Peninsular Japan. Where it scrambled up small trees to only 3-4m tall, bearing large trifoliate veiny leaves and large solitary axillary seed-heads on long stems, which succeeded the reddish-purple nodding, campanulate flowers subtended by large bracts from, May-June. Easily grown in any aspect in any fertile soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8900

japonica v. obvallata

A small unusual climbing species we collected seed of, from the high mountainous area of The Kii Peninsular Japan. Where it scrambled up small trees to only 3-4m tall, bearing large trifoliate veiny leaves and large solitary axillary seed-heads on long stems, which succeeded the reddish-purple nodding, campanulate flowers subtended by large bracts from, May-June. Easily grown in any aspect in any fertile soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae)

koreana

Originally collected in South Korea, a relatively small deciduous species with dark stems to 5m tall, but usually smaller. With trifoliate variably lobed leaves and pendant purple-blue flowers recurved at their tips, with thick petals (sepals) which are creamy-white on the interiors, held May-August. Easily grown in a shaded situation with adequate drainage and moisture retention at the root.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae)

koreana

Originally collected in South Korea, a relatively small deciduous species with dark stems to 5m tall, but usually smaller. With trifoliate variably lobed leaves and pendant purple-blue flowers recurved at their tips, with thick petals (sepals) which are creamy-white on the interiors, held May-August. Easily grown in a shaded situation with adequate drainage and moisture retention at the root.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJ663

loureiriana

One of our collections made in North Vietnam with Dan Hinkley. An evergreen species with thick textured dark green leaves, pale below to 10cm long. With large panicle-like inflorescences of relatively large white flowers, late summer. For a sheltered sight or a conservatory.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) WJC13712

montana from Sikkim

From seed we collected from on our assent to the Yumthang Valley, growing over a copse of large shrubs and small trees on a riverbank at around 3,300m, in the autumn of 2013. With long green slender stems bearing trifoliate quite large foliage with conspicuously impressed venation and coarsely serrated margins. Bearing axially inflorescences on stiff slender stems with 3-5 large seed-heads on long stiff pedicells. Best grown with a cool root run into good light or full sun, in a well drained soil with plenty of added humus.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6724

montana from Taiwan

A woody stemmed climber seen as a small plant clambering over small Rhododendrons to only 3m tall (possibly larger in gardens), flowering in May-June bearing an abundance of single, white flowers in this form, with yellow anthers. A rare form of this well known species that we collected from Hohuanshan, Taiwan, at a cold and lofty altitude of 3,300m. Easily cultivated in any fertile soil with the roots in shade growing into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6930

montana from Taiwan

A rare form of this well known species that we collected from the very highest mountain in Taiwan, Yushan, at a cold and lofty altitude of 3,400m. Where this woody stemmed climber was seen as a small plant clambering over small shrubs to only 2m tall (possibly larger in gardens), flowering in May-June bearing an abundance of single, white flowers in this form, with yellow anthers. Easily cultivated in any fertile soil with the roots in shade growing into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BWJ8189b

montana group from China

From seed I collected in the mountainous area north of Baoxing, Sichuan. Where it scrambled over large shrubs and small trees to a height of 4-5m at the edge of the forest. Foliage with some serration, with dense axillary plumes of white to pink flowers. Sun or shade in any good soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) WJC13713

montana group from the Himalayas

This identity of this collection is still quite tentative, we believe that it should be this flamboyant rarely seen climbing species allied to the well known C. montana. Bearing ternate leaves with a slight glossiness and bronzy coloration on rambling ribbed stems. Carrying one to few large bright white flowers with contrasting purple-tipped stamen June-October, on distinctly long pedicells in a long succession from the previous seasons lateral buds. From seed we collected from on our assent to a deep valley in the Himalayas, growing over a copse of large shrubs and small trees on a riverbank at around 3,300m, in the autumn of 2013. Must be kept cool at the root in a soil that has some moisture retention while being drained and sheltered from the coldest weather.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae)

napaulensis

Vigorous curiously wintergreen species, to 9m in the wild, easily kept smaller in gardens. With bright green divided leaves, which re-emerge after the heat of summer. Bearing pale yellow-green, pendant bells with conspicuous protruding purple stamens, during the depth of winter even during the coldest periods. Best grown in a sheltered site in full sun and a well drained fertile soil. Never failed to perform well for us even in the harshest of winters, on a south facing wall.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6788

parviloba v. bartletii

From one of our seed collections from Northern Taiwan. A scandent perennial herbaceous climber, with olive green stems 3-4m. Bearing biternate leaves, comprised of 9-15 leaflets. Valued for its abundant conspicuously scented white flowers, with a large boss of white stamens, in axillary cymes August-November. Best grown in a warm sheltered site.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ12622

patens

A form of this large flowered low-climbing species which has been much admired for several years at our nursery, by many a clematis enthusiast. A species which is the parent of many modern day hybrids, that we collected seed of in South Korea. This distinct white flowering form of the species, is unusual in the central boss of stamen and central stripe of the sepals being cream coloured. Distinguishing it from the more normal form which is usually violet-blue in colour.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6281

pierotii

Woody stemmed slightly pubescent climber that we collected seed of in the Unzen peninsular, Kyushu, Japan. Soon forming a vigorous climber with thin textured bi-ternate foliage and few widely opening white-flowered terminal inflorescences mid-late summer. Easily cultivated in any type of drained fertile soil in full sun to part shade.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) CWJ12377

psilandra

A non climbing species, that Finlay Colley and myself collected from powder dry hot sunny cliffs in the Central Mountains of Taiwan in 2007. Forming a woody base with ascending leafy stems to 50-120cm bearing the ternate, opposite leaves, with narrow bell-shaped pink flowers in terminal and axillary clusters, late summer-autumn. We have grown this in an open field for many years without any protection. Best grown in sun to light shade in a fertile drained soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8594

serratifolia from Korea

A small climbing species to only 3-4m tall with 5-foliate serrated leaves arranged pinnately. Bearing axillary small clusters of yellow lantern-shaped flowers 2.7cm long August-October, followed by large fluffy seed-heads which in this collection were tinged purple. Easily grown in any good soil and good drainage. From one of our seed collections from the mountainous area of Sobaeksan South Korea.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7630

sp. from China

One of my collections made in the steep-sided Birong Valley, Sichuan. Where this small climbing species scrambled over shrubs and small trees to a height of 5m, at the edge of the forest. Bearing trifoliate-ternate glossy green shallowly lobed foliage, with the seed-heads held singly or in clusters in the leaf axils. Sun or shade in any good soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7897

sp. from China

One of my collections made on Longzhoushan, Sichuan, China. Where this robust climbing species scrambled over shrubs and small trees to a height of 7m, at the edge of the forest. Bearing trifoliate rough-textured green foliage, with the seed-heads held singly on long stalks in the leaf axils. Cultivate in any kind of fertile soil with the roots in shade and upper part into sun. Do not bury the stem.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ10971

stans

Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial makes a clump of broad, divided leaves, with ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented flowers. Ht 1.5m sun-pt shade retentive soil. Our collection from Central Honshu, Japan. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ11003

stans

Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial makes a clump of broad, divided leaves, with ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented flowers. Ht 1.5m sun-pt shade retentive soil. Our collection from Central Honshu, Japan. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6345

stans

Our collection from Mt. Daisen, Southern Honshu, Japan. Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial makes a clump of broad, divided leaves, with ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented flowers. Height 1.5m sun-part shade retentive soil. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ5073

stans

Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial makes a clump of broad, divided leaves, with ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented flowers. Ht 1.5m sun-pt shade retentive soil. Our collection from Central Honshu, Japan. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6384

stans

A perennial non-climbing species that is woody at its base, forming a dense clump of leafy ascending stems to over a 1m tall. With large well divided leaves and bearing panicles of tubular scented nodding flowers of powder blue, paler outside . Ht 1.5m. Easily grown in full sun-part shade, in a humus rich well drained soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ10892

stans

Quite different from its climbing relatives, this perennial makes a woody clump with broad divided leaves on ascending leafy stems to 1.5m, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented flowers. Our collection from the cold mountains of Aomori in northern Honshu, Japan in the autumn of 2005. Easily grown in sun-part shade in a retentive fertile soil.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) CWJ12455

szuyuanensis

A species we discovered near to Szuyuan village in Ilan County, North Taiwan in 1996. Where it only formed a small scandent/climbing species to only to a few meters tall in the wild, with slender ternate foliage. Bearing axillary cymes of dark yellow pendant flowers with thick textured sepals, August-October. Best grown in sun to part shade in a fertile soil with plenty of added humus. A recent collection with Finlay Colley gathered in 2007.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ7005

tashiroi

A strong climber, with smooth stems, bearing broadly ovate cordate sometimes mottled, evergreen leaflets. Flowers deep purple to yellow with a boss of large white stamen, scented July-Sept, golden seed heads large. Cold hardy, but best in a conservatory. Our collection from Taiwan.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) CWJ12379

tashiroi

A strong climber, with smooth stems, bearing broadly ovate cordate sometimes mottled, evergreen leaflets. Flowers deep purple to yellow with a boss of large white stamen, scented July-Sept, golden seed heads large. Cold hardy, but best in a conservatory. Our collection from Taiwan.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ1423

tashiroi 'Yellow Peril'

A strong and unusually rare evergreen climber, with smooth green stems, bearing triangular-obovate dark glossy green ribbed leaves, mottled when young. The scented flowers are mustard yellow with a boss of large white stamen August-Dec in this form, seed heads large. Cold hardy, but best in a conservatory. Our collection from Taiwan.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8878

terniflora

Woody stemmed slightly pubescent climber that we collected seed from the hills of Hirotani, Kyushu, Japan. A vigorous climber with thick-textured dark green deciduous ternate leaves (that look evergreen), bearing many-flowered lateral inflorescences of white hawthorn-scented flowers August to September. Easily cultivated in any kind of fertile drained soil with the roots in shade and upper part in full sun. Do not bury the stem.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ5751

terniflora

Woody stemmed slightly pubescent climber that we collected seed from the hills of Southern Shikoku Japan. A vigorous climber with many-flowered terminal inflorescences of white flowers August to September. Any drained soil in full sun to part shade.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ998

terniflora

Woody stemmed slightly pubescent climber that we found growing on the island of Kõje-Dõ, South Korea. A vigorous climber with thick-textured dark green deciduous ternate leaves (that look evergreen), bearing many-flowered lateral inflorescences of white hawthorn-scented flowers August to September. Easily cultivated in any kind of fertile drained soil with the roots in shade and upper part in full sun. Do not bury the stem.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9385

tongluensis

One of our best introductions in recent years, of this small rare climbing species with only a restricted distribution in the Himalayas. Only forming a small climber to 3-4m tall resembling its close relative C. montana. Bearing ternate leaves with a slight glossiness and bronzy coloration on rambling ribbed stems. Which also bear one-few large white flowers on long pedicells with contrasting purple-tipped stamen June-October, in long succession at the previous seasons lateral buds. This collection made from the Singalila Ridge Northern India at 2900m. ******************************As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) HWJCM076

tongluensis

A flamboyant sadly neglected hence very rarely seen climbing species allied to the well known C. montana, easily grown when its cooler growing requirements are understood. Bearing ternate leaves with a slight glossiness and bronzy coloration on rambling ribbed stems. Carrying one to few large bright white flowers with contrasting purple-tipped stamen June-October, on distinctly long pedicells in a long succession from the previous seasons lateral buds. Must be kept cool at the root in a soil that has some moisture retention while being drained and sheltered from the coldest weather. Cuttings from our original collection from the Milke Danda Eastern Nepal in 1995. Where it was seen as a small climbing species growing over shrubs.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) GWJ9224

tongluensis from Sikkim

A form of this well known woody stemmed climber species flowering in May-June bearing an abundance of single white flowers, with some purple in the last form we grew from this area. Seed collected from a relatively small climbing species to only a few meters tall clambering over small shrubs. One of our collections made in the remote Lachen Valley Sikkim in 2002, at 2750m. Easily grown in a fertile soil, with the base in shade flowering into the sun.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) CWJ12373

uncinata

A small evergreen species (to 4m) with small narrowly 5-foliate dark green leathery leaves held on slender ridged stems, bearing masses of fluffy balls fixed at the base by black ripe seed which had succeeded the white scented flowers held in generous lateral and terminal panicles May-July. From one of my seed collections gathered in Western Taiwan during the early winter of 2007. Best grown in shelter from cold winds in good light in any type of humus rich fertile soil that is drained or in a conservatory. Could be var. okinawensis, if there are more leaflets than stated.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ4567

urticifolia

Our collection from Chirisan, S. Korea. Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial makes a clump of broad, divided leaves, with ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented flowers. Height 1.5m sun-pt shade retentive soil. ****************************** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8640

urticifolia

Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial forms a clump of woody stems to 1m tall with broad ternate long stemmed leaves on ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of large blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented urn-shaped flowers, August-October. Height 2m sun-part shade retentive but drained soil. Our collection from the mountainous area of Woraksan South Korea.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8454

urticifolia

Our collection from the mountainous area around Odaesan South Korea. Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial forms a clump of woody stems to 1m tall with broad ternate long stemmed leaves on ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented urn-shaped flowers, August-October. Height 2m sun-part shade retentive but drained soil. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8651

urticifolia

Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial forms a clump of woody stems to 1m tall with broad ternate long stemmed leaves on ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented urn-shaped flowers, August-October. Height 2m sun-part shade retentive but drained soil. Our collection from the mountainous area of Woraksan South Korea.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8715

urticifolia

Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial forms a clump of woody stems to 1m tall with broad ternate long stemmed leaves on ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented urn-shaped flowers, August-October. Height 2m sun-part shade retentive but drained soil. Our collection from the mountainous area of Chirisan South Korea. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ8479

urticifolia

Our collection from the mountainous area around Wonju South Korea. Unlike its climbing relatives, this perennial forms a clump of woody stems to 1m tall with broad ternate long stemmed leaves on ascending leafy stems, bearing clusters of blue hyacinth like, sweetly scented urn-shaped flowers, August-October. Height 2m sun-part shade retentive but drained soil. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Clematis (Ranunculaceae)

viorna

A curious small (for us) sub-shrubby species originating from the eastern side of the USA. Where under favourable conditions can scramble to a height of 3m, with variously arranged pinnate sometimes softly hairy deciduous foliage. Bearing cymes of tubby pendant urn-shaped violet-purple, recurved greeny yellow tipped flowers to 2.5cm long in succession June to September. Performs better for us in a warm to hot position in a well drained soil with some moisture retention, scrambling through a shrub for support.

Clerodendrum (Verbenaceae) BSWJ11735

aff. subscaposum

A small species we encountered growing as a single-stemmed branching shrubs to only 2.5m tall. Growing in a partially shaded site at the margins of a disturbed forest, in the north of Vietnam close to the Chinese border. Where the bare branches still retained the large terminal clusters of dark blue fruit and pink calyces, as the ovate to cordate leaves to 20cm long had fallen. Best grown in a drained fertile soil in full sun to part shade with protection from freezing winds.

Clerodendrum (Verbenaceae) BSWJ6651

colebrookianum

An erect suckering shrub to 4m in the wild, with large rounded leaves on long stalks. Bearing tight corymbs of white flowers with long protruding stamen, followed by deep blue berries on fleshy deep pink sepals. Our seed collection from Doi Phohom-pok 2nd highest mountain in Thailand. Best sighted for protection in winter.

Clerodendrum (Verbenaceae) BSWJ4896a

trichotomum

An erect suckering shrub that we collected on Shikoku, Japan. With large purple flushed aromatic leaves on strong growing stems. Bearing tight corymbs of very fragrant white flowers, followed by deep blue berries on fleshy pink calyces. For sun or part shade in a drained soil.

Clerodendrum (Verbenaceae) BSWJ4896

trichotomum 'Shiro' (white calyx)

A new form of this bushy suckering shrub that we collected on the island of Shikoku, Japan in 1997 in the company of Dan Hinkley and Darrell Probst. With large pale green (in this form) aromatic leaves on strong upright branching stems. Bearing terminal tight corymbs of very fragrant white flowers, soon followed by deep blue berries on fleshy white (shiro in Japanese) calyces. Best grown in full sun to light shade for flowering, in a well drained soil that retains a bit of moisture. This clone is a different collection to that found by Kew several years later in northern Japan.

Clethra (Clethraceae) BSWJ11562

barbinervis

From one of our seed collections gathered on a memorable day in the high mountains of Ehime on Shikoku island Japan in the autumn of 2006. An adaptable well branched shrub, eventually forming a stunning small tree with a wonderfully ornamental exfoliating bark. Bearing oblanceolate leaves and long more or less drooping racemes of white scented flowers July-August, which develop to long slender catkin-like racemes of seed as the leaves change to red and yellow in the autumn. Best cultivated in an acidic moisture retentive soil in full sun to part shade. ***** ***** ***** ***** Large flowering-sized plants also available from the open ground when dormant. These are at least 2m tall above ground. Equivalent to 30lt pots.

Clethra (Clethraceae) BSWJ11702

fabri

This has to be one of the most ornamental species of this highly regarded genus. Sadly endangered where we find the small trees growing in the mountains of the far north of Vietnam, normally seen cut down and regenerating strongly with bright red hairy stems. Were that not enough to tempt you, the foliage and new growth are also bright red only slowly transforming to green as the season progresses and the ovate-elliptic softly hairy leaves expand to 15-20 × 8-10cm. If you are still not tempted there are terminal inflorescences of 20cm long spikes of small white flowers in summer. Best grown in a moisture retentive drained soil, in sun or light shade sheltered from freezing winds.

Clethra (Clethraceae) FMWJ13037

fabri

My second collection of this most ornamental species of this highly regarded genus. Sadly endangered where we find the small trees growing in the mountains of the far north of Vietnam, normally seen cut down and regenerating strongly with bright red hairy stems. Were that not enough to tempt you, the foliage and new growth are also bright red only slowly transforming to green as the season progresses and the ovate-elliptic softly hairy leaves expand to 15-20 × 8-10cm. If you are still not tempted there are terminal inflorescences of 20cm long spikes of small white flowers in summer. From our 2011 collection in Séo Mí Tý. Best grown in a moisture retentive drained soil, in sun or light shade sheltered from freezing winds.

Clethra (Clethraceae) FMWJ13401/5

petelotii

Originating from a seed collection gathered from a very exposed ridge on the Vietnamese border with China in Y Tý at 2340m in the autumn of 2011. Possibly the most ornamental species of this genus, but sadly endangered where we find it in the mountains of the far north of Vietnam. Growing into a different habit in the exposed conditions to only around 1m tall with bright red hairy stems. While foliage and new growth are also bright red only slowly transforming to green as the season progresses and the ovate-elliptic softly hairy leaves can expand to 15-20 × 8-10cm. If you are still not tempted there are terminal inflorescences of 20cm long spikes of small white flowers in summer. Best grown in a moisture retentive drained soil, in sun or light shade sheltered from freezing winds.

Clintonia (Convallariaceae)

andrewsiana

Clumping woodland perennial from moist redwood forests of California slowly making clumps of wide glossy green leaves, bearing on stems 25-50cm, umbels of funnel-shaped deep-red flowers, followed by blue/black berries, May-July.

Clintonia (Convallariaceae)

udensis

Shortly creeping woodland perennial from moist hills of E. Asia slowly making clumps of wide glossy green leaves, bearing on stems, nodding umbels of funnel-shaped white/pale-mauve flowers, followed by black berries, April-July.

Clintonia (Convallariaceae) HWJK2339

udensis from Nepal

A Nepalese collection of this shortly creeping woodland perennial from around a cold Topke Gola, where I spent a day searching through the surrounding forests with Dan Hinkley for the wonderful blue fruit on tall branching stems. Slowly forming clumps of wide glossy green leaves, bearing nodding umbels of funnel-shaped white-pale-mauve flowers April-July, followed the blue-black berries.

Clintonia (Convallariaceae)

umbellulata

Shortly creeping woodland perennial from moist hills of N.America, slowly making clumps of wide glossy green leaves, bearing on stems 15-40cm, spherical heads of scented white, sometimes purple spotted flowers, followed by black berries, May-June.

Cocculus (Menispermaceae) BSWJ12618

orbiculatus

Semi-woody (woody at its base) twining climber we collected the seed of in South Korea in the autumn of 2010. With thick-textured ovate-orbicular deciduous leaves on stems to 2m long, bearing panicles of small greenish flowers in spring, followed by conspicuous blue-black berries by late summer through autumn. Will grow sun-part shade in any retentive drained soil. One of the many so called moon-seed climbers, because of the unusual shape of its seed, this species hardy to –20C.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) HWJCM70

affinis

From our first collection trip in N. E. Nepal in 1995, an herbaceous twining climber with large heart-shaped foetid hairy leaves. Bearing an abundance of purplish-blue pendent bells. Height 1.5-2m. Plant base in well drained shade and protect root from severe frost.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) GWJ9228

affinis

From one of our collections gathered in the remote valley of Lachen near a small village of Thongdu Sikkim, in the autumn of 2002 with Sally Godard at 2,850m. Emerging in spring from a delving tuberous root, reddened slender stems twine up to 2m tall. Bearing large foxy-scented heart-shaped serrated leaves with axillary bell-shaped, red recurved tipped flowers July-October. Plant base in well drained shade.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) HWJK2059

affinis

Emerging in spring from a delving tuberous root, reddened slender stems twine up to 2m tall. Bearing large foxy-scented heart-shaped serrated leaves with axillary bell-shaped, red recurved tipped flowers July-October. Our collection made along with Dan Hinkley in 2002 in the Arun Valley, North-eastern Nepal. Plant base in well drained shade.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) HWJK2185

affinis

One of our collections made in the very remote valley close to Thudam, on the Tibetan border with North-eastern Nepal with Dan Hinkley in 2002, at 2500m. Emerging in spring from a delving tuberous root, reddened slender stems twine up to 2m tall. Bearing large foxy-scented heart-shaped serrated leaves with axillary bell-shaped, red recurved tipped flowers July-October. Plant base in well drained shade.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) HWJK2151

affinis

Our collection from high up on a narrow ledge above the Arun River in North-eastern Nepal in 2002 with Dan Hinkley, at 2450m. Emerging in spring from a delving tuberous root, reddened slender stems twine up to 2m tall. Bearing large foxy-scented heart-shaped serrated leaves with axillary bell-shaped, red recurved tipped flowers July-October. Plant base in well drained shade.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) GWJ9352

benthamii from Sikkim

A new species to us, emerging in spring from a delving tuberous root, with robust stems twinning up to 1.5m tall. Bearing large foxy-scented serrated ovate leaves with axillary campanulate-elongated green, recurved tipped flowers July-October. Plant base in well drained shade. One of our collections made in a remote valley close to Lachung Eastern Sikkim in 2002, at 2900m.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) BWJ7812

convolvulacea v. hirsuta

One of the many variations of this species I collected seed of in Yunnan China. With saucer-shaped, pale blue flowers, 2.5-4cm across, are borne on a herbaceous twining climber with long narrow leaves, forming a congested mass. Height to 2m. Requires partial shade and well drained acid soil.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) BWJ7532

forrestii

A delightful sight when I came across seed of these small twining species in the very north of Yunnan, China. Forming a congested mass of very slender twinning stems with small ovate-elongated leaves with very large in comparison, wide saucer-shaped, blue red centred flowers, 4-7.5cm across. Height to 1.5m. Requires partial shade and well drained acid soil.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) BWJ7847

forrestii

From my collection on The Cangshan, Yunnan China. Where this herbaceous twining climber was commonly seen scrambling through shrubs, with 3cm long, leaves. Widely bell to saucer-shaped, blue flowers, 2.5cm across, are borne in summer. Height to 2m. Requires partial shade and well drained acid soil. As the growth rate is phenomenally fast when it does start, the cost of the plants will double as it is virtually impossible to untangle them. So please order early.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) HWJK2155

gracilis

A new species to us, from our collection made high up on a narrow ledge above the Arun River in North-eastern Nepal in 2002, with Dan Hinkley at 2450m. Emerging in spring from a delving tuberous root, with wiry stems twinning up to 3m tall forming a tangled mass. Bearing small serrated slightly foxy-scented leaves with lots of axillary campanulate-elongated blue, flowers July-October. Plant base in well drained shade. Syn. Leptocodon.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae)

grey-wilsonii

Forming a congested mass of very slender twinning stems with broadly ovate shallowly serrated leaves with very large in comparison, wide saucer-shaped, blue red-centred flowers, 4-7.5cm across. Height to 1.5m. Requires partial shade and well drained acid soil. Protect from slugs.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae)

grey-wilsonii 'Himal Snow'

An old favourite which we have grown for a long time, with congested very slender thread-like twinning stems arising from its fleshy deeply delving rootstock. Bearing ovate shallowly serrated thin textured grey green leaves with very large in comparison, wide saucer-shaped, white flowers. Easily grown in a well drained soil with some humus for moisture retention, best grown though a small shrub for support, Protect from slugs especially when emerging.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) GWJ9442

inflata

An intriguing and puzzling looking species we collected seed of close to Lava in the north of India in 2002. From an area of tall dense forest at an altitude of 2200m where this twinning species climbed shrubs at the edge of the forest, bearing large cordate leaves with axillary inflated pale green speckled purple flowers, with distinct deep purple interiors, followed by purple 10-sided flat-topped berry like seed capsules. Full sun-part shade and well drained soil. Frost free?

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) RWJ10007

kawakamii

From a collection we gathered with Dick Hayward on our ascent of Yushan, the highest mountain in Taiwan, in 2003 at 2650m. Where this small alpine species formed an herbaceous twining climber, with small ovate foetid hairy leaves, often seen growing on open mountainsides or scrambling up small shrubs. Bearing an abundance of distinctive long waisted yellow-greenish pendent bell-flowers. Height 1-1.5m. Best grown with the plant's base in well drained shade with the flowering stems in sun.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) BSWJ6922

kawakamii

A collection of this small alpine species we collected on our ascent of Yushan in 1999, to inspect the damage after the earthquake, with the National Park. An herbaceous, twining climber, with small ovate foetid hairy leaves, often seen growing on open mountainsides. Bearing an abundance of distinctive long waisted yellow-greenish pendent bell-flowers. Height 1-1.5m. Plant base in well drained shade.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) BSWJ6975

kawakamii

A collection of this small alpine species we collected on our ascent of Yushan in 1999, to inspect the damage after the earthquake, with the National Park. An herbaceous, twining climber, with small ovate foetid hairy leaves, often seen growing on open mountainsides. Bearing an abundance of distinctive long waisted yellow-greenish pendent bell-flowers. Height 1-1.5m. Plant base in well drained shade.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) BSWJ5437

lanceolata

One of our collections from Honshu, Japan, this herbaceous, twining climber has ovate, leaves. Bearing large pale yellow-greenish heavily marked reddish purple within flowers, 3-3.5cm across, Aug-Sept. Height to 2.5m. Requires partial shade and well drained soil. Root used as a vegetable in Korea.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) BSWJ5099

lanceolata

One of our introductions from South Korea, this herbaceous, twining climber has ovate, leaves. Bearing large pale yellow-greenish heavily marked reddish purple within, flowers, 3-3.5cm across, Aug-Sept. Height to 2.5m. Requires partial shade and well drained soil. Root used as a vegetable in Korea.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae)

rotundifolia var. angustifolia

From Western China, an herbaceous twining climber with narrowly elliptic leaves on stems twining to 3m. Bearing sizeable purple veined pale green bell-shaped, flowers, 3.5cm long, Aug-September. Requires partial shade and well drained soil.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae)

vinciflora

Herbaceous, twining climber with 3cm long, leaves. Widely bell to saucer-shaped, blue flowers, 2.5cm across, are borne in summer. Height to 1m. Requires partial shade and well drained acid soil.

Codonopsis (Campanulaceae) HWJK2435

viridis

Collected this large twinning species on a memorable day in 2002 with Dan Hinkley, just above the town of Taplejung in Eastern Nepal. Where this species grew on the edge of the forest with large heart-shaped serrated leaves, on a mass of tangled wiry stems. Bearing large cup-shaped flowers green on their exterior, red veined on the interior and recurved tips. The day was memorable as the Maoist invaded the town just after we departed.

Colignonia (Nyctaginaceae) BSWJ10644

ovalifolia

A scandent sub-shrub abundant in the areas just below the Paramo in Colombia, a puzzling plant which took quite a bit to identify as we had not come across the family Nyctaginaceae before. Bearing small rounded thin-textured fresh green foliage only shallowly lobed and a cloud of Thalictrum-like pale pink fluffy flowers surrounding the plants. Best grown in some shelter in sun or part shade, in a fertile moisture retentive soil. Reported to be hardy to -5C.

Colocasia (Araceae) BSWJ6909

formosana

A wonderfully architectural plant from one of our wild seed collections gathered from a moist bank in the Long-Jen Valley eastern Taiwan in 1999. Arising from a central tuberous rootstock, forming a short trunk bearing large rounded to ovate grey-green leaves on strong long grooved petioles with a relatively small white spathed inflorescence. Forming long stolons, which generate new plants on contact with moist soil. Best grown in a humus rich soil that does not dry out, in either sun or shade protecting the plant with a deep layer of debris to prevent freezing over the winter. Large plants.

Colquhounia (Lamiaceae)

coccinea

A Buddleja-like evergreen to semi-evergreen, open medium to large sized shrub. With aromatic, sage-green textured leaves and whorls of scarlet-orange flowers in late summer and autumn. Requires full sun and well drained soil. Height 2.8m Spread 2m.

Colquhounia (Lamiaceae) BSWJ7222

coccinea v. mollis

Collected from the summit of Doi Chiang-Dao, Northern Thailand, where it formed a compact evergreen or semi-evergreen shrub. With sage-green slightly toothed woolly leaves and whorls of scarlet flowers in late summer and autumn. Requires full sun and well drained soil. Height 1.5m Spread 1.6m.

Commelina (Commelinaceae) BSWJ10353

tuberosa

From one of our collections which we found on the over-grazed high altitude plateau of Sierra de los Cuchumatanes Guatemala in 2004. Where this species grew in marshy ground with broadly ovate stem-clasping leaves on stocky short stems to 15cm tall topped by a succession of bracted deep blue flowers. Best grown in fertile soil with some moisture retention in full sun, protect the roots from freezing.

Conandron (Gesneriaceae) BSWJ8929

ramondioides

Our collections of this perfectly hardy shade loving Saintpaulia relative from alpine forests of the Kii Peninsular Japan, where it had seeded into nooks and crannies on vertical rock faces close to a stream. Much cultivated in Japan for its purple flowers on short scapes 10-30cm tall, with up to 40 flowers and its many colour forms, with only a few relatively large rugose deciduous leaves. Best grown in a wall that does not dry out in shade.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ12865

chinensis

A clump forming perennial species originating from Chinese forests and shaded valleys. With fern-like evergreen dark green deeply 3-5 lobed serrated foliage, triangular in outline unequally thrice parted to 10cm long and wide. Producing upright central scapes to 25cm tall bearing a 3-8 flowered inflorescences of yellowish green recurving flowers, eventually transforming to a boss of green hooked carpels January to April, depending on weather. Easily grown in a well drained soil with some moisture retention in full or part shade.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae)

japonica

An early spring flowering evergreen woodland perennial which occurs in the three main northern Japanese islands in cool damp forests. From a thick shortly creeping rhizome, bearing fern-like ternate leathery broadly ovate leaves, below the 10-25cm stems, with white flowers February-April. Well drained shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae)

japonica v. dissecta

A variety of this evergreen woodland perennial which occurs alongside the typical form throughout its range in Japanese damp forests. With a thick shortly creeping rhizome, bearing dissected small twice ternate leathery broadly ovate leaves, below the 10-15cm stems, with white flowers February-April. Well drained shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae)

japonica v. major

Evergreen woodland perennial found in Japan, growing in steep mountainous woodlands. Thick shortly creeping rhizome, bearing thrice ternate leathery broadly ovate leaves, below the 10-25cm stems, with white flowers March-April. Well drained shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ12863

laciniata

Known in its native area along the Pacific North West of North America as Oregon gold threads or Cut-leaf gold threads. A slowly spreading evergreen perennial species from relatively low altitude moist forests and shaded valleys, yet possessing plenty of hardiness. With glossy fern-like evergreen dark green leaves that are basal, deeply 3-5 lobed serrated, triangular in outline and unequally thrice parted to 10cm long and wide. With one to several ascending stems from 5-12 cm long at flowering, elongating above the leaves when in fruit. Flowering very early in the spring with 2-4 nodding linear-lanceolated flowers. Best grown in light humus soil that is drained, but never dries out, in shade to light shade.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ7366

omeiensis

Wonderful evergreen woodland perennial growing from a thick shortly creeping rhizome, valued for its frond-like ferny elongated thick-textured foliage. Originating from mountainous moist woodlands on E'meishan Sichuan China. Bearing green-yellow starry flowers on short upright stems to 10cm February-April. Easily grown in a well drained soil with some moisture retention in full or part shade.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ1677

quinquefolia

An evergreen little gem which we collected seed of from forest floors of the high mountain forests of Northern Taiwan. Which has a short creeping rhizome, bearing irregularly toothed five-parted dark glossy green leaves, below the 7-15cm stems, having white cup-shaped flowers April-May. Well drained shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae)

quinquefolia v. ramosa

An evergreen variety of this wonderful little species which we acquired from cultivation in Japan. Which has a short rhizome, bearing pinnately toothed five-parted dark glossy green leaves, below the 7-15cm stems, having white cup-shaped flowers Feb.-May. Well drained shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6000

ramosa

Evergreen woodland perennial we collected on the botanically intriguing island of Yakushima Japan, growing in dense mountainous moist woodlands. With a thick shortly creeping rhizome, bearing small twice ternate leathery broadly ovate leaves, below the 10-15cm stems, with white flowers March-April. Well drained shade and 'woodsy' soil.

Coptis (Ranunculaceae) BSWJ6030

ramosa

Wonderful evergreen woodland perennial we collected on the botanically intriguing island of Yakushima Japan, growing in dense mountainous moist woodlands. With a thick shortly creeping rhizome, bearing small twice ternate leathery broadly ovate leaves, below the 10-15cm stems, with white flowers February-April. Easily grown in a well drained soil with some moisture retention in full or part shade.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

arborea

Grown from wild collected seed from New Zealand. Deciduous, arching shrub or small tree with pinnate leaves. The inconspicuous flowers are followed by glistening, black fruits in summer and autumn. Any well drained soil. Height 1m. Spread 1.5m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) BSWJ019

intermedia

One of our introductions from the high mountains of Taiwan. A deciduous, arching shrub with sizeable pinnate leaves with red tints particularly in the autumn. Bearing red fruits in summer and autumn a result of the small flowers with conspicuous yellow stamen. Any well drained soil, avoid rich growing conditions. Height 1.5m. Spread 1.5m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

japonica

A deciduous, arching shrub with sizeable pinnate leaves with red tints that are stronger in the autumn. Flowering from March on, bearing small red tipped flowers with conspicuous stamen soon followed by succulent red fruits in summer and autumn. Any type of well drained soil in sun to part shade, avoid moist rich soils. Height 1.5m. Spread 2m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) BSWJ10898

japonica

From one of our seed collections gathered in the far north of Honshu Island Japan in the autumn of 2005. Where this deciduous species grew on steep cliffs within a large forested area on our way to the west coast. Forming arching shrubs with pinnate fern-like leaves colouring red in autumn, with succulent red fruits the result of small red-tipped flowers held in congested pendulous spikes appearing on the bare stems in March-April. Easily grown in a well drained poor soil. Height 1.2m. Spread 2m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) BSWJ3877

japonica ssp. intermedia

A very rare form of this deciduous, arching shrub with pinnate leaves red in autumn. Flowering March, small red tipped, followed by succulent red fruits in summer and autumn. Any well drained soil. Height 1.5m. Spread 1.5m. Our collection from N. Luzon Philippines.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

kingiana

A dwarf suckering ground covering shrub throwing out graceful frond-like stems with pinnate leaves, creating dense fern-like clumps. The insignificant flowers are followed by purple fruits. well drained soil.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

microphylla

From seed collected by Tim Prebble in central Ecuador. A small suckering ground covering shrub throwing out graceful frond-like stems with pinnately arranged glaucous-grey tiny leaves, creating a dense fern-like effect. The insignificant flowers are followed by wine coloured fruits. Well drained soil in sun, hardiness unknown.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) BSWJ8999

microphylla

Our introduction of the true species from seed we collected in Guatemala. A small suckering ground covering shrub throwing out graceful frond-like stems with pinnately arranged glaucous-greyish fern-like branches of tiny leaflets and dense terminal spikes of deepest purple currant-like fruit. Well drained soil in sun, protect roots from frost. For far too long the name has been miss-applied to C. pteridoides a New Zealand creeping species

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) BSWJ14003

myrtifolia

Being the National Plant Collection holder of this genus we could hardly just walk past a large colony of this species in full fruit, even on holiday with our grandchildren. Such was the case during the summer of 2013, where a large colony of upright plants grew on the dry rocky hillside up in the coastal mountains outside Competa in the Axarquia region of southern Spain. With narrowly elliptic stiff opposite foliage all along the reddish few branched stems to 1.5m tall, terminating in pinkish shortly winged fruit that swell on ripening black. Easily grown in a hot sunny sheltered situation in a well drained soil. Hardy for us for well over 20 years.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

myrtifolia

From the Mediterranean region, a deciduous arching sub-shrub with glossy pinnately arranged leaves. The inconspicuous flowers are borne in axially clusters, soon followed by glistening black fruits in summer and autumn. Any well drained soil in sun. Height 1.5m. Spread 1.5m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

napalensis

Forming an impressive shrub in our garden, this deciduous, arching shrub has pinnately arranged leaves turning red in autumn. The individually inconspicuous flowers are born in conspicuous racemes on the bare stems in winter followed by succulent, black-red fruits in summer and autumn. Any well drained soil. Height 3m. Spread 2m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) BWJ7755

napalensis

From my own seed collection made at altitude in Yunnan on a steep rocky mountainside. Where this plant was common, forming large multi-stemmed shrubs to 5m tall, with pinnate leaves on bright red shoots. In our garden it only attains a height of 3m, where it is much admired for its strongly arching fast-growing stems, bearing long pendant racemes of small flowers on the bare wood in early spring, followed by succulent black-red fruits in summer. Any well drained soil. Spread 1.5m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

pteridoides

(Syn. microphyllum hort.) A dwarf suckering ground covering sub-shrub from New Zealand, throwing out graceful frond-like stems with pinnately arranged leaves, creating dense fern-like clumps. The insignificant flowers are followed by glossy black fruits. Best grown in a well drained soil in sun or shade. Very tolerant if of impoverished soils if not water-logged.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) HCM98178

ruscifolia

From Dan Hinkley's wild collected seed Chile. Deciduous, arching sub-shrub with pinnate leaves. The inconspicuous flowers are followed by glistening, black fruits in summer and autumn. Any well drained soil. Height 1m. Spread 1.5m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

sarmentosa

From wild collected seed from New Zealand. Deciduous, arching sub-shrub with pinnate leaves. The inconspicuous flowers are followed by succulent, black-purple fruits in summer and autumn. Any well drained soil. Height 75cm. Spread 1m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

sarmentosa Lake Wakitipu form

Deciduous, arching sub-shrub with pinnate leaves. The inconspicuous flowers are followed by succulent, black-purple fruits in summer and autumn. Any well drained soil. Height 75cm. Spread 1m. From wild collected seed from New Zealand

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) KWL118

terminalis f. fructu-rubro

I have been on the lookout for this form for quite some time (being the National Collection holder). Luckily Michael Wickenden et al found this reputedly red fruiting form on his Upper Dulong River expedition to north-western Yunnan, China in 2008. A form of this deciduous sub-shrub which eventually builds up a woody base, with red arching stems bearing opposite pairs of pinnately arranged ovate leaves. With terminal cylindrical spikes of inconspicuous red-tipped flowers, which are soon followed by seed-encasing succulent lobed translucent orange-amber flower-like fruit rather than a bright red, in summer through autumn. Easily grown in any type of well drained soil with a bit of moisture retention in good light.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae)

terminalis v. xanthocarpa

A deciduous sub-shrub which eventually builds up a woody base, with red arching stems bearing opposite pairs of pinnately arranged fern-like leaves and terminal cylindrical spikes of inconspicuous red-tipped flowers which are soon followed by seed-encasing succulent lobed translucent amber-yellow flower-like fruits in summer through autumn. Any well drained soil. Height 1.5m. Spread 2m.

Coriaria (Coriariaceae) HWJK2112c

terminalis v. xanthocarpa

A deciduous sub-shrub which eventually builds up a woody base, with red arching stems. Bearing opposite pairs of pinnately arranged fern-like leaves and terminal cylindrical spikes of inconspicuous red-tipped flowers. Which are soon followed by seed-encasing succulent lobed translucent amber-yellow flower-like fruits in summer through autumn. Any well drained soil. Height 1.5m. Spread 2m. Our seed collection made high above the upper Arun Valley in Eastern Nepal from 3200m.

Cornus (Cornaceae)

capitata

A highly prized small evergreen tree or shrub with an undeservedly poor reputation for hardiness, which has grown in our gardens for many years without any cold damage. Bearing an arresting display of flower heads with showy subtending creamy yellow bracts which age pink, June-July, followed in October by large strawberry-like fruit. Best grown in a sheltered site out of cold winds, sun and well drained soil. Ht 5m.

Cornus (Cornaceae) KWJ12225

hongkongensis ssp. aff. gigantea

From seed we collected from a remote valley in the Hoang Lien Mountains in northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2007, where a few of these small evergreen trees grew on a riverbank to only 4-5m tall. With small ovate leaves 10 x 5 cm on red petioles, carried on greyish branches which had borne a display of flower heads with showy subtending creamy yellow bracts, resulting in upright peduncles 6 cm long with orbicular fruit 2.5 cm across, green at that time later ripening red. Easily grown in any kind of fertile moisture retentive soil with good drainage out of freezing winds.

Cornus (Cornaceae) BSWJ11700

hongkongensis ssp. gigantea

Originating from seed we gathered in the autumn of 2006 from a remote area of northern Vietnam close to the border with China. Of a highly prized small evergreen tree or shrub to 5m tall, with bright red new growth bearing an arresting display of flower heads with showy subtending creamy yellow bracts which age to pink, June-July, followed in October by orbicular fruit. Best grown in a sheltered site out of cold winds, sun and well drained soil with some moisture retention.

Cornus (Cornaceae) BSWJ11791

hongkongensis ssp. tonkinensis

Originating from seed we collected from a small evergreen tree-like species in 2006, which was growing on the bank of a stream within the forest on the slopes of the highest and surprisingly cold mountain in northern Vietnam. One of several species of dogwood we collected seed of from this area with ovate mid-green leaves and bearing an arresting display of flower heads with showy subtending creamy yellow bracts which age to pink, June-July, followed in October by orbicular fruit. Easily grown in any kind of fertile moisture retentive soil with good drainage.

Cornus (Cornaceae) BSWJ12610

kousa

A highly valued small to medium sized tree, which we were pleasantly surprised to find covered in large bright red plump fruit (sorry no image faulty memory card) in the Sobaeksan area of South Korea, yet another cold inland area. Here the trees were only 4m tall with bare trunks supporting the rounded canopy of ovate-elongated consciously veined fresh green leaves, just starting to take on autumnal hints. Easily grown in most types of moisture retentive soils, flowering and fruiting best in sun, although shade tolerant.

Cornus (Cornaceae) RLR60

macrophylla

A most uncommon tree for some reason, maybe like ourselves there has been difficulty in germinating the seed. As we encounter this wonderful tree with a wide but tall canopy of glossy broadly ovate elliptic acuminate leaves frequently in Korean forests. Where quite often the wide bright red stalked cymes bearing rounded blue fruit litter the ground. These are the result of the creamy white flowers bore in July-August. Easily grown in most fertile drained soils.

Cornus (Cornaceae) HWJ849

sp.

A puzzling collection gathered from a species growing as an epiphyte, one of several species of dogwood we collected seed of in 2003, from on and around the surprisingly cold Fansipan, the highest mountain in the north of Vietnam. Where it only formed a small wiry specimen in a single location at 2050m, with very small orbicular scaly fruit and ovate foliage. Will grown in any kind of fertile moisture retentive soil with good drainage.

Cornus (Cornaceae) BSWJ8776

walteri

From fruit we gathered from a medium sized tree on the island of Chejudõ South Korea in 2001. Forming a wide canopy bearing ovate-acuminate leaves with conspicuously impressed parallel venation. With terminal cymes of globose blue-black fruit on red stems, which had succeeded the starry white flowers. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any type of drained fertile soil. ******* ********** ************* This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants when dormant, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Cortaderia (Poaceae)

richardii

A tall imposing grass, forming large clumps of arching grassy leaves, thick in texture. With upright stems 2-3m tall topped by single-sided plumes of fluffy inflorescence. Best in full sun in a moist but well drained soil. Flowering from May on, hardy to -15c. **

Corydalis (Papaveraceae) BSWJ2951

chaerophylla

Perennial with fleshy roots. Producing rosettes of fern-like, bronzed tinted leaves. Dense spikes of yellow flowers are borne May-Oct. Height & spread 60cm. Our collection from the forests of Phulchoki C. Nepal.

Corydalis (Papaveraceae)

elata

A clump forming perennial species originating from the moist acidic woodlands of China, which can form colonies in time. With pleasing ferny divided bright green foliage which emerges fresh each spring, bearing stems to well above the foliage of bright blue long spurred flowers from late spring in succession until they feel the heat of summer. Easily grown in preferably lime free soil with plenty of added humus in light to dense shade.

Corydalis (Papaveraceae)

flexuosa 'Blue Panda'

Originating from the moist acidic woodlands of Western China, a slowly creeping perennial, which can form sizeable colonies in time. Of pleasing ferny divided foliage which emerges fresh each spring, bearing short stems to just above the foliage of bright china-blue flowers from early spring a succession until they feel the heat of summer which renders them dormant. Easily grown in preferably lime free soil with plenty of added humus, if grown in cool enough shade the flowering can be prolong through the summer.

Corydalis (Papaveraceae) CD&R528c

flexuosa 'China Blue'

Originating from the moist acidic woodlands of Western China, a slowly creeping perennial, which can form sizeable colonies in time. Of pleasing ferny divided bronze tinged foliage which emerges fresh each spring, bearing short stems to just above the foliage of bright china-blue flowers from early spring in succession until they feel the heat of summer which renders them dormant. Easily grown in preferably lime free soil with plenty of added humus, if grown in cool enough shade the flowering can be prolong through the summer.

Corydalis (Papaveraceae) CD&R528b

flexuosa 'P'ere David'

Originating from the moist acidic woodlands of Western China, a slowly creeping perennial, which can form sizeable colonies in time. Of pleasing ferny divided foliage which emerges fresh each spring, bearing short stems to just above the foliage of bright blue flowers from early spring in succession until they feel the heat of summer which renders them dormant. Easily grown in preferably lime free soil with plenty of added humus, if grown in cool enough shade the flowering can be prolong through the summer.

Corydalis (Papaveraceae) BSWJ2951

stipulata

Perennial with fleshy roots. Producing rosettes of fern-like, bronzed tinted leaves. Dense spikes of yellow flowers are borne May-Oct. Height & spread 60cm. Our collection from the forests of Phulchoki C. Nepal.

Corylus (Corylaceae) GWJ9293

ferox

Deciduous shrub to small tree 3-4m tall in the wild, with arching branches of ovate-lanceolate long pointed sharply serrated leaves to 15cm long, from distinctly elongated silky buds. Bearing generous quantities of drooping pink male catkins to 8cm long winter to early spring, followed by their very distinct prickly clusters of nuts October to November. One of our collections from the Lachung Valley at 3000. Easily grown in full sun or part shade in a free drained soil with some moisture retention.

Corylus (Corylaceae) BSWJ11056

sieboldiana

A slow growing deciduous shrub to small tree eventually 5m tall in the wild. With long arching branches of orbicular-ovate doubly-serrated leaves which emerge with dark markings in their centres. Bearing yellowish pendant catkins on the bare twigs in mid-late winter, producing the pollen required by the bright red female flowers. Enabling them to bear clusters of their unusual nuts encased in the elongated husks which form a long tail. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. From our seed collection gathered from the deep valleys of the Hiroshima area of Japan in 2005.

Cotoneaster (Rosaceae) B&L12234

ganghobaensis

From seed we received from Ness Botanic Gardens (part of Liverpool University), from an exceptionally good form of this semi-evergreen species which is normally smothered in fruit every autumn. Where it has formed only small shrubs around a meter tall with an upright habit, bearing alternate small thick-textured rounded dark glossy green leaves to 14mm across. Seed for the original collection gathered from Gang Ho Ba, Lijiang, China, by Brickell and Leslie. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or shade fruiting better in sun. ers. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any type of drained fertile soil. **** ****** **** ***** **** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants when dormant, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Cotoneaster (Rosaceae) BSWJ3143

hualiensis

Forming a striking small tree to only 3 m tall on an upright narrow trunk where happened across this species, on a long abandoned logging trail the Japanese carved into the forests in the high mountains of north-eastern Taiwan. Named after the county we discovered it in, growing at the base of shady cliffs. Bearing almost rounded sizeable glossy leaves with conspicuously embossed venation, embellished with clusters of large bright red fruit by late summer. Easily grown in sun or shade in any type of fertile drained soil.

Cotoneaster (Rosaceae) BWJ8167

moupinensis

One of my collections gathered from a river bank in Baoxing, Sichuan China in 2000. Where it only formed a deciduous shrub to 1.5m tall bearing conspicuous bright red (autumn colour) elliptic-ovate leaves with conspicuously impressed venation above contrasting with the cymes of black fruit, held on greyish stems. Forming a small tree for us in our woodland garden to 3m tall, but capable of 5m in ideal conditions. Flowers held in corymbs of up to 25 pink cup-shaped flowers May to July. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any type of fertile drained soil.

Crocosmia (Iridaceae)

'Emily McKenzie'

Clump forming bulbous perennial with upright fan-shaped stems of vigorous foliage, bearing terminal arching spikes of open very large flowers, in rich orange splashed crimson within, Aug-Sept. Height 70cm. Well drained, humus rich soil in full sun.

Crocosmia (Iridaceae)

'Mrs. Geoffrey Howard'

Bulbous perennial with upright fan-shaped stems of vigorous foliage, bearing terminal arching spikes of tomato-red wide-open large flowers, Aug-Sept. Height 90cm. Well drained, humus rich soil in full sun.

Crocosmia (Iridaceae)

'Star of the East'

Originating in South Africa, this is a wonderful selection made from the many hybrids made since their introduction. With a rigidly upright stem to 80 cm bearing many slender leaves in a fan-like arrangement. Topped by a long spike of very large widely opening yellow-orange flowers August-Sept.. Easily grown in any drained, humus rich soil in full sun or part shade. Protect with a mulch in cold areas.

Croomia (Stemonaceae)

heterosepala

Superficially appearing like a Solomon's Seal, this perennial also has a slender creeping rhizomes. With smooth unbranched erect stems of oblong-ovate alternate ribbed leaves, to 15cm long. Bearing axillary yellowish-green flowers on slender pendant stems. Requires partial shade and moist well drained soil.

Crusea (Rubiaceae) BSWJ10254

coccinea 'Crûg Crimson'

From a family of plants seldom seen as hardy, a low growing creeping woodlander with fresh green small ribbed leaves on slender rooting reddish stems. Bearing bright red long trumpet-flowers in axillary clusters for months during the summer. One of our collections gathered from the high mountain forests of Oaxaca southern Mexico in 2004. Easily grown in full to part shade in a freely drained soil with some humus for moisture retention, or in a container.

Curculigo (Hypoxidaceae) HWJ683

crassifolia

A Vietnamese collection of this stunning foliage plant for a sunny dry or well drained site, even a large container as we have grown the plants for the last ten years. The sword-shaped leaves are pleated with an irresistible fealty indumentum on their undersides, as if that is not enough the scale is large a leaf can reach 1.5m long. In the wild the tight rosettes squeeze themselves into tight nooks on cliffs in either sun or shade, hinting on how drought resistant they are.

Curculigo (Hypoxidaceae) BSWJ2318

crassifolia

Without doubt a stunning foliage plant for a sunny dry or well drained site, even a large container as we have grown the plants for the last ten years. The broadly sword-shaped leaves are pleated with an irresistible textured fealty indumentum on their undersides, as if that were not enough the scale is large a leaf can reach 1.5m long. In the wild the tight rosettes squeeze themselves into tight nooks on cliffs in either sun or shade, hinting on how drought resistant they are. Introduced from one of our collections from the foothills of the Himalayas in northern India gathered in 1994.

Cyclea (Menispermaceae) KWJ12157

polypetala

A semi-evergreen twining climber, which I collected seed of from a congested mass of slender stems 3m tall, scrambling over large boulders on the open limestone mountainside in northern Vietnam in 2007. A very distinct species with peltate (umbrella-like with stalk in centre) young foliage maturing to large leathery caudate glossy leaves. Bearing large panicles of individually small flowers, from April in the wild followed by late summer an abundance of black grape-like fruit, with the classic horseshoe-shaped seed, lending it the vernacular name of moon-seed. Best grown in a fertile drained soil in sun or light shade, protecting the root from severe frost.

Cystopteris (Athyriaceae) BSWJ6767

moupinensis

A charming little species we collected from the Tayuling area of Taiwan at 2660m. With a creeping very slender rhizome covered in ginger scale when young, bearing small triangular 3-4-pinnatifid fronds 30-50cm long, with round sori on the undersides in autumn. Easily grown in a leafy moisture retentive soil in full or part shade.

Dactylicapnos (Papaveraceae)

lichiangensis see ventii

As remarkable climbing species of Dicentra, possessing a more restrained habit to only 3m tall in cultivation for us and of a similar stature when we encountered it in the wild in a Northern Indian mountain forest. With its own distinct bronzy tinted foliage born on bright reddish tendrilled stems, bearing generous clusters of orange-suffused yellow locket-flowers produced through the summer into autumn, followed by decorative inflated reddish beaked seed pods. Syn. Dactylicapnos

Dactylicapnos (Papaveraceae)

macrocapnos

One of the best introductions of recent times from Nepal. A completely herbaceous climber, making annual growth of 7-10m, in a site sheltered from strong winds and late spring frosts. Flowers bright yellow June-Dec.

Dactylicapnos (Papaveraceae) WJC13793

scandens

An herbaceous climber, forming annual growth of 3-4m over small trees and shrubs, in the wild where we collected the seed in north-eastern Himalayas in the autumn of 2013. Bearing yellow locket shaped flowers June-July, followed by distinct inflated bullet-shaped purple seed pods hanging like grapes, backed by green-bronzy divided foliage. Easily grown in a site sheltered from strong winds, plant in shade growing into sun. Syn. Dicentra

Dactylicapnos (Papaveraceae) GWJ9438

scandens

A remarkably common plant in the area where we made this seed collection in Lava a remote protected area in Northern India at 2150m. Where it formed an herbaceous climber, making annual growth of 3-4m over small trees and shrubs. Bearing yellow locket-flowers June-July, followed by distinct inflated bullet-shaped purple seed pods hanging like grapes. Easily grown in a site sheltered from strong winds, plant in shade growing into sun. Syn. Dicentra scandens.

Dactylicapnos (Papaveraceae)

scandens f. thalictrifolia

A most unusual form of this completely herbaceous climbing species, which thrusts forth 3-4m of annual growth in late March-April. With distinctly narrowly leafleted much divided leaves and axillary clusters of pale yellow locket-shaped flowers June-Aug, followed by large bunches of inflated seed pods hanging like grapes. Easily grown in a site sheltered from strong winds and late spring frosts with adequate drainage. Syn. Dicentra

Dactylicapnos (Papaveraceae) WJC13786

ventii

A charming small climbing species distinct within this group of climbing dicentras due to its colouration of both flower and foliage. Easily accommodated due to its smaller stature of only up to 3m of annual growth in its orange translucent stems with twining tendrils to secure it along its way. The more rounded foliage on this species is more bronzy with the orange from the stems merging in. Meanwhile the locket shaped bright yellow flowers are held on slender reddish pedicells, the flowers transforming to inflated bullet-shaped orange seed capsules, late summer into autumn for us, from June in warmer areas. From one of our seed collections gathered from north-eastern Himalayas, in the autumn of 2013. Easily grown in a site sheltered from strong winds.

Dactylicapnos (Papaveraceae) GWJ9376

ventii

We encountered this remarkable climbing species in the mountain forests of the Singalila Ridge Northern India. Where it grew to only 3m tall, with its own distinctly bronzy tinted foliage born on bright reddish tendrilled stems. Bearing generous clusters of orange-suffused yellow locket-flowers produced through the summer into autumn, followed by distinct decorative inflated reddish beaked seed pods. Easily grown in well drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. Syn. Dicentra.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10208

aff. australis

One of our collections from the Tuxtla area of Southern Mexico in 2004 at 2150m. Here it frequently formed colonies of arching stems to 1m tall, with pinnately arranged elliptic fresh green leaflets and large lilac yellow eyed flowers 10cm across held in large branched inflorescences. Best in a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, protect the tuberous roots from severe frost.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10274

aff. australis

From one of our collections gathered as a cutting from the slopes of Volcán Pico de Orizaba Mexico in the autumn of 2004, at an altitude of 3100m. Where this species only formed a small plant to 30 cm tall (taller in gardens) growing just in the light shade of a shrub on a very steep bank, bearing trifoliate leaves and purple-lilac flowers 5 cm across. Best in a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, protect the tuberous roots from severe frost

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10229

aff. australis

From one of our seed collections gathered at the edge of the alpine forest near Ixtalan, Oaxaca southern Mexico in the autumn of 2004 at 2400m. Where this species had formed a small colony of plants only 50 cm tall in the starved conditions of a steep bank, with glabrous pinnately arranged elliptic leaflets and terminal seed heads, which have turned out to be purple-lilac ray flowers. Best in a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, protect the tuberous roots from severe frost.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10334

aff. purpusii

Forming a stunning perennial clump where collected this our highest gathering of this species at 3450m growing on the very steep slopes of Volcán de Santa Maria in Guatemala in 2004. A distinctly different looking perennial plant where we found them, with sturdy upright short stems to 1.5m tall, bearing opposite pairs of pinnate foliage and stunning large pale purple ray flowers from July on. For a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, best protected from severe frost.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10321

aff. purpusii

Distinctly different looking perennial plant where we found them growing on the very steep slopes of Volcán de Santa Maria in Guatemala in 2004. Forming stunning perennials clumps, with sturdy upright short stems to 1.5m tall. Bearing opposite pairs of pinnate foliage and stunning large pale purple ray flowers from July on. For a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, best protected from severe frost.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10389

australis

As we were so impressed with the qualities of this large flowering species on our first encounter, on small ledges during a vertical section of our climb up Volcán Zunil in Guatemala in 2001. We just had to return and collect seed in 2004, as our first attempt failed. Here it had formed a tentative colony of arching stems to less than 1m tall, with pinnately arranged elliptic fresh green leaflets and extraordinary large lilac yellow eyed flowers 10cm across. Best in a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, protect the tuberous roots from frost.COCCINEA 10229

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10358

australis

It has taken a second determined attempt at collecting this tuberous perennial to succeed. As we were so impressed with its qualities on our first encounter on small ledges during a vertical section of our climb up Volcán Zunil in Guatemala in 2001. Where it had formed a tentative colony of arching stems to less than 1m long, with pinnately arranged elliptic fresh green leaflets and extraordinary large lilac yellow eyed flowers 10cm across. Best in a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, protect the tuberous roots from frost.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10238

excelsa

Forming stunning perennial clumps of strongly upright almost bamboo-like purple bloomy stems to over 3m tall. With several opposite angled branches from shallowly cup-shaped nodes, in the upper parts. Bearing bronzy pinnate shortly hairy foliage with large lilac-pink ray flowers from July on. From a collection we found growing on the moist mountains to the east of Oaxaca southern Mexico in 2004 at over 2500m. For a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, best protected from severe frost, hardy for us in a field.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10233

excelsa 'Penelope Sky'

A stunning clump-forming perennial, where we found this species growing on the moist mountains to the east of Oaxaca southern Mexico in 2004 at around 2500m. Where it formed formidable clumps of strongly upright, almost bamboo-like bloomy stems to over 3m tall with several opposite branches from the shallowly cup-shaped nodes, in the upper parts bearing bronzy pinnate foliage and large lilac-purple ray flowers from July to frost. For a sunny warm spot in moist but drained fertile soil, best protected from severe frost, hardy for us in a field with a decent mulch. Named for our youngest granddaughter born April 1st 2009.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ8997

imperialis

A stunning perennial where we saw this plant in the wilds of the Guatemalan mountains. Thrusting sturdy upright, almost bamboo-like bloomy purple stems to 5m tall. Bearing wonderfully textured pinnate foliage and lilac or white single ray-flowers in succession from late summer. For a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, best protected from frost.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ14341

imperialis f. albiflora

Forming a remarkable clumping plant where we found this giant perennial species in its white flowered form. With robust bamboo-like green stems supporting the large compound textured foliage, complemented by terminal clusters of sizeable white flowers in this form from October till frost. A collection we gathered with enthusiasm, as on previous occasions we were too early for seed these had been plants to 7m tall. Although only half of that in this collection. On this occasion we were on our decent back towards Bogotá at 2760m, from a Paramo to the east of the city. For a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, best protected from frost.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ10240

pinnata

An impressive species with obvious horticultural merits when we first encountered this beauty growing at the edge of dense forest at 2700m near Ixtalan in southern Mexico in 2004. Where there was only a single plant in seed that had formed a small clump of arching stems to 1m tall, with pinnately arranged leaves to 30cm long and extraordinary purple yellow eyed flowers 8cm across. Best in a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, protect the tuberous roots from frost.

Dahlia (Asteraceae) BSWJ14340

white sp. from Colombia

From seed we collected from the edge of the Bogotá basin in January 2015 at 2800m. Where this white flowered species is relatively common, growing in large or small colonies along the road/track-sides. Forming pretty perennial clumps of strong upright almost bamboo-like bloomy stems to around 1.5m tall. With several opposite angled branches from shallowly cup-shaped nodes in the upper parts. Bearing compound large pale foliage with impressed venation and a continuous display of the white with palest violet ray flowers. For a sunny warm spot in moist but well drained soil, best protected from severe frost.

Danae (Ruscaceae)

racemosa

An elegant green stemmed small arching evergreen shrub originating from the Middle East, long used with cut flowers. Which we have grown trouble free for many years in the shade of tall bamboo. The slender stems are adorned by thick-textured but pliable small scale-like ovate-elongated glossy leaves and tiny green flowers which transform to orange-red berries by late summer, reularly for us. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil in part to full shade.

Daphne (Thymelaeaceae) BSWJ6983

arisanensis

An unusual evergreen woodland species which is endemic to the island of Taiwan, where we collected it in the autumn of 1999, from the forests of the Yushan area which is their highest mountain. At this altitude it only formed small bushy shrubs to 1m tall with small glossy leathery leaves to 5cm long, bearing terminal clusters of yellow green tinged flowers followed by orange fruit. Best grown in part shade in a well drained soil that has plenty of added humus to retain moisture.

Daphne (Thymelaeaceae) GWJ9436

bholua

Our mother plants are two seedlings we collected on our way down from Sandakphu in 2002 at 3120m near Molle. Which have grown together on our Mound garden for several years producing some good viable fruit resulting in these plants. Here they have formed branching shrubs to around 2m tall with small light green elliptic foliage, flowering most of the winter, large dark pink in bud opening paler. Best grown in shelter from cold winds in sun or bright shade, but most importantly in well drained soil that has some moisture retention. Ours thrive in a shallow rocky soil in bright partial shade.

Daphne (Thymelaeaceae) BSWJ8275

bholua from Vietnam

Originating from three seedlings we collected on Fansipan in 2000 at 2900m, that have grown together in one of our gardens for many years. Here they have formed branching shrubs to around 2m tall with small dark glossy green elliptic foliage, flowering mid-late winter, lilac in bud opening white. Producing some good viable fruit resulting in these plants. Best grown in shelter from cold winds in sun or bright shade, but most importantly in well drained soil that has some moisture retention. Ours thrive in a shallow rocky soil in bright shade.

Daphne (Thymelaeaceae)

retusa

Densely branched evergreen, rounded shrub with leathery, glossy leaves, notched at the tips. In late spring and early summer, deep purple buds open to clusters of fragrant, pink/white flowers. Full sun and well drained soil.

Daphne (Thymelaeaceae) DJHC98164

sp. from China

From second generation seed grown from one of Dan Hinkley's collections made near the Tibetan border with Yunnan in 1998 from over 3000m. In cultivation it forms a small dark glossy evergreen shrub mounding to 1.3m tall, bearing a continuation of clustered narrowly tubular creamy-white scented flowers throughout the summer, followed by a conspicuous display of plump orbicular orange-red fruit. Best grown in full sun in a well drained but moisture retentive soil.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) WWJ12020

aff. angustifolium

A distinct species with a confused identity, which ultimately may be a new species. Which forms a bushy shrub or small slender evergreen tree in the wild, with emerging shoots which are bronzy-red, maturing to dark green broadly elliptical round-ended leaves, glaucous-white below held on angled reddened stems (petioles). Bearing small male or female flowers, in late spring from the new leaf axils, later evolving to bloomy fruit on female plants. One of the last collections I gathered with Peter Wharton from the forest of Ban Khoang, northern Vietnam in 2007. Best grown in a sheltered position, in part shade with some overhead protection from late frosts in a moisture retentive drained soil.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11788

aff. longeracemosum

Form seed we gathered in 2006, from a small well branched tree to only 4m tall growing in the very north of Vietnam close to the Chinese border at close to 2000m. With small stout branches of large oblong to elliptic leaves almost white below, to 30 cm long on reddish petioles bearing an abundance of ellipsoidal black glossy fruit in long racemes. All somewhat smaller than we normally find in this species. Best grown in full sun with light overhead shade to protect from late frosts, in any type of fertile drained soil, sheltered from cold winds. ******* These are 30 litre pots (this system’s maximum is only 20 lt.)

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) CWJ12350

aff. teysmannii

I was puzzled along with our host botanist Chien-Fan by the identity of this species, since it is not listed as occurring in Taiwan. This old acquaintance we normally see in Japan growing in very exposed locations, particularly in coastal areas, where they are often encountered on dry exposed cliffs. Only forming a medium sized to small shrub with thick leathery oblong leaves, which emerge and retain a bronze colour for months. Flowers are born in the upper leaf axils in May followed on female plants with dark purple bloomy fruit. Best grown in a free draining soil in full sun to part shade sheltered from freezing winds. These are still to root through until spring of 2016, hence not suitable for planting outside until then.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) KWJ12244

chartaceum

A species we collected in the forests on Fansipan the highest mountain in northern Vietnam in 2007. Where it formed a small tree 7-8m tall, well branched with a broad outline, young branches red. Clothed in large oblong-elliptic acuminate thick textured leaves 20-25 x 6.5-9cm, dark green above with prominent veins impressed, glaucous white below. Held on long red petioles 3.5-5cm long, the colour extending along the mid rib of the leaves. Fruitescences short, peduncles 6cm, pedicells.7-2cm, fruit ellipsoid 1.5 x 1.2cm dark with recurved styles (no calyx). A stunning tree which we were unable to use the current epithet, until we proved its existence in The Himalayas during our 2013 expedition. Best grown in some shelter from cold winds mixed with large shrubs (edge of woodland).

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) KWJ12313

chartaceum

Forming a small tree 7-8m tall in the wild, well branched with a broad outline, young branches red. Clothed in large oblong-elliptic acuminate thick textured leaves 20-25 x 6.5-9cm, dark green above with prominent veins impressed, glaucous white below. Held on long red petioles 3.5-5cm long, the colour extending along the mid rib of the leaves. Fruitescences short, peduncles 6cm, pedicells.7-2cm, fruit ellipsoid 1.5 x 1.2cm dark with recurved styles (no calyx). From one of our collections in the forests on Fansipan the highest mountain in northern Vietnam in 2007. A stunning tree which we were unable to use the current epithet, until we proved its existence during our Himalayan 2013 expedition. Best grown in some shelter from cold winds mixed with large shrubs (edge of woodland).

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ7119

kengii

Only forming a small shrub to 2m tall where we found this new species to cultivation, in the wild forests of Northern Taiwan. Forming a valuable evergreen bushy, dense shrub with upright shoots and small leaves with undulating margins and sometimes shallowly lobed. Small flowers, appear in late spring in the axils of new growth, which in turn is bronzy in colour. Requires full sun in a warm spot in a good soil.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ8763

macropodum from Cheju-Dõ

Invaluable evergreen, bushy slow-growing large shrub-small tree, with stout blood-red young shoots and petioles bearing dark green leathery leaves, which emerge a coppery-red. Single sexed spikes of flowers appear in spring, from the axils of the previous year's leaves. Best grown in part to light shade in a moisture retentive soil. Height 6m. Spread 5m. Our own collection from Cheju S. Korea.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ12691

macropodum from Korea

A seed collection from our 2010 expedition to South Korea, where we found a recently fallen tree within the forest of Naejangsan. An area that proclaims that it is the northern-most outpost of this species on mainland Korea. Here it had formed an evergreen bushy small tree or large shrub. With stout shoots which when extending are a bright red in colour, bearing dark green narrowly obovate leaves glaucous to white in colour below, held on bright red stems (petioles). Small either all male or all female flowers, appear in late spring in the new leaf axils. Best grown in light shade to sun, which best mimics edge of forest, which would be its preferred aspect, in a moisture retentive soil. Height 6m. Spread 5m. Care should be taken not to alter the soil level (at least not upward).

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11489

macropodum from Yakushima

Although only forming dwarfed trees in their challenging natural habitat, on the high mountains of Yakushima, they immediately caught our eyes with their bright red petioles. This fine collection ought to grow into bushy well branched evergreen shrubs with dark green leathery leaves, which emerge a coppery-red, combining with the plentiful panicles of emerging red individually small flowers to give an unbeatable display. A very hardy species appreciating a bit of overhead protection from late frosts, lime tolerant.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11515

macropodum from Yakushima

Although only forming dwarfed trees in their challenging natural habitat, on the high mountains of Yakushima, they immediately caught our eyes with their bright red petioles. This fine collection ought to grow into bushy well branched evergreen shrubs with dark green leathery leaves, which emerge a coppery-red, combining with the plentiful panicles of emerging red individually small flowers to give an unbeatable display. A very hardy species appreciating a bit of overhead protection from late frosts, lime tolerant.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae)

macropodum v. humile

A very rare species/variety in cultivation found only in some northern areas of Japan. A bushy and dense in habit slow growing evergreen small sized shrub, bearing dark green glossy leaves 10-15cm long, which emerge bronzy-orange-red in spring. On stout dark red shoots, with the small either male or female flowers in late spring. Best in part shade in a moisture retentive fertile soil. Height to 1.5m. Spread 1.5m.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11232

macropodum v. humile

Our latest collection of this very rare species in cultivation found only in some northern areas of Japan. A bushy and dense in habit slow growing evergreen small sized shrub, bearing dark green glossy leaves 10-15cm long. Which emerge bronzy-orange-red in spring, on stout dark red shoots, with small either male or female flowers in late spring. Best grown in part to light shade in a moisture retentive soil. Height to 1.5m. Spread 1.5m.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11232

macropodum v. humile female

Our latest collection of this very rare species in cultivation found only in some northern areas of Japan. A bushy and dense in habit slow growing evergreen small sized shrub, bearing dark green glossy leaves 10-15cm long. Which emerge bronzy-orange-red in spring, on stout dark red shoots, with small female flowers in late spring followed by blue-black fruit when pollinated. Best grown in part to light shade in a moisture retentive soil. Height to 1.5m. Spread 1.5m.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11232

macropodum v. humile male

Very rare species in cultivation found only in some northern areas of Japan. A bushy and dense in habit slow growing evergreen small sized shrub, bearing dark green glossy leaves 10-15cm long, which emerge bronzy-orange-red in spring. On stout dark red shoots, with the small male flowers in late spring. Requires full sun and moist soil. Height to 1.5m. Spread 1.5m.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11744

majus

A new species to cultivation from the restricted frontier area bordering with China in northern Vietnam. Which we collected the rounded blue-black fruit held in long pendant panicles, in the autumn of 2006. From a small well branched tree 10m tall growing at 1800m altitude, with large leathery leaves (30 × 7cm) deeply impressed with venation above held on bright red petioles. Best grown in shelter from freezing winds in full sun to light shade in a moisture retentive soil that has good drainage, hardiness unknown.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ6872

oldhamii

Only forming a small shrub to 2m tall, where we found this new species to cultivation, in the wild forests of North-eastern Taiwan. Forming a striking evergreen bushy, dense shrub with upright shoots and small leaves with undulating margins and sometimes shallowly lobed. Small flowers, appear in late spring in the axils of new growth, which in turn is bronzy in colour. Requires full sun in a warm spot in a drained fertile soil.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) CWJ12351

oldhamii

Resulting from my collection from the very north of Taiwan in the winter of 2007 with Finlay Colley and Dan Hinkley. Where this rare species had formed medium to large sized shrubs in the cool air of the steep mountain side. Forming a striking evergreen bushy densely branched shrub with upright shoots and small leaves with undulating margins sometimes shallowly lobed in juvenility. Small flowers, appear in late spring in the axils of the new growth, which in turn is conspicuously bronzy in colour. Requires full sun in a warm spot in a drained fertile soil.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ9755

paxianum

An exceptionally rare species in cultivation from the upland area of Dalat in southern Vietnam, where this species was very conspicuous with its bronzy foliage. From seed we collected at the highest peak, from a small exposed tree to only 3m tall bearing only small dark green glossy leaves to only 8 cm long on bright red petioles in these conditions. Still retaining some ripe fruit when we were there in the autumn of 2003, unusual as it had just finished flowering and bearing the embryos of the next fruit. Best grown is some shelter ideally with some overhead protection from late frosts.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) RWJ9836

pentandrum

From our own seed collection from Taroko north-eastern Taiwan, gathered in 2003. Forming a stunning evergreen bushy, dense shrub-small tree, with stout shoots and glaucous blue-green leaves, white on the undersides. Which emerge a deep bronze to mahogany red in May. Small red stemmed flowers, appear in late spring in the red axils of the colourful new growth. Best grown in part shade with some overhead protection (edge of woodland) in a humus rich soil. Height 6m. Spread 4m.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) CWJ12393

pentandrum

From our own seed collection in the winter of 2007, gathered with Dan Hinkley and Finlay Colley, from a mountain forest close to Yushan the highest mountain in Taiwan. Forming a stunning evergreen bushy densely branched shrub or small tree, with stout shoots and glaucous blue-green paddle-shaped leathery leaves. Innumerable clusters of small flowers appear in the terminal axils of the bronzy new growth in late spring. These mature to black glossy ellipsoid fruit on long stalks on female plants when pollinated. Similar in habit to D. macropodum but with a bronzy hue. Best grown in part shade with some overhead protection (edge of woodland) in a humus rich, but drained soil. Height 6m. Spread 4m.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ6809

pentandrum

From our own seed collection from Taroko north-eastern Taiwan. Forming tall evergreen trees to 10m, bearing branches of large dark lustrous green leaves on red petioles, weighted down by generous axillary drupes of glossy black grape-like fruit on bright red pedicells. Which we collected from the surrounding undergrowth, where the monkeys had thrown them.Best grown in part shade with some overhead protection (edge of woodland) in a humus rich soil. Height 6m. Spread 4m.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ3805

pentandrum

Evergreen bushy shrub-small tree, with stout shoots which extending a bright red in colour, bearing dark green narrowly obovate leaves glaucous to white in colour below, held on bright red stems (petioles). Small flowers, appear in late spring in the new leaf axils. Best grown in part shade with some overhead protection (edge of woodland) in a humus rich soil. Height 6m. Spread 4m. Our own collection from Yung Yang Lake Northern Taiwan. The identification of this species may be in question.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11110

teysmannii

Invaluable evergreen shrubs which are rarely seen in cultivation. Growing in very exposed locations in the wild, particularly in coastal areas, where they are often encountered on dry exposed cliffs. Only forming a medium sized to small shrub with thick leathery oblong leaves, which emerge and retain a bronze colour for months. Flowers are born in the upper leaf axils in May followed on female plants with dark purple bloomy fruit. Best grown in a free draining soil in full sun to part shade sheltered from freezing winds.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11358

teysmannii

From one of our collections from the exposed sea cliffs of the Wakayama Prefecture Japan gathered in 2006, on our way south, of an invaluable evergreen shrub which is rarely seen in cultivation. Where it only formed a medium sized to small shrub with thick leathery oblong leaves, which emerge and retain a bronze colour for months, with an abundance of ellipsoidal fruit still very green. The flowers are born in the upper leaf axils in May followed on female plants with dark purple bloomy fruit. Best grown in a free draining soil in full sun to part shade sheltered from freezing winds.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11112

teysmannii

Invaluable evergreen shrubs which are rarely seen in cultivation. Growing in very exposed locations in the wild, particularly in coastal areas, where they are often encountered on dry exposed cliffs. Only forming a medium sized to small shrub with thick leathery oblong leaves, which emerge deep red slowly metamorphosing bronze over months. Flowers are born in the upper leaf axils in May followed on female plants with dark purple bloomy fruit. Best grown in a free draining soil in full sun to part shade sheltered from freezing winds.

Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) BSWJ11510

teysmannii

An invaluable evergreen shrub which is rarely seen in cultivation, that forms a medium sized to small shrub with thick leathery oblong leaves, which emerge red slowly transforming through shades of bronze over months. The flowers are born in the upper leaf axils in May followed on female plants with dark purple bloomy ellipsoidal fruit. From one of our collections from the exposed sea cliffs on the west coast of Yakushima Japan gathered in 2006. Best grown in a free draining soil in full sun to part shade sheltered from freezing winds.

Darmera (Saxifragaceae)

peltata

Spreading, perennial with large, rounded leaves. Has clusters of white or pale pink flowers in spring on white haired stems before the foliage appears. Height 1-1.2m. Spread 60cm. Sun or shade and moist soil. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Davallia (Davalliaceae) BSWJ4448

mariesii

Originating from a small piece of branching rhizome covered in silvery brown hair (scales), that we collected in 1997on the island of Cheju-Dõ, a large island to the south of mainland Korea. Where it grew as an epiphyte forming dense patches of long-creeping rhizomes with slender scaly stems (stipes) to 13cm long bearing loosely ovate-triangular in outline finely dissected fronds to 20 × 15cm, of a parchment texture. Best grown in moist, but drained leafmould in full to light shade where the rhizomes can creep along the surface.

Debregeasia (Ulmaceae) BSWJ11686

longifolia

A most unusual medium sized shrub or small tree in the wild to 4m, which is an unlikely decorative woody member of the nettle family (Urticaceae). The semi-evergreen slender lance-shaped foliage to 23cm long may fool people even though the texture is rough, but the orange mulberry-like fruit held in dense clusters along the stems will be guaranteed to fox anyone. Sue's collection from a remote area of northern Vietnam next to the Chinese border, collected in 2006. Easily grown in most types of fertile drained soils, best grown in sun or light shade, with some protection from freezing winds.

Decaisnea (Lardizabalaceae) BWJ8070

fargesii

An unusual and distinct shrub with an open habit, forming strongly upright growth bearing large pinnate leaves to 1m long. With long racemes of yellow-green flowers followed by remarkable broad-bean like metallic-blue seed pods, filled with a translucent flesh surrounding the black seed. For full sun to part shade in a moist but well drained soil. My collection from Emei Shan, China.

Decaisnea (Lardizabalaceae) WJC13740

insignis

An unexpected find in the north-east Himalayas in the autumn of 2013 at around 2900m. A distinct shrub with an open habit, forming slender strongly upright growth to 2.2m tall where it grew, bearing large pinnate leaves to 2m long composed of as many as 23 leaflets. With long racemes of yellow-green flowers around June, followed by around September on by remarkable broad-bean like yellow fruit usually held in threes and curling like a fist, filled with a translucent flesh surrounding the black seed. For full sun to part shade in a moist but well drained soil. Recorded as being tender, which is unlikely in this case growing at its upper limit.

Decumaria (Hydrangeaceae)

barbara

A North American self clinging semi-evergreen, aerial-rooting woody climber to 9m. The fragrant small creamy-white flowers are carried in rounded corymbs in June-July. Sheltered sun-shade in any humus enriched soil.

Decumaria (Hydrangeaceae)

sinensis

A small evergreen aerial rooting climber related to hydrangeas from China, to only 5m tall. With small glossy obovate dark green leaves, held close to the stems which are hidden by the sheer quantity of reputedly honey-scented white tinged green flowers, held in axillary corymbs in May-June. Sun or part shade in any humus enriched soil, best sheltered from cold winds.

Deinanthe (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5551

bifida

Encountered on one of our trecks through the alpine forest on Mt. Sanjõgatake, Central Honshu, Japan. Our collection of a choice clump-forming woodland perennial best grown in a cool shady site in a leafy soil, protected from strong winds. The upright unbranched stems carry large rounded rugose opposite pairs of leaves to 20cm long, which are deeply notched at their ends. With showy terminal corymbs of white nodding flowers.

Deinanthe (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5655

bifida

Our collection from a coniferous forest on Honshu, Japan. A choice clump-forming woodland perennial for a cool shady site in a leafy soil, protected from wind. The large rugose opposite pairs of leaves are split at their ends (bifid). While the rounded flowers are fleshy, nodding white in small clusters July-August.

Deinanthe (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5436

bifida

Our collection from a coniferous forest on Honshu, Japan. A choice clump-forming woodland perennial for a cool shady site in a leafy soil, protect from wind. The large rugose opposite pairs of leaves are notched at their ends. Flowers are fleshy, nodding white in small clusters.

Deinanthe (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5012

bifida 'Pink-Kii'

Truly outstanding and a notable departure from the normally white-flowered form of this species. Bearing terminal corymbs of nodding pristinely white flowers opening from deep pink buds, while the sepals of each flower retain the pinkish cast. The upright unbranched stems carry large rounded rugose opposite pairs of leaves to 20cm long, which are deeply notched at their ends. Named by Dan Hinkley of Heronswood Nursery, USA. For this collection we made together from the Kii Peninsular in Japan in 1997. A choice clump-forming woodland perennial best grown in a cool shady site in a leafy moisture retentive soil, best protected from drying winds.

Deinanthe (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5655

bifida 'Pink-Shi'

Our collection from a steep forest of Chamecyprys on the island of Shikoku, Japan. A choice clump-forming woodland perennial best grown in a cool shady site in a leafy soil, protected from strong winds. The upright unbranched stems carry large rounded rugose opposite pairs of leaves to 20cm long, which are deeply notched at their ends. With showy terminal corymbs of white nodding flowers encased in this cultivar by pink sepals and subtended by pink sterile outer flowers.

Deinanthe (Hydrangeaceae)

caerulea

A much sought after and fabled, choice clump-forming perennial for a moist, cool and shady site in a leafy acidic soil, protect from drying winds. Forming clumps of shortly arching stems to 40cm, bearing rounded hairy leaves, below the pale blue nodding, fleshy flowers. China.

Deinanthe (Hydrangeaceae)

caerulea x bifida 'Blue Blush'

A cultivar we have reared from seed of D. caerulea having been pollinated by D. bifida, resulting in an uniform small batch of plants. The seedlings are intermediate in character with some hybrid vigour causing them to be stronger plants than the normal D. caerulea, but with paler foliage. The flowers also differ, again slightly larger white flowers, flushed with blue, the overall appearance being pale blue. Best grown in a cool shady site in a leafy soil, protected from strong winds.

Delphinium (Ranunculaceae) BWJ7867

aff. sutchuenense

From my collection on the Cangshan, China at 2450m, growing on mountain slopes along streams and forests. A perennial species with tuberous roots forming clumps of palmate leaves, with branched flowering stems of bright-blue flowers to 1.5m tall. Part shade in any drained soil.

Delphinium (Ranunculaceae) HWJK2299

glaciale

A most unusual high altitude pubescent species we collected along with Dan Hinkley on our trek towards Topke Gola Eastern Nepal in 2002, at 3800m. Forming small colonies of procumbent hairy stems to 30cm long with deeply divided and toothed trilobed leaves. Bearing inflated papery textured mauvish-blue spurred flowers in small clusters. Best grown in a cool spot in good light, in a well drained soil that retains some moisture.

Dendropanax (Araliaceae) FMWJ13274

cf. kwangsiensis

From a group of valuable small evergreen trees, intriguing yet inexplicably absent from cultivation in the UK. This collection was gathered from the Hoang Lien Mountains in northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2011. It is easily maintained as a shrub if preferable to retain a more juvenile form. With sturdy stems bearing thick-textured leathery dark-green tri-lobed juvenile leaves or elliptic adult/flowering foliage to 20cm long. Bearing terminal inflorescences of yellowish green small flowers in round umbels followed by black round fruit on long slender pedicells. Easily grown in most fertile soils in full sun or part shade, best out of freezing winds. Also known as ivy trees, as they shares some of their attributes regarding flowering and fruiting.

Dendropanax (Araliaceae) BSWJ12988

trifidus

Inexplicably absent from cultivation in the UK. A valuable small evergreen tree, easily maintained as a shrub if preferable. With sturdy stems bearing thick-textured leathery dark-green tri-lobed juvenile leaves or rhombic-ovate adult foliage to 12cm long. Bearing terminal inflorescences of yellowish green small flowers in umbels followed by black round fruit. Easily grown in most fertile soils in full sun or part shade, best out of freezing winds.

Desfontainia (Loganiaceae)

spinosa 'Harold Comber'

Evergreen shrub with holly-like dark green leaves. Tubular, red orange flowers larger than the type, tipped with yellow are borne from summer-autumn. Requires partial shade and moist acidic soil. Height & spread 1.8x1.7m.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BWJ7728

aff. monbeigii

A small very hardy deciduous species bearing May-June dense axially and terminal clusters of large white flowers. Forming a deciduous shrub to 2m tall, with strongly arching branches of small ovate opposite leaves greyish below, From seed I collected at 3200m near Zhongdian China. Easily grown in sun or part shade in a free drained soil.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) HWJK2180

bhutanensis

One of our seed collections gathered from the forest edge as we left the Arun River on our hike towards Thudam on the Tibetan border of eastern Nepal with Dan Hinkley et al in 2002 at 2100m. Where this arching deciduous shrub only attained a height of 1.7m bearing broadly lanceolate leaves to 4cm long on long branches. With sizeable pale flowers edged purple-pink in congested axillary clusters produced before or with the foliage April-June. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or part shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BWJ8007

calycosa

From Longzhoushan, Sichuan, a small deciduous shrub to 3m tall, where I collected it growing on an open rocky mountainside. With small ovate to lanceolate thin textured leaves with small stellate hairs on the undersides and on the reddish young stems. Bearing terminal corymbose cymes comprising of 3-12 pink flowers. For any type of well drained soil in sun or part shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ6917

cordatula

A recently discovered species, which we collected from Wushe in the Central Mountains of Taiwan in the winter of 1999. Forming in time a small to medium sized shrub bearing opposite golden brown stellately haired cordate leaves, which are thick textured and persistent. Bearing many flowered terminal and axillary panicles of star to funnel-shaped pink flowers over a long period in summer. Best grown in full sun to light shade in a well drained fertile soil with shelter from freezing winds.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ3720

cordatula

Originating from our collection gathered in the autumn of 1996, from Wushe in the Central Mountains of Taiwan, a recently discovered species. Forming in time a medium sized shrub bearing opposite golden brown stellately haired cordate leaves, which are thick textured and possibly persistent. Bearing many flowered long pendant terminal panicles of funnel-star-shaped palest pink flowers over a long period in summer. Requiring a position in full sun with shelter from freezing winds.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) GWJ9339

corymbosa

A slender arching deciduous shrub only attaining a height of 2m where we gathered the seed just north of Lachen in Eastern Sikkim in 2002, with Sally Goddard at 2700m. Where it had born small ovate opposite leaves 5-12cm long on lateral branches bearing fragrant white flowers in generous axillary and terminal cymes June to July. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or shade. Previously offered as D. compacta. *** **** *** ***** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) GWJ9202

corymbosa

From one of our seed collections gathered from the Lachen valley in Eastern Sikkim in 2002 with Sally Goddard at 2700m. Where this slender arching deciduous shrub only attained a height of 2m bearing small ovate opposite leaves 5-12cm long on lateral branches bearing fragrant white flowers in generous axillary and terminal cymes June to July. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or shade. Previously offered as D. compacta.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) GWJ9203

corymbosa

We were convinced that this was another species, until it flowered in our trials field. Forming an impressive arching deciduous shrub to a height of 2m bearing small ovate opposite leaves 5-12cm long on lateral branches, bearing fragrant white flowers in what appeared to be huge terminal dense panicles 1m long, but were comprised of many congested cymes June to July. Where we gathered this seed collection from the Lachen valley in Eastern Sikkim in 2002 with Sally Goddard at 2700m. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or shade. Previously offered as D. compacta.*** **** *******This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ10969

crenata

From one of our seed collections gathered in the mountains of Niigata north western Japan, when we were driven south by the incoming snows in the autumn of 2005. A deciduous shrub bearing a mass of congested axillary racemes of white flowers from May to July, on slender arching branches of opposite finely toothed leaves (crenate), with few white stellate (starry) hairs below. Height to 3m. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or part shade. Hardy to -20 C. The name of this species has long been confused with D. scabra since its original introduction in the early 19th century. ***** **** ***** **** **** **** *** This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8886

crenata

A deciduous shrub from one of our collections in the mountains of Hirotani, Kyushu, Japan in 2001. Bearing a mass of congested axillary racemes of white flowers from May to July, on slender arching branches of opposite finely toothed leaves (crenate), with few white stellate hairs below. Height to 3m. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or part shade. Hardy to -20 C. The name of this species has long been confused with D. scabra since its original introduction in the early 19th century.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8896

crenata

Deciduous medium-sized shrub to 3m tall where we collected seed on the mountains of the Kinki District Japan, at 1200m in 2001. Bearing masses of terminal and axillary racemes of funnel-shaped white flowers from May to July. On slender branches of small opposite finely toothed leaves, with white stellate hairs below. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or part shade. ******************************This plant is only supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8924

crenata

A deciduous medium-sized shrub to 3m tall where we collected seed on the mountains of the Kinki District, Japan at 800m in 2001. Bearing many-flowered terminal panicles of cupped star-shaped white flowers from April-June. On slender branches of opposite orbicular-ovate serrulate leaves densely hairy below. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any fertile free drained soil.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ5805

crenata v. heterotricha

Deciduous shrub from one of our collections in the high mountains of Northern Shikoku, Japan at 1500m in 1998. Bearing simple or basely branched terminal and axillary congested racemes of sizeable white flowers from May to July. Which weigh down the slender branches of opposite finely toothed leaves, with spreading hairs below. Height 3m. Thrives in any reasonable soil in sun or part shade. Hardy to -20 C.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8879

crenata v. heterotricha

Our collection from the mountains of Northern Kyushu, Japan at 600m in 2001, where this scarce variety of this deciduous shrub only grew to 1.5m tall, but a bit taller in cultivation. Bearing masses of terminal and axillary racemes of funnel-shaped white flowers from May to July, on slender branches of opposite finely toothed leaves, with spreading hairs below on this variety. Easily grown in any reasonable fertile soil with a little humus to retain some moisture, in either full sun or part shade. ******************************As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ11184

crenata v. nakaiana

Forming a medium sized shrub in the wild, where we collected the seed of this rare variety, on the Yamazumi Pass high up in the mountains of Shizuoka Japan in the autumn of 2005. With smaller leaves than the typical phase complimented by albeit smaller white flowers May-June, but more numerous. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil preferably with a bit of humus to hold moisture, in either full sun or part shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae)

discolor 'Major'

An old cultivar which was already in our garden when we moved to Crûg, considered to be the best form of this Chinese species introduced by Ernest Wilson in 1901. Only forming a dainty small arching shrub with small ovate leaves, which produces an abundance of 2-2.5 cm wide white flowers that are pink tinted on the outsides in May-June. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or part shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8427

glabrata

A small slender shrub to only 1.5m tall, when we collected the seed for this rare species. With arching branched stems bearing elliptic serrulate thin textured leaves, bearing terminal congested cymes of open star-shaped white flowers from April-June. From the mountainous area of Sõraksan in the north-east of South Korea, where it grew on a steep north facing slope amongst strewn boulders. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any fertile free drained soil.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BWJ7742

glomeruliflora

A small species I collected seed of at 2900m in Yunnan China. Forming a deciduous shrub to 2m tall, with arching branches of small opposite leaves greyish below. Bearing May-June congested clusters of pale pink starry flowers, best in sun or part shade in a free drained soil.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8927

gracilis

Only forming a small deciduous shrub to 1.5m tall where we collected seed on the mountains of the Kinki District, Japan in 2001. Bearing terminal congested branched racemes of star-shaped white flowers from April-June, on slender branches of ovate to broadly lanceolate toothed leaves slightly hairy below. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any fertile free drained soil.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ11438

gracilis v. ogatae

A chance find of this little known gem that never fails to smother itself with small flowers every summer. It differs from our previous collection of this variety in producing its mass of flowers that are a contrasting pink in bud. This variety does not appear to be recorded in British horticulture for producing flowers in vast numbers over a longer period than the type species from May to July, all be it as smaller flowers. Our collection from the mountains of central Kyushu, Japan in 2006, where this deciduous small shrub only grew to 1.5m tall, bearing terminal and axillary congested panicles of flowers on slender branches of opposite finely toothed leaves, with few white stellate hairs below. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or part shade. Hardy to -20 C.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8911

gracilis v. ogatae

Our collection from the mountains of Northern Kyushu, Japan in 2001, where this deciduous small shrub only grew to 1.5m tall along a steam within a forest. A deciduous shrub bearing terminal and axillary congested panicles of small white flowers in profusion from May to July. On slender branches of opposite finely toothed leaves, with few white stellate hairs below. Easily grown in any reasonable soil in sun or part shade. Hardy to -20 C.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ11567

maximowicziana

One of our last collections from Japan in 2006, although we had been on the lookout throughout. A distinct species with almost white undersides to the slender opposite leaves, the reason I had a crick in my neck after looking under so many for a month. Found close to Kochi on Shikoku island, where the slender stems to 1.3m long, had been laden with the cupped white flowers in profusion from May to July growing laxly from steep dry sunny banks. Easily grown in any type of well drained fertile soil in full sun to light shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8592

paniculata

A small delicate looking species for us so far, although up to 2m tall in the wild with arching stems and peeling bark where we collected the seed in the cold Sobaeksan area of South Korea in the autumn of 2001. Bearing large panicles of small white flowers in profusion May-July, setting this species well apart from others. Easily grown in any type of fertile soil preferably with a bit of humus to hold moisture, in either full sun or part shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8690

parviflora v. amurensis

One of our seed collections from Taebaeksan one of the coldest locations we have collected from at this elevation of 1,500m, in the mountains of central South Korea. A slender deciduous shrub to 2m tall with ovate-acuminate pairs of opposite leaves, with small stellate hairs on their undersides (which differ in shape on this variety). Bearing late March to June flat topped corymbs of fresh white outwardly facing open rounded flowers fewer in number, but larger in this variety. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or shade. We find this species particularly useful in a deciduous woodland as it flowers so early. **** **** **** ***** **** **** *** These plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8478

parviflora v. barbinervis

From seed we collected from the Chiaksan Area of central South Korea in 2001, from an area that experiences very cold but dry winters. A small slender deciduous shrub to 2m tall, with ovate-acuminate pairs of opposite leaves, with small stellate hairs on their undersides. Bearing in summer flat topped corymbs of fresh white up turned open rounded flowers. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in sun or shade. ******* ********** ************* As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8588

prunifolia

A small slender shrub to only 1m high, when we collected the seed for this rare species. With arching well branched stems bearing small elliptic leaves, which were hairy along the veins below and on the few axillary seed capsules, which had replaced the unusual large funnel-shaped white flowers April-May. From the Sobaeksan area in the rugged mountainous interior of South Korea, where it grew on a steep north facing slope amongst strewn boulders. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any fertile free drained soil. Previously sold as D. coreana.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ3948

pulchra

A deciduous sometimes semi-evergreen shrub originating from one of our seed collections in 1996, gathered from Mount Pulag the highest mountain on the island of Luzon, Philippines, at around 2,700m. A variable shrub that in time forms a large shrub with decorative exfoliating bark, but can quite easily be kept smaller if desired. Bearing semi-evergreen small in this form opposite grey fealty ovoid pointed leaves, with many flowered terminal panicles of funnel shaped pure white flowers (likened to lily-of the valley by Roy Lancaster) over a long period in summer. Shelter from freezing winds in any type of fertile drained soil, in full sun or light shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ3870

pulchra

Deciduous sometimes semi-evergreen shrub from our collection in the mountains of N. Luzon, Philippines. Making in time a large shrub bearing opposite grey fealty ovoid pointed leaves (small in this form). Bearing many flowered terminal panicles of funnel shaped pure white flowers over a long period summer on. Shelter from cold winds. **** **** **** **** **** **** **** ** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ6908

pulchra

Selected for having purple venation on its grey pointed leaves, which can indicate colouring in the flowers. Sometimes semi-evergreen shrub to 3m, from our collection in the Long-Jen Valley, Taiwan. Bearing many flowered terminal panicles of funnel shaped white sometimes pink tinged flowers May-July. Shelter from cold winds.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ1738

pulchra

From one of our seed collection gathered in the high mountain forest of Taipingshan in the north of Taiwan, in 1993 at 2,000m, where we had to endure the dreadful food and day time temperatures of 4C with non stop rain. A variable shrub that in time forms a large shrub with decorative exfoliating bark, but can quite easily be kept smaller if desired. That is semi-evergreen bearing opposite grey-green ovoid pointed leaves in this form. Bearing many flowered terminal panicles of funnel shaped pure white flowers (likened to lily-of the valley by Roy Lancaster) over a long period in summer. Shelter from freezing winds in any type of fertile drained soil, in full sun or light shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ1905

pulchra

Originating from our seed collection gathered in the relatively sheltered valley in the north of Taiwan, Wuling Farm at 1750m, where we were initially surprised by the heavy frosts in the autumn of 1993. A variable shrub that in time forms a large shrub with decorative exfoliating bark, but can quite easily be kept smaller if desired. That is semi-evergreen bearing opposite grey-green ovoid pointed leaves that are larger in this form. Bearing many flowered terminal panicles of funnel shaped pure white flowers (likened to lily-of the valley by Roy Lancaster) over a long period in summer. Shelter from freezing winds in any type of fertile drained soil, in full sun or light shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) CWJ12386

pulchra

From my highest elevation seed collection of this species, gathered on my 2007 expedition to Taiwan's highest mountain, Yushan at 2900m. A variable shrub that in time can form a large shrub with decorative exfoliating bark, but can quite easily be kept smaller if desired. That is sometimes semi-evergreen, bearing opposite grey-green ovoid pointed leaves, bearing many flowered terminal panicles of funnel shaped pure white flowers (likened to lily-of the valley by Roy Lancaster) over a long period in summer. Shelter from freezing winds in any type of fertile drained soil, in full sun or light shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BWJ7859

purpurascens

From seed I collected on the Cangshan, Yunnan China, growing amongst strewn boulders on a steep valley floor, not far from a roaring river. Where it formed a small arching deciduous shrub to only 2m tall. With reddish branches of small ovate opposite finely serrated leaves, bearing May-June dense axially clusters of large shell pink star-shaped flowers. Easily grown in sun or part shade in any fertile free drained soil.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ11127

scabra

A new species to cultivation although the name has been mis used for D. crenata for nearly 200 years. A small-medium deciduous species with ovate to orbicular bristly parchment textured opposite leaves, with the first pair below the inflorescence being almost fused at their bases. Bearing terminal and axillary panicles of white widely open star-shaped flowers with conspicuous protruding stamen April-June. From our seed collection gathered from the Mt. Asõ area of Kyushu Japan in 2005. Easily grown in full sun to part shade in any type of fertile well drained soil.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ11168

scabra

From our seed collection gathered from Mt. Kanmuriyama on the island of Shikoku, Japan in 2005. A small-medium sized deciduous species with ovate to orbicular bristly parchment textured opposite leaves, with the first pair below the inflorescence being almost fused at their bases. Bearing terminal and axillary panicles of white widely open star-shaped flowers with conspicuous protruding stamen April-June. A new species to cultivation although the name has been mis used for D. crenata for nearly 200 years. Easily grown in full sun to part shade in any type of fertile well drained soil. ****** ********* ************ As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculatin

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) CWJ12443

taiwanensis

From a seed collection gathered in 2007, from an old logging trail that runs through the Central Mountains of Taiwan at high altitude. A slender deciduous species with narrowly elliptic serrated leaves, distinct with the 5-8 armed stellate hairs below. With terminal slender inflorescences which would have borne the white cupped flowers in summer. Grown in our windswept stock field for several very cold winters, where they have flowered every year. Easily grown in any type of drained fertile soil in full sun or part shade.

Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) CWJ12459

taiwanensis

Only forming a slender deciduous shrub where I collected this seed in the mountain forest of Hsinchu, in the cool north of Taiwan, in 2007 with Finlay Colley. To 1.5m tall with many slender branches of narrow sharp ended grey green leaves to 7.5 cm long terminating in slender inflorescences which would have borne the white cupped flowers in summer. Best grown in full sun to light shade in a drained fertile soil out of cold winds. ********* ********** *********** As we have sold out of all our containerised stock of this plant, these plants are supplied as open ground/bare-rooted plants, the pot size given is for the purpose of calculating carriage only.

Dicentra (Papaveraceae)

'Langtrees'

Syn. 'Pearl Drops', perennial with attractive broad silver-grey foliage. Arching sprays of pendent, heart shaped cream tipped pink flowers, from spring to late summer. Height 45cm. Spread 60cm. Requires partial shade-sun and drained soil.

Dicentra (Papaveraceae)

formosa alba

Perennial producing in spring-summer slender, arching sprays of pendant, heart shaped, white flowers above finely cut, grey-green leaves. Height 45cm. Spread 30cm. Sun-shade with moist but well drained soil.

Dicentra (Papaveraceae)

formosa ssp. oregona

Strong growing perennial producing in spring-summer slender, arching sprays of pendant, heart shaped, pale pink flowers above finely cut, grey-green leaves. Height 45cm. Spread 30cm. Sun-shade with moist but well drained soil.

Dicentra (Papaveraceae)

lichiangensis see D. ventii

As remarkable climbing species of Dicentra, possessing a more restrained habit to only 3m tall in cultivation for us and of a similar stature when we encountered it in the wild in a Northern Indian mountain forest. With its own distinct bronzy tinted foliage born on bright reddish tendrilled stems, bearing generous clusters of orange-suffused yellow locket-flowers produced through the summer into autumn, followed by decorative inflated reddish beaked seed pods.

Dicentra (Papaveraceae) GWJ9376

lichiangensis see ventii

We encountered this remarkable climbing species in the mountain forests of the Singalila Ridge Northern India. Where it grew to only 3m tall, with its own distinctly bronzy tinted foliage born on bright reddish tendrilled stems. Bearing generous clusters of orange-suffused yellow locket-flowers produced through the summer into autumn, followed by distinct decorative inflated reddish beaked seed pods. Easily grown in well drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. Syn. Dactylicapnos

Dicentra (Papaveraceae)

macrantha

A remarkable plant, for the way it re-emerges in spring, thrusting through the ground to a height of 1m, in a week. Holding its stately foliage like fans, flowers large mid yellow. For a cool protected site in a leafy soil. A recent name change to a tongue twisting Ichthyoselmis

Dicentra (Papaveraceae)

macrocapnos

One of the best introductions of recent times from Nepal. A completely herbaceous climber, making annual growth of 7-10m, in a site sheltered from strong winds and late spring frosts. Flowers bright yellow June-Dec. Syn. Dactylicapnos

Dicentra (Papaveraceae) GWJ9438

scandens

A remarkably common plant in the area where we made this seed collection in Lava a remote protected area in Northern India at 2150m. Where it formed an herbaceous climber, making annual growth of 3-4m over small trees and shrubs. Bearing yellow locket-flowers June-July, followed by distinct inflated bullet-shaped purple seed pods hanging like grapes. Easily grown in a site sheltered from strong winds, plant in shade growing into sun. Syn. Dactylicapnos

Dicentra (Papaveraceae)

scandens f. thalictrifolia

A most unusual form of this completely herbaceous climbing species, which thrusts forth 3-4m of annual growth in late March-April. With distinctly narrowly leafleted much divided leaves and axillary clusters of pale yellow locket-shaped flowers June-Aug, followed by large bunches of inflated seed pods hanging like grapes. Easily grown in a site sheltered from strong winds and late spring frosts with adequate drainage. Syn. Dactylicapnos

Dicentra (Papaveraceae) GWJ9376

ventii

We encountered this remarkable climbing species in the mountain forests of the Singalila Ridge Northern India. Where it grew to only 3m tall, with its own distinctly bronzy tinted foliage born on bright reddish tendrilled stems. Bearing generous clusters of orange-suffused yellow locket-flowers produced through the summer into autumn, followed by distinct decorative inflated reddish beaked seed pods. Easily grown in well drained fertile soil in sun or part shade. Syn. Dactylicapnos

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ11790

× Hydrangea ytiensis

See × Didrangea for more details. Originally thought to be Hydrangea lingii as described in the Flora of China, but after further investigation it has been recognised as a natural bi-generic hybrid

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8371

aff. hirsuta from Lao

One of the few collections we made near Nonghat in the north of Lao. A new species to cultivation closely related to Hydrangea forming a small shrub to 2m high, in the wild, slightly less in cultivation. With upright branches of narrow hairy leaves, thick textured and, semi-evergreen. Bearing August-frost, dense terminal branched clusters of fertile white petalled flowers, closely followed by violet-blue berries. Untried for hardiness keep out of cold winds, sun or shade. in a sheltered spot, or in a container

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ8207

aff. hirsuta from Vietnam

From one of our collection made in the far north of Vietnam, a new species to cultivation closely related to Hydrangea forming a small shrub to 2m high, in the wild, slightly less in cultivation. With upright branches of narrow hairy leaves, thick textured and, semi-evergreen. Bearing August-frost, dense terminal branched clusters of fertile white petalled flowers, closely followed by violet-blue berries. Untried for hardiness keep out of cold winds, sun or shade. in a sheltered spot, or in a container.

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ7177

aff. versicolor

From one of our collection made in the far north of Thailand on the slopes of Doi Phohom-Pok on the border with Burma in the winter of 1999. An evergreen species closely related to Hydrangea forming a small shrub to 2m high, in the wild, less in cultivation. With upright branches of narrow broadly elliptic thick textured leaves, bearing August-frost, dense terminal panicles of pale blue flowers with recurved petals, closely followed by bright-blue berries. Untried for hardiness keep out of cold winds, best grown in sun or light shade in a sheltered spot, or in a container.

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ6565

aff. versicolor

New species to cultivation from our collection in the far north of Thailand. Shrub to 2m, closely related to Hydrangea. The leaves are thick textured, semi-evergreen for a sheltered spot. Flowering Aug-frost, with dense terminal branched clusters of blue flowers. Out of cold wind, sun or shade.

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ6605

aff. versicolor

New species to cultivation from our collection made on Doi Phahompok the second highest mountain of Thailand. Shrub to 2m, closely related to Hydrangea. The leaves are thick textured, semi-evergreen for a sheltered spot. Flowering Aug-frost, with dense terminal branched clusters of blue flowers. Out of cold wind, sun or shade.

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ2367

cynea

A Himalayan shrub to 3m tall, but more like half that in British gardens. Closely related to and resembling Hydrangea (recently discovered that they hybridise with Hydrangea). With leaves which are semi-evergreen, persisting in sheltered areas. Flowering August to frost, even through a mild winter, with dense terminal branched cymes of pale blue to pink all fertile flowers (depending on pH), followed by blue to purple fleshy fruit. Originating from one of our seed collections gathered at 2,500m from the small forested area of Lava West Bengal northern India during our expedition there in 1994. Shelter out of cold winds, sun or part shade. Syn. D. febrifuga (was assumed to be the Himalayan species).

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) HWJK2430

cynea

Originating from one of our seed collections gathered at 1,250m from the Mewa Kola north-eastern Nepal, on our decent from Topke Khola in the autumn of 2002. A Himalayan shrub to 3m tall, but more like half that in British gardens. Closely related to and resembling Hydrangea (recently discovered that they hybridise with Hydrangea). With leaves which are semi-evergreen, persisting in sheltered areas. Flowering August to frost, even through a mild winter, with dense terminal branched cymes of pale blue to pink all fertile flowers (depending on pH), followed by blue to purple fleshy fruit. Shelter out of cold winds, sun or part shade. Syn. D. febrifuga (was assumed to be the Himalayan species).

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ9753

febrifuga

A very ornate species with strongly upright dark-blue stems bearing large very broadly elliptic serrulate leaves, hirsute on the veins below. With very large terminal panicles 30-40 cm long of pale blue flowers with recurved petals (late summer), which had been succeeded by large navy-blue fleshy fruit. Forming a substantial plant in the forest of Dalat, a mountain station in Vietnam where we collected the blue fruit in the autumn of 2003. Untried for hardiness keep out of cold winds, best grown in sun to part shade in a sheltered spot, or in a container. Syn. D. aff. yunnanensis.

Dichroa (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ9734

febrifuga

Forming a substantial plant in the mountain forest of Dalat where we collected the blue fruit of this very ornate species in Vietnam. With strongly upright dark-blue stems bearing large very broadly elliptic serrulate leaves, hirsute on the veins below. With large terminal panicles of pale blue flowers with recurved petals (late summer), many of which had been succeeded by large navy-blue fleshy fruit. Untried for hardiness keep out of cold winds, best grown in sun to part shade in a sheltered spot, or in a container. Syn. D. aff. yunnanensis

Didrangea (× ) (Hydrangeaceae) BSWJ11790

ytiensis

Originally thought to be a Hydrangea species as described in the Flora of China, but after further investigation it has been recognised as a natural bi-generic hybrid. Forming a shrubs to only 1.5m tall where I found this unusual species in the wild in cleared forest where animals grazed, close to the border with China in northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2006. Immediately recognisable as different on account of the glossy elliptic leaves that were purple on both sides in the sun, a trait it has yet to perform in our garden, probably due to the lack of sun. In our garden the broad terminal cymes of all fertile blue to purple flowers are born all summer into autumn. Best grown in a drained fertile soil with some moisture retention in sun or light shade out of freezing winds.

Dioscorea (Dioscoreaceae)

quinqueloba

A protected plant, one of the so-called hardy yams. Growing from a long lived, and in time large tuber. Deciduous, perennial with annual climbing stems bearing deeply lobed ornamental leaves and green/yellow flowers in summer. Height 2m. Sun or shade and well drained soil.

Diospyros (Caprifoliaceae) FMWJ13164

species from Vietnam

This species was initially considered to be D. lotus, but I am reconsidering that identification, hence it will take a bit more time for me to work it out. The foliage is softly pubescent while the fruits were small with a large calyx. From a seed collection I gathered from a remote valley deep in the Hoang Lien Mountains in northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2011. From a small tree growing on the riverbank, where some of our crew had been scoffing the fruit for their breakfast. Best grown in a warm situation sheltered from freezing winds in a reasonably drained soil with some moisture retention.

Diphylleia (Berberidaceae)

cymosa

A N. American bulbous rooted perennial. Grown primarily for its twin leaves, which can attain 60cm across, bearing a rounded head of white flowers, which mature to indigo blue berries. For a woodsy soil in full to part shade.

Diphylleia (Berberidaceae)

grayi

A tuberous rooted perennial originating from the cold high mountain forests of northern Honshu and Hokkaido, Japan. Grown primarily for its butterfly-like twin leaves, that can attain 60cm across and are softly pubescent below. Which are borne on a 30-60cm tall stocky stem, bearing a cyme of up to 10 white flowers in late spring, which mature to blue-bloomy berries by mid-late summer. Bearing the vernacular name of 'skeleton flower' as the flowers are transparent when wet. Best grown a woodsy humus rich to moist soil in full-part shade.

Diphylleia (Berberidaceae)

sinensis

From damp areas of W. China a bulbous rooted perennial. Grown primarily for its twin leaves, on stems to 1m, which can attain 60cm across, bearing a rounded head of white flowers, which mature to indigo blue berries. For a woodsy soil in full to part shade.

Diplopanax (Cornaceae) BSWJ11803

stachyanthus

A relic plant from before the Ice Age. From one of our seed collections gathered from the forest around Fansipan, the highest mountain in northern Vietnam, where cold snaps and snow are common in the winter. Forming a large tree in the ancient forest where this walnut-like seed was collected, much smaller in regenerating areas, typically 7-8m with large leathery oblong leaves on red petioles. Bearing their fuzzy 5-petalled flowers on many branched terminal panicles 30cm long soon followed by large oblong seed encased in a green husk to 5.5cm long with u shaped kernels. Best grown in a sheltered warm situation with possibly some protection from frosts. Previously identified as Elaeocarpus.

Dipsacus (Dipsacaceae) HWJ695

japonicus

A perennial from the Sapa area of N. Vietnam, comprising of a basal rosette of hairy lobed leaves out of which emerges vertical stems bearing numerous heads of cream-coloured flowers. Height 1.2m, for a sunny well drained soil. Possibly a Cephalaria sp., a genera not in the Vietnamese Flora.

Disepalum (Annonaceae) FMWJ13375

petelotii

An evergreen shrub to small tree in the wild, collected from Y Ty on the north Vietnamese border with southern China, 4 m tall where we found this collection. With dark grey branches, slightly hairy when young. Clothed in narrowly elliptic, oblong-lanceolate, leaves 12.5 × 2.5 cm, leathery dark shiny green and glabrous, base acutely angled to the short petioles, apex acuminate sometimes with long acumen. Inflorescences terminal or sometimes opposite a leaf, single-flowered, the flowers 3 cm across. Petals greenish to yellow with a purple base, followed by up to 20 ellipsoid to cylindric-ellipsoid dark purple fruit in an orbicular cluster on long peduncles. Flowering from March to November in the wild.

Disepalum (Annonaceae) BSWJ11690

petelotii

An evergreen shrub to small tree in the wild, only 2 m tall where we found this collection. With dark grey branches, slightly hairy when young. Clothed in narrowly elliptic, oblong-lanceolate, leaves 12.5 × 2.5 cm, leathery dark shiny green and glabrous, base acutely angled to the short petioles, apex acuminate sometimes with long acumen. Inflorescences terminal or sometimes opposite a leaf, single-flowered, the flowers 3 cm across. Petals greenish to yellow with a purple base, followed by up to 20 ellipsoid to cylindric-ellipsoid dark purple fruit in an orbicular cluster on long peduncles. Flowering from March to November in the wild. Collected from Y Ty on the north Vietnamese border with southern China.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae) BSWJ229

arisanensis

A new species to cultivation found by ourselves in the high mountain forests of the Central Mountains in Taiwan in 1992. Similar in appearance to a Solomon’s seal, but distinctly evergreen with arching stems to approximately 40cm. With rounded to elongated thick textured alternate leaves which bear pendant scented white flowers sometimes heavily blotched dark purple in June. Followed by plump pale purple berries which persist until the following spring. Easily grown in a moisture retentive humus rich soil that is drained, in full-part shade.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae) BSWJ1864

arisanensis

A new species to cultivation originaly found by ourselves in the high mountain forests of the Central Mountains in Taiwan in 1992, this collection representing our 1993 gathering. Similar in appearance to a Solomon’s seal, but distinctly evergreen with arching stems to approximately 40cm. With rounded to elongated thick textured alternate leaves which bear pendant scented white flowers sometimes heavily blotched dark purple in June. Followed by plump pale purple berries which persist until the following spring. Easily grown in a moisture retentive humus rich soil that is drained, in full-part shade.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae)

aspersa

Evergreen rhizomatous perennial, closely related to Polygonatum. With erect darkly mottled stems holding the arching alternate broad leaves to 60 cm. Producing its scented white, purple-yellow inside, axillary flowers in June followed by purplish fruit. Plant in leafy moist but well drained shade.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae)

aspersa tall form

Evergreen rhizomatous perennial, closely related to Polygonatum. With erect darkly mottled stems to 80 cm tall, bearing the arching alternate broad leathery leaves. Producing its scented white, purple-yellow inside, axillary flowers in June followed by purplish fruit. Plant in leafy moist but well drained shade.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae) FMWJ13457

bodinieri

One of our collections of this new species to cultivation gathered with Aaron Floden and Tom Mitchell from our 5-Fingers trek in the Hoang Lien mountains of northern Vietnam in 2011. Although I had collected it in a different are of the same mountain range in 2007. Obviously a close relative to D. fusco-picta as it shares the distinct feature of moniliform rhizomes (like a string of beads). Another shared feature are the larger flowers, which like all species are held in the leaf axils. However the foliage is distinct in quantity of narrowly ovate evergreen leaves, with usually pronounced undulation to the rim. A slow growing species for us which can eventually attain a height of 80cm. Easily grown in a moisture retentive drained soil in full to light shade.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae) KWJ12277

bodinieri

A new species to cultivation originally found by ourselves in the Hoang Lien high mountains of northern Vietnam in the autumn of 2007. Obviously a close relative to D. fusco-picta as it shares the distinct feature of moniliform rhizomes (like a string of beads). Another shared feature are the larger flowers, which like all species are held in the leaf axils. However the foliage is distinct in quantity of narrowly ovate evergreen leaves, with usually pronounced undulation to the rim. A slow growing species for us which can eventually attain a height of 80cm. Easily grown in a moisture retentive drained soil in full to light shade.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae)

fuscopicta

From a distinctly knobbly slender rhizome (moniliform) simulating a string of beads. An evergreen perennial species endemic to China, closely related to and similar in appearance to Polygonatum. With arching stems of alternate glossy dark green leaves to 50 cm tall. Bearing few axially white purple tinged flowers 2.2cm April-May, followed by persistent purplish fruit. Plant in leafy moist but well drained shade.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae) BSWJ3891

luzoniense

A new species to cultivation found by ourselves in the high mountains of Northern Luzon, Philippines.(Recorded as D. fusco-picta, which has a moniliform rhizome) Perennial with a narrow cylindrical rhizome, attaining 40cm in a moist humus rich soil in full-part shade. The rounded glossy leaves are alternate and evergreen on strongly arching stems similar in habit to Polygonatum, with axillary white flowers in spring followed by persistent purple berries.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae)

pernyi

A robust evergreen rhizomatous perennial, closely related to Polygonatum, relishing a leafy moist but well drained soil. Arching stems of alternating rounded leaves attain 40cm, while producing its citrus scented white flared flowers in June. Plant in full to part shade.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae) BSWJ3388

taiwanensis

A new species to cultivation found by ourselves in the high mountains of Taiwan similar in habit to Polygonatum. Which can attain 40cm in a moist humus rich soil in full-part shade. The rounded leaves are alternate and evergreen, white pendent flowers purple-yellow inside, appear in June, followed by purple berries.

Disporopsis (Convallariaceae)

undulata

Evergreen perennial closely related to Polygonatum, emerging from slightly swollen rhizomes. With short erect mottled stems to 20 cm tall, bearing the arching alternate undulating leaves. Producing its scented creamy axillary flowers, which are purple and yellow inside, from May-June followed by purplish fruit. Easily grown in a leafy moist but well drained soil in shade.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) DJHC765

bodinieri

Tuberous rooted semi-evergreen woodland perennial, from a rather thick creeping rhizome, producing robust upright many branched stems 50-100cm tall. Bearing elliptic to ovate-lanceolate parchment textured leaves to 15cm long, still emerging as the stems extend. With terminal umbels of creamy white funnel-shaped flowers squeezing their way out of the still unfurling foliage May-June, followed by rounded blue-black berries August-on. Easily grown in a relatively warm shaded site in a leafy drained soil. One of Dan Hinkley's collections from China.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ9715

cantoniense

A species bearing narrowly ovate leaves and terminal pinkish flowers flared at the mouth resulting in blue-black berries. Our collection from the hills surrounding Dalat a Vietnamese hill-station with views of the border with Cambodia. Where this tuberous rooted perennial with short running rhizomes and branching stems 50-100cm grew in colonies on the highest hills mixed with small shrubs and long grasses.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

cantoniense

From a wide-spread distribution, a tuberous rooted perennial with short running rhizomes forming branching bamboo-like stems 50-100cm. Leaves narrowly ovate with terminal white or red flowers, berries blue-black.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) RWJ10103

cantoniense v. kawakamii

From one of our collections made with Dick Hayward in 2003 gathered from the Heping Logging Trail close to the East Coast of Taiwan. Where it was locally plentiful growing in dense shade on the forest edge, forming plants with a thicket of flexuous green stems to 1m tall. A tuberous rooted perennial with short running rhizomes, with branching stems 50-100cm. Leaves narrowly ovate with terminal white sometimes red tinted flowers, followed by blue-black orbicular berries. Best grown is a sheltered site in a moisture retentive but freely draining soil in light shade, protecting the rhizome from frost with a mulch.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ11291

cantoniense v. multiflorum

From one of our seed collections gathered from the Cameron Highlands on the Malay Peninsular in the winter of 2005. An evergreen woodland perennial, from a thick creeping rhizome, producing robust upright stems 1-2m tall branched in the upper portion. Bearing elliptic-orbicular abruptly tipped thick-textured dark green leaves to15cm long, still emerging as the stems extend. With terminal and few axillary umbels of creamy white narrowly funnel-shaped flowers May-June, followed by globose blue-black berries on distinctly long stalks (5cm) August-on. Best grown in a warm shaded site in a leafy drained soil, protecting the roots from frost.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ2358

cantoniense v. sikkimense

From one of our collections made from the forest of a small area of West Bengal northern India that we visited in 1994. A variety of this species that differs so much that it is difficult to equate it to the species. A woodland perennial, from a relatively thick creeping rhizome, producing slender upright branching stems 80-90cm tall. Bearing ovate pale green distinctly veined leaves to 7.5cm long, still emerging as the stems extend. With terminal sessile umbels of distinctly large greenish-white broadly funnel-shaped flowers on long bristly stalks May-June, followed by globose blue-black berries August-on. Easily grown in a shaded site in a leafy drained soil, protecting the roots severe from frost.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ2337

cantoniense v. sikkimense

A variety of this species that differs so much that it is difficult to equate it to the species. A woodland perennial, from a relatively thick creeping rhizome, producing slender upright branching stems 80-90cm tall. Bearing ovate pale green distinctly veined leaves to 7.5cm long, still emerging as the stems extend. With terminal sessile umbels of distinctly large greenish-white broadly funnel-shaped flowers on long bristly stalks May-June, followed by globose blue-black berries August-on. From one of our collections made from the forest of a small area of West Bengal northern India that we visited in 1994. Easily grown in a shaded site in a leafy drained soil, protecting the roots from severe frost.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) WWJ11958

cantoniense v. y-tiense

From a seed collection gathered from close to the small village of Y Ty from a mountain pass on the border between northern Vietnam and China with Peter Wharton in 2007. With blue-black orbicular fruit collected from a semi-evergreen clump forming species with bamboo-like stems and foliage to 1m tall, growing with black cardamom. Bearing clusters of long campanulate dark reddish flowers on the ends of short branches in summer. A distinct variety on account of the length of flowers to 4cm with oblanceolate tepals that are around 4 mm wide with acuminate apex. Best grown in a sheltered position in part shade in a moisture retentive drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) HWJ1045

cantoniense v. y-tiense

A seed collection from a memorable day on my explorative visit to a mountain pass close to a small village of Y Ty, on the border between northern Vietnam and China. The blue-black fruit containing the seed was collected from a semi-evergreen clump forming species to 1.5m tall, growing in scrub and grasses. With bamboo-like stems and foliage, bearing clusters of long campanulate dark reddish flowers on the ends of short branches. A distinct variety on account of the length of flowers to 4cm with oblanceolate tepals that are around 4 mm wide with acuminate apex. Best grown in a sheltered position in part shade in a moisture retentive drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ872

flavens

30-60cm rarely branched strong upright stems, bearing April-May, clusters of long pendent yellow flowers, followed by blue-black ovoid berries. Collected by us in Ch'õllip'o S. Korea. Best in well drained leafy soil, in shade.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

hookeri = see Prosartes

Tuberous rooted perennial, forming clumps from underground creeping rhizomes. Of strongly branched stems 30-60cm, with ovate-orbicular leaves, bearing white flared flowers March-May, followed by large orange berries. For full-part shade in humus rich, moist soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

hookeri v. oreganum = see Prosartes

A small delicate-looking tuberous rooted perennial from the mountains of The Pacific Coast area of North America. Forming small clumps from underground shortly creeping rhizomes. With strongly branched stems 30-60cm tall, bearing acuminate leaves and white flowers with protruding stamens from March-May, followed by conspicuous yellow-orange berries. Easily grown in full-part shade in humus rich, moisture retentive drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

lanuginosum = see Prosartes

Another desirable perennial species, from Eastern North American woodlands, forming neat clumps from underground shortly creeping rhizomes. Producing lax branched stems 45-80cm long, bearing numerous alternate ovate leaves and green spidery flared flowers at the tips of the branches, May-June, soon followed by very conspicuous orange-red plump berries. Easily grown in full-part shade in a humus rich fertile soil with good drainage.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ9484

leschenaultianum

A distinct perennial species isolated from others by its location in the mountainous areas of the south-western Indian subcontinent. Forming rigidly upright purplish branched stems 25-90 cm tall, with ovate to rounded dark green foliage and terminal 2-5 flowered inflorescences of funnel-shaped clear white scented flowers from early summer and sporadically through into winter. Which are also distinct in the resulting dark blue globose fruit. Easily grown in a warm partly shaded spot with adequate drainage to the humusy soil. Our collection from Sri Lanka.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ10160

leschenaultianum

A distinct perennial species isolated from others by its location in the mountainous areas of the south-western Indian subcontinent. Forming rigidly upright purplish branched stems 25-90 cm tall, with ovate to rounded dark green foliage and terminal 2-5 flowered inflorescences of funnel-shaped clear white scented flowers. Which are also distinct in the resulting dark blue globose fruit. Easily grown in a warm partly shaded spot with adequate drainage to the humusy soil. Our collection from Sri Lanka.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ9530

leschenaultianum

A distinct perennial species isolated from others by its location in the mountainous areas of the south-western Indian subcontinent. Forming rigidly upright purplish branched stems 25-90 cm tall, with ovate to rounded dark green foliage and terminal 2-5 flowered inflorescences of funnel-shaped clear white scented flowers. Which are also distinct in the resulting dark blue globose fruit. Easily grown in a warm partly shaded spot with adequate drainage to the humusy soil. From one of our collection gathered from the Nilgiri Hills of Southern India.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

leucanthum

Tuberous rooted perennial with slender running rhizomes, with branched stems 30-50cm tall. Leaves oblong-elliptic somewhat variable in shape, bearing terminal clusters of white flared pendant flowers in spring, followed by blue-black berries. Easily grown in a humus rich soil in full to light shade.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BWJ8128

longistylum

A rhizomatous woodland perennial species with thick creeping stolons, forming tall many branched stem to 1.5m tall. Bearing lanceolate to elliptic semi-evergreen leaves to 15cm long with long acuminate tips and terminal umbellate inflorescences of creamy white funnel-shaped flowers squeezing their way out of the still unfurling foliage May-June, followed by rounded blue-black berries August-on. Easily grown in a relatively warm partly shaded site in a leafy drained soil. From one of my collections gathered in Sichuan China in 2000.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) L1564

longistylum

One of Roy Lancaster's collections from Sichuan China, given to us by the celebrated nurserywoman Elisabeth Strangman some years ago. It has taken a pride of place in our walled garden for most of that time, drawing much comment and admiration. A rhizomatous species without creeping stolons, with tall branched stem to 1.8m. Bearing lanceolate to elliptic leaves to 6cm long with long acuminate tips and terminal umbellate inflorescences of pale greenish yellow flowers the stamens and style distinctly exserted. Easily grown in a warm partly shaded spot with adequate drainage to the humusy soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ2859

longistylum

A Chinese species that has taken a pride of place in our walled garden for many years, drawing much comment and admiration. A rhizomatous species without creeping stolons, with tall branched stem to 1.8m. Bearing lanceolate to elliptic leaves to 6cm long with long acuminate tips and terminal umbellate inflorescences of pale greenish yellow flowers the stamens and style distinctly exserted. Easily grown in a warm partly shaded spot with adequate drainage to the humusy soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

lutescens

Rare perennial with slender, creeping underground rhizomes. Branching stems 10-60cm high, bare elliptic leaves terminating in 1-3 greenish-yellow flowers April-June. For full-part shade in humus rich, well drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

maculatum = see Prosartes

One of the best and desirable perennial species originating from Eastern North American woodlands, forming tight clumps from thick underground rhizomes. Producing upright slender few branched stems 45-80cm tall. Bearing few alternate ovate-elongated leaves and large white spidery flared flowers finely speckled purple, at the tips of the branches, May-June, soon followed by orange-red plump berries. Easily grown in full-part shade in a humus rich fertile soil with good drainage.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

megalanthum

Very rare in cultivation and one of the most desired species by gardeners. From a short rhizome smooth branched stems rise to 30cm, while the 3cm long white campanulate flowers unfold April-June, extending to 60cm tall in fruit, which is blue-black. For full-part shade in humus rich, well drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ359

nantauense

One of our collection from the Alishan area of central Taiwan gathered on our first trip there in 1992. Suckering perennial arising from running rhizomes soon forming small colonies with upright green stems to 50cm tall, with few branches in the upper parts bearing ovate to ovate-lanceolate thin textured leaves prominently impressed 3 veined above. With 2-5 terminal creamy-white heavily violet-red spotted at the mouth funnel-shaped strongly scented flowers borne spring into summer, followed by black berries. Easily grown in a leafy moisture retentive soil with good drainage in either full or light shade.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ6812

nantauense

Suckering perennial arising from running rhizomes soon forming small colonies with upright green stems to 50cm tall, with few branches in the upper parts bearing ovate to ovate-lanceolate thin textured leaves prominently impressed 3 veined above. With 2-5 terminal creamy-white heavily scented and violet-red spotted at the mouth funnel-shaped flowers borne spring into summer, followed by black berries. Our collection from the cold and wet area of Taipingshan in northern Taiwan gathered in 1999. Easily grown in a leafy moisture retentive soil with good drainage in either full or light shade.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

sessile

Bulbous perennial, forming colonies from underground creeping rhizomes. Stems 30-60cm, with narrow leaves and bearing pendant tubular white flowers April-May. For full-part shade in humus rich, well drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ2824

sessile

From one of our first collections made in Japan in 1995 from the hydrangea covered hills of Chiba. A vigorous tuberous-rooted perennial forming colonies from underground creeping slender rhizomes with branching stems 30-60cm tall, bearing narrowly ovate leaves and pendant tubular white flowers April-May. Easily grown in part-full shade in a well drained fertile soil with some moisture retention.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

sessile 'Aureovariegatum'

A recent introduction from Japan of this popular perennial, forming colonies from underground creeping rhizomes. Stems 30-60cm, leaves brightly creamy-yellow striped, bearing some variegated flowers April-May. For full-part shade in humus rich, well drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

sessile 'Variegatum'

A popular bulbous perennial, forming colonies from underground creeping rhizomes. Stems 30-60cm, leaves brightly white striped, bearing white or variegated flowers April-May. For full-part shade in humus rich, well drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

sessile 'Variegatum' clone 2

A popular tuberous rooted perennial, which varies in its variegated foliage from the normal clone seen in British cultivation that forms colonies from underground creeping rhizomes. With upright stems 30-60cm long, carrying creamy white striped variegated leaves as well as white or variegated flowers April-May. Easily grown in full-part shade in a humus rich, drained soil. A clone from cultivation in Japan.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ4316

sessile f. macrophyllum

A robust form of this species which is normally only found in cold areas of Japan, as is so often the case with our other collections from the remote Korean island of Ullüngdõ. Arising from a brittle running white slender underground rhizome with emerging upright green stems branching in the upper areas. Bearing oblong-elliptic leaves to 16×9.5cm and terminal inflorescences of up to 4 nodding tubular-campanulate white green-tinged flowers to 4cm long April- June. Esily grown in a moist humus rich soil with adequate drainage, in light to full shade.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ713

smilacinum

Small perennial with slender, creeping underground rhizomes, making large colonies in time. Branching stems 8-35cm high, bare elliptic leaves terminating in 1-4 greenish-white flowers April-May. For full-part shade in humus rich, well drained soil. Our collection from S. Korea.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

smilacinum

Of wide spread distribution in the wild a perennial with slender, creeping underground rhizomes, making large colonies in time. Branching stems 8-35cm high, bare elliptic leaves terminating in 1-4 greenish-white flowers April-May. For full-part shade in humus rich, well drained soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ531

smilacinum from Korea

One of the very first species we collected from the remote island of T'aehüksandõ South Korea in 1993, when we were marooned there with Dan Hinkley on his first collecting trip. A small species which we collected the seed of from a small perennial with slender, creeping underground rhizomes, capable of forming large colonies in time. With short branching stems 8-35cm tall, carrying small elliptic leaves terminating in 1-4 greenish-white widely flared flowers April-May. Easily grown in full-part shade in a humus rich, well drained fertile soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

smilacinum pink

A new and rare form of this species that we obtained from a Japanese nursery. Looking in all ways to be the same as the standard form of this perennial with slender, creeping underground rhizomes, forming sizeable clumps in time. Branching stems 8-35cm high, carry elliptic leaves terminating in 1-4 pale pink flowers April-May in this form.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

smithii = see Prosartes

Bulbous perennial, forming clumps from underground creeping rhizomes. Stems 30-60cm, bearing tubular creamy-white flowers March-May, followed by large orange berries. For full-part shade in humus rich, moist soil.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ1513

taiwanense

Tuberous rooted perennial with short running thick rhizomes, with branched stems 50-100cm, green tinged red. Leaves narrow with terminal creamy-yellow flowers red on the interior and tips, followed by blue-black berries. Our own introduction from the forests of Taiwan.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ7068

taiwanense

Closely related to D. cantoniense, which is similar in emerging from a short thick running rhizome, with branched stems 50-120cm tall, with 4-6 branches bearing oblong-lanceolate leaves to 12cm long. In this species the nodes and leaf bases are normally purple tinted, while the flowers are held terminally on the branches on short pedicels, the flowers being campanulate yellow to cream at the base merging to dark red at the tips and interior. From one of our collections gathered in Taroko, eastern Taiwan in the autumn of 1999 at 1700m, where it formed a sizeable colony. Best grown in a well drained fertile soil with some moisture retention, in sun to light shade, protect from severe frost.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) HWJ882

tonkinensis

From seed collected on Fansipan the highest mountain in northern Vietnam, gathered in 2003 with Dan Hinkley. A superlative rhizomatous woodland perennial species from a thick rootstock, that we have been anticipating the introduction for some years. Here we encountered the meter long arching stems clothed with broad almost rounded leaves impressed with parallel veining, bearing terminal clusters of bluish fruit, resulting from the showy red tipped white bell-shaped flowers. Maybe its the weight of this fruit that arches the tips of the stems all the way to the ground, where this species is unique in forming terminal plantlets.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ11766

tonkinensis

From a seed collection gathered from close to the small village of Y Ty from a mountain pass on the border between northern Vietnam and China in 2006. Where Sue and I found the meter long arching stems clothed with broad almost rounded leaves impressed with parallel veining, bearing a few large terminal bluish fruit, resulting from the showy red tipped white bell-shaped flowers. Maybe its the weight of this fruit that arches the tips of the stems all the way to the ground, where this species is unique in forming terminal plantlets. Best grown in a moisture retentive drained soil in shade.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ11814

tonkinensis

A superlative rhizomatous woodland perennial species from a thick rootstock, that we have been anticipating the introduction for some years. Since first encountering it in the high mountain forests of the area it is named for, Tonkin an area that straddles the border of Vietnam and China. Here we encounter the meter long arching stems clothed with broad almost rounded leaves impressed with parallel veining, bearing a few large terminal bluish fruit, resulting from the showy red tipped white bell-shaped flowers. Maybe its the weight of this fruit that arches the tips of the stems all the way to the ground, where this species is unique in forming terminal plantlets.

Disporum (Convallariaceae) BSWJ11672

tonkinensis

Since first encountering this superlative rhizomatous woodland perennial species in the high mountain forests of the area it is named for, Tonkin, an area that straddles the border of Vietnam and China. We have encounter the meter long arching stems clothed with broad almost rounded leaves impressed with parallel veining, bearing a few large terminal bluish fruit, resulting from the showy red tipped white bell-shaped flowers. Maybe its the weight of this fruit that arches the tips of the stems all the way to the ground, where this species is unique in forming terminal plantlets. Best grown in a moisture retentive drained soil in shade.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

trabeculatum

A persistent tufted evergreen perennial species emerging from a solid rhizome. With upright green stems 80-100cm tall with few branches in the upper parts, bearing ovate-lanceolate to elliptic leathery leaves to 5.5cm long still emerging as the stems extend. With terminal 2-5 flowered umbels of greenish-yellow funnel-shaped flowers squeezing their way out of the still unfurling foliage May-July, followed by globose blue-black berries. Best grown in a sheltered spot in part shade, or in a container, protecting from the coldest weather.

Disporum (Convallariaceae)

trabeculatum 'Nakafu'

A cultivar we purchased on one of our forays to some of the Japanese nurseries. Which has persistent evergreen foliage with us in sheltered conditions, displaying a distinct yellow variegation in the centre of the leaves on the new growth in spring which fades, re-establishing as it ages. Bearing pendant white flowers in 2-5 flowered umbels. Best grown in a very sheltered spot in part shade, or in a container, protecting from the coldest weather.